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Víktor Bautista i Roca
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Informàtic de formació, m'hi vaig dedicar durant gairebé 10 anys. Ara estic en una etapa més centrat en el món dels jocs
Informàtic de formació, m'hi vaig dedicar durant gairebé 10 anys. Ara estic en una etapa més centrat en el món dels jocs

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This Man Is About to Blow Up Mathematics

But that is exactly what Friedman has done. What’s more, he wants to bring back what he’s found, and break incompleteness out of its quarantine. For the past 50 years—more than 100,000 hours, he’s fond of saying—he has searched for a new theory, one that will introduce “natural” ways for incompleteness and large cardinals to become entangled in the everyday workings of finite mathematics.

Now, he believes he’s finally broken through.

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"Make America grope again."
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Kikou le coucou
de Víktor Bautista i Roca i Josep M. Allué

Uns catalans hem guanyat, per primer cop, un dels premis més prestigiosos del món del joc, l'As d'or - Jeu de l'année, en la categoria infantil, atorgat al teatre Debussy del palau de congressos de Canes dijous 23 de febrer.

Ha estat amb el joc Kikou le coucou, publicat per Haba.

Un joc que va trigar en trobar editor i que, un cop trobat, els va fer trencar el cap per a veure com produir-lo. Trobar el pes correcte dels ous, una llauna de mides adients, com pintar els bastonets... Tot un malson per a ells. Gràcies.

Per ara se n'han fet edicions en alemany (Zum Kuckuck), anglès (Go cuckoo), neerlandès (Kiki Koekoek) i francès (Kikou le coucou) i es distribueix a nivell mundial. I en un món en què no són estranyes les edicions de 2000 exemplars ja anem camí dels 20 000. A veure si aquest premi li dóna un bon impuls.

A l'estat espanyol se'n distribueix actualment l'edició alemanya, sota el nom El cuco kiko estrena nido. A veure si es decideixen a fer-ne una edició en català, que el món del joc és un dels àmbits on el català no té gaire presència. Per cert, el nom original del joc era en aquesta llengua, és clar: El niu del cucut.

El premi ens el van donar ahir al vespre (el 23F canviarà de significat, per a nosaltres) i avui ja ens ho comencem a creure.

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Alguns enllaços:

* http://unmondedejeux.blog.lemonde.fr/2017/02/23/unlock-recompense-par-las-dor-le-prix-du-jeu-de-societe-de-lannee/
* http://www.jugamostodos.org/index.php/noticias-en-el-mundo/noticias-94262/7130-as-d-or-2017
* http://www.festivaldesjeux-cannes.com/asdor/winners
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24/2/17
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As d'or - Jeu de l'année enfant
Kikou le coucou
Víktor Bautista i Roca & Josep M. Allué 
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Leonardo da Vinci no rep prou crèdit per haver-nos deixat les instruccions de com dibuixar àngels a la neu.
#DaVinci, master of snow angels all over! Via CAFE #VitruvianMan 
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Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters Burn Their Camp Ahead of Evacuation. For months, protesters have camped in the frigid North Dakota winter, opposing the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Recently, state officials ordered them to evacuate the campground, located on federal land, due to spring flooding. O'Shea Spencer, 20, stands in front of the remains of a hogan structure. Campers set structures on fire in preparation for the Army Corp's 2 pm deadline to leave the Oceti Sakowin protest camp on February 22, 2017 in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. (Stephen Yang / Getty) #dapl

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Something amazing: we have not only the first detection of Earth-sized planets outside our Solar System, but a detection of seven planets around a single star only 40 light-years away - right next door by astronomical standards. These planets orbit a dim dwarf star named Trappist-1 (after the telescope which discovered it, the Transiting Planets and Planetesimals Small Telescope in Chile), and by happy chance, are angled in a good way for us to study them. Even better, at least one of them is in the star's "Goldilocks Zone" - at the right sort of temperature to support things like liquid water and an atmosphere.

The paper itself won't be out until Wednesday, but you can get preliminary data about the system here: http://www.trappist.one/#system . (This includes coordinates, but you'll need a strong telescope to see it; this dim star in Aquarius has an apparent magnitude of 18.80, about as bright in the sky as the dwarf planet Eris)

The system is unusual in that three of the planets may support life: Trappist-1d, e, and f. Even more interestingly, the three are similar enough that someone from one planet could potentially survive on the others. All three have roughly terrestrial gravity -- maybe 0.7g's on d and e, and 0.6g's on f. They are of similar sizes, having surface areas 60, 80, and 110% of Earth's, respectively.

Trappist-1d is the most Earthlike: the average temperature is 288K (15C, 59F), the same as on Earth. If you looked up in the sky there with human eyes, you would see a salmon-colored star, about five and a half times the apparent diameter of our own Sun, but somewhat dimmer; at noon, it would be about 15% brighter than it is on Earth. Of course, eyes which evolved on Trappist-1d wouldn't be tuned to the yellow light of our own Sun; they would be much more likely to see light much further into the infrared and less into the blues, and the light would look a "neutral white" to local eyes, just like our own Sun does to us.

If anything has evolved to photosynthesize in the Trappist-1 system, its analogue of chlorophyll would be principally absorbing in the far infra-red, and the local plants would look dark and reddish to our eyes; the oranges and yellows that make up so much of our own vision would be as exotic to Trappists as the ultraviolet which bees see is to us.

But daily life there would be somewhat more different, because in such tight orbits (close in around a small star, with a "year" of four days on Trappist-1d), the planets would be tidally locked to the Sun, with one side always facing it, much like the Moon always faces one side to the Earth. This means that this Earthlike temperature would be the daily temperature nearly every day on the sunny side, at the equator, and it would get steadily colder as you went out to the dark side -- but how much colder depends tremendously on how thick an atmosphere the planet has. It could be anything from hundreds of degrees below zero, the temperature of exposed space, if the planet has no atmosphere, all the way up to inhabitable but chilly temperatures if the atmosphere is thick. (Further investigation will tell us more about this, since as the planet passes in front of its star, we can see which colors of light are absorbed and how much by its atmosphere)

Weather patterns on tidally locked planets are unusual; if you want a sense of it, you can consider this paper (https://arxiv.org/pdf/1109.2668.pdf) about what tidal locking would do to it. This may well cause the climate to be so unstable that the planet could never evolve life; we'll have to do more science to figure that out.

The two further-out planets are a bit less hospitable; Trappist-1e averages 251K (21C, 8F), roughly the weather of winter in Fairbanks, and 1f averages a chilly 219K (-54C, -65F), the sort of weather you associate with central Antarctica.

This means that 1dians, if they developed short-range space travel, would be able to travel to these places, but absent some really good reason, they would be more likely to be the home of isolated outposts than major settlements. (Given the small size of this system - planets closely packed around a tiny star - this is far easier to reach than Mars is for us; at closest approach, 1d and 1e are less than three times as far apart as the Earth is from the Moon. During this peak, 1e would be huge in 1d's sky, about 20% bigger than the full Moon is in our own. But you would never see this from the light side; at closest approach, 1e is "behind" 1d, with the full 1e visible only at the center of the dark side. The inhabitants of the light side of 1d would see it only through half-phase, before it sank below the horizon.)

There are far more calculations like this we could do (especially since we apparently have information about their relative orbital periods, which would let us chart the skies there in somewhat more detail) but I have actual work to do...
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