Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Leo Meyerovich
249 followers -
Scientist-for-hire
Scientist-for-hire

249 followers
About
Leo's posts

Post has attachment
Per request, slides from my research w/ Ari Rabkin on Empirical Analysis of Programming Language Adoption (OOPSLA best paper!) 

Post has attachment
Don't mind the parentheses -- a synthesis approach to regex and sed.

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
New post. (.. and I need to learn G+ permissions!)

Post has attachment

Most fun meeting in a long while: sketching out parallel algorithms & architecture for a component of the new Servo browser.

Did anything happen in 1983-1990 that would trigger 11 year olds to write their first program? Apple IIe and BASIC may have triggered it, but what killed it? For the decades before and after, the average age was 2-3 years older! #socioplt

Google spreadsheets/forms only recorded half my survey data. Do not recommend :(

Post has attachment
We finally released our visualizations about quantifying programming language beliefs! Play with our visualizations, spread the word, help science by taking the  survey, and tell more friends :)

Post has shared content
Speaking for myself, and not my employer.


As someone sitting on a trove of really amazing (but not openly sharable) data, I'm torn on this. On one hand I don't have a problem with the scientific community refusing to publish papers where the data isn't open. That's the academic community's prerogative, but I believe it does so at its own peril: Not allowing companies to publish analyses based on proprietary data means that the community can't benefit, even if the raw data isn't available. On the other hand publishing in a peer-reviewed, scientific venue is not the be-all-end-all. There are lots of ways to "publish" your work these days, and getting into a journal like Science or Nature is not that important for companies.

What bothers me more is the attitude that "it's not fair for Google, Microsoft, and Amazon to have such great data." Sorry, bub, you're in the wrong line of work if you think that academics are ever going to get as many resources as a big company.
Wait while more posts are being loaded