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Bryce Etheridge
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Noblesse oblige
Noblesse oblige

308 followers
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While I absolutely hate to say this, politically Trumps boisterous support of Israel and moving the US embassy to Jerusalem is... brillant. This seems like it's not that big of a deal at the moment, but I feel that it will ultimately end up being a significant blow to the Democratic party.

Here's the thing. Jewish Americans vote overwhelmingly for Democrats, but there are two facts that make this a shaky alliance. First is that Israel's own conservative factions kinda shockingly resemble Trumpkins: Populist, Nationalist, Xenophobic, Religious. In a sense they 'get' each other because while they represent different countries, they are the same things for those countries.

The second important info is that the Liberal Zeitgeist has been trending sympathetic for the Palestinians for the last decade. The basis of this being recognition that Israel does a lot wrong without ever owning up to its bad actions. This leads to chafing against what liberal americans see as immoral bullying actions by a powerful Israel against a weak Palestine. This does not necessarily mean liberals are trending against Israel's existence, but with polarization as bad as it is, that's how many Israeli will see it as on the internet any criticism of Israel is an attack on its existence.

So what are the effects going to be in US politics? At least some of the American Jewish population are going to switch their allegiance to the GOP, weakening one of the Democratic Party's most loyal demographics and a significant group in its donor base. Donations are survivable for the Dems, but weakening the coalition will be a blow.

Will the bringing in a Jews go so far as to save the GOP from the problems it has with the shifting sands of US demographics? I won't say no. I honestly believe that a pretty damn significant percentage of especially older Jewish Americans could value heritage above prior party allegiance. With ~7.3 million Jews in the USA, dropping from the 80% current democratic support to 70% would basically be a 1Million vote electoral swing. That plus while I just said that the money is a lesser problem for Dems, donation changes can add up.

What can the Democratic Party do? Nothing. Just as the post-election misguided calls of 'Back to the center Democrats!' were resoundly rejected by by the new, young, liberal democrats. A call of 'go support these honestly kinda fashy conservatives in Israel while ignoring moral concerns and for pure political gains' is going to go down about as well as you'd expect.
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I've seen a lot of otherwise progressive people eat the 'BLM is violent' or 'BLM and Antifa are morally equivalent' lines. But it's propaganda. Very successful propaganda.

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"The white supremacists, neo-Nazis and alt-right members hit people with sticks, threw rocks, threw bricks, sprayed clergy members with pepper spray in the face."

Every member of BLM who was there that day says they responded with nonviolence. "We came to march," Straughn says. "Some people assume Black Lives Matter is a violent organization, and we didn't want to give that impression. We came unarmed. We came with nothing but peace in our hearts and aggressive words for the Nazis. We knew that if we tried to engage them violently, we would be crucified by the media."

If BLM being described as nonviolent sounds strange to you, then you're probably watching too much Fox News. The movement has been wildly misunderstood partly because of how it's caricatured and demonized by right-wing media...
...
"Black Lives Matter is not a racist group; anyone can join. It's a movement to expand civil rights for the oppressed in this society. It's a peaceful protest against oppression. There's simply no equivalence between Black Lives Matter and a hate group. It's truly offensive to equate them."
/Quote

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/toure-inside-black-lives-matter-w513190
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I just learned that they're making an 'Altered Carbon' movie...

NONONONONONONONONO

https://www.engadget.com/2017/12/04/netflix-altered-carbon-trailer-blade-runner/

I've read the book, fundamentally it was a far-future noir detective story, and it was ok. But look, if they stick to the book then this going to be one of the most violent and disturbing movies ever made. It's Neuromancer if they lay off the grit but up the general malaise and violence. Sin City without the veneer of artistry. It is NOT Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

I literally used this book as an example in a post about how sci-fi authors can suddenly and without warning detour their books plot to 'this will traumatize you' territory for a chapter or two, for no good goddamn reason.

Can the horror be written around? Sure. Of Course. But why bother adopting the book in the first place if you're going to alter it that much. You want a beloved dystopian sci-fi novel that would adopt well? Snowcrash

You want to make a dark, heady, make-you-think movie that will win you awards like Blade Runner? The Diamond Age

You want to traumatize some fucking adults while dicking around with sci-fi concepts? Altered Carbon
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TL;DR economic systems and circumstance have driven the millennial conception of self in a very rational way. What appears to the olds to be narcissism by marketing and commoditizing oneself is actually a sensical way of interacting with a world that is already commoditizing your existence. Reacting to an "If you are not paying for it, you are the product" world with "well if that's the case, then I should market myself to get the most out of it."

Quote:
A young college graduate, having faithfully followed the American path of hard work and achievement, might now find herself in a position akin to a homeowner with negative equity: in possession of an asset that is worth much less than what she owes. In these conditions, the concept of self-interest starts to splinter. For young people, I suspect, the idea of specialness looks like a reward but mostly functions as punishment, bestowing on us the idea that there is no good way of existing other than constantly generating returns.
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Someone gets it.

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“The newfound popularity of socialism among millennials is an alarming trend,” Sasse writes in “The Vanishing American Adult.” He provides a syllabus that he hopes will steer people away from such thinking, and toward an intellectually mature adulthood, and he dutifully includes “The Communist Manifesto,” so that his hypothetical pupils can properly grasp how wrong it is. It seems more likely that a young person who opened “The Communist Manifesto” tomorrow would underline the part about personal worth being reduced to exchange value and go off to join the Democratic Socialists of America
/Quote

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/12/04/where-millennials-come-from
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Roy Moore...

I think that Moore will not drop out, and the GOP will not do a write-in.

Moore/Jones under that circumstance is probably a toss up. I would not give it any better than 55/45 Jones. Though how much polls underestimated Northam in the Virginia Governors race is something to keep in mind (weighted by how little polling most gubernatorial races are going to receive)

If Moore wins, my next bet is that he is seated and no tricks will be used to remove him. Moore is a problem for McConnell, but he's still a red seat and they're not going to give that up lightly when they only have a 2 seat margin and rebellion in the ranks already.

(lightly... ya know, like sexually assaulting underage women. minor things. /s)
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Are we all really just going to gloss over that WikiLeaks was directly hacking websites?

And yes, 'guessing their password' over the internet is hacking that has put people in jail under the computer fraud and abuse act.
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beautiful. The answer is a lot more nuanced and analytical than the title leads on.

And I don't know if it happened. I'm not willing to say yes, I'm not willing to say no. But this article beautifully articulates why the Bill Clinton one was hard. In no small part because Broaddrick politically weaponized it and place herself firmly amongst a group of compulsive liars.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/13/opinion/juanita-broaddrick-bill-clinton.html
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