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C Powell (UV Publisher)
Independent Book Publisher @ www.undergroundvoices.com
Independent Book Publisher @ www.undergroundvoices.com
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C's posts

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A wonderful blurb on Underground Voices' author, Michael C. Keith:

"Michael Keith is doing his part to keep the short story alive in this world of novel, novel, novel . . . Let us hope he keeps those original stories coming." –– Brad Watson, Guggenheim Fellow and National Book Award nominee

Michael C. Keith's short story collection, THE COLLECTOR OF TEARS, is an excellent collection. https://www.amazon.com/Collector-Tears-Michael-C-Keith/dp/0983045674/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1487770831&sr=8-7&keywords=the+collector+of+tears

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Coming up in March is Jim Meirose's very haunting, very disturbing, and very good short: INFERNO.

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Love getting crazy postcards from Underground Voices' writers. Thanks Cody.

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Here is an excerpt from Ralph Bland's novella, Super Sport. It comes out mid-April.

"When he wakes up he can tell it is early afternoon by the way the sun’s rays slant against the shades by the room’s only window. He gets up and sits on the side of the bed for a minute, toying with the feeling in his chest that he had better be ready and prepared for what this night has to offer. A part of him says to get his things together right now and go and check out and go back to Clarksville before the sun starts to set, but there is also that part of him that says if he does that he might as well fold all his cards forever and go check in at an old age home where everybody makes all his decisions for him, because he is effectively announcing that he isn’t a man anymore and he can’t take care of what life throws at him like he had when he was young and virile and nothing scared him whatsoever, not even the barrel of a gun. He isn’t going to start spending the rest of his life with his tail tucked between his legs. Not today at least, that’s for sure. Not in the middle of a vacation he’s been looking forward to for a while. And not in front of the only family he has left in the world, who’d all want to know why he’d beat it out of town so fast and hadn’t come by for Easter dinner.

But he still has that feeling inside him. He feels the urge to stop traveling the road he is going down and turn off in another direction and leave the events and circumstances of this life to someone else. Let somebody else worry about Marie and Chuck Corlew from now on, and let him move on down the highway to something far more pleasant. It wouldn’t be a crime for him to leave this all behind, now would it?

He looks at his satchel and his suitcase lying on the dresser, and the temptation to take off fills him almost to the gills, threatening to overflow in his body and turn him into a quivering mass of jelly. He doesn’t like this unfamiliar feeling of being frightened, of huddling in a strange darkened motel room miles from home and quaking like a little boy getting ready to receive his first spanking. What is he, a little baby? He’s been to war. He’s been threatened and shot at and had people after him before. This is nothing new. He doesn’t know what in the hell is wrong with him. He is just going to have to be a man and face this shit down. He’ll be all right. He’s had worse stuff than this come at him before."

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The monthly donation came in to Underground Voices today. Still surprised (and always touched) even though it has been coming in for years now.


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Daniel Wade's ebook, Iceberg Relief, comes out in a few days. It explores the real kidnapping of the MV Iceberg 1 ship that was kidnapped by Somali pirates.

Here is a possible cover.
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Sending off the Super Sport galley for reviews. The novella, by Ralph Bland, comes out mid-April.
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An excellent interview with Wendy J. Fox is out over at English Kills Review. One of the things that struck me in the interview is why agents rejected the novel: "Nice writing, but sorry, readers will hate your main character." Yet, there are unlikable main characters in Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment", Albert Camus' "The Stranger", etc, etc. Even Holden Caulfield in "Catcher in the Rye" is pretty unlikable, in my opinion. So is this really justification to reject a novel?

My own reasons for publishing this novel was BECAUSE of the main character. I didn't agree with her choices and knew that I would have made different choices in her situation. But that's what kept me reading. I wanted to know how she resolved her dilemmas and I wanted to know how Wendy J. Fox would conclude the novel. And what I was looking for was an end that felt organic and not contrived.

Anyway, enough said. Here is the link to the interview. There are also some great insights into larger publishing companies versus smaller ones:
http://englishkillsreview.com/an-interview-with-wendy-fox/

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Exploring different covers for Daniel Wade's upcoming ebook, "Iceberg Relief"...

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