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Where Trusted Contractors Bid For Your Business
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Get your car installations done through trusted local contractors found on Value/hands.com!

LoJack is one of the most famous examples of car security that uses radio tracking to hunt down and recover stolen vehicles. Most tracking devices share the same principal: Small transceivers are hidden somewhere inside the car and can be tracked by an outside source tuned to the proper frequency. Because GPS receivers require line-of-sight to an orbiting satellite to acquire a positioning fix, systems like the LoJack have the advantage of tracking cars in some places GPS will fail.
Due to close ties with law enforcement organizations, LoJack homing devices actually show up in police computer systems. LoJack units are tied to a car's unique vehicle identification number (VIN), so when a car is reported stolen and the VIN is entered into the state police crime computer, that automatically triggers the LoJack Unit in the vehicle [source: LoJack].
And LoJack stands by its product with a 24-hour recovery guarantee. Basically, if your car is stolen and can't be found within 24 hours, you get your money back -- for the LoJack, anyway [source: LoJack]. The downside to LoJack's police partnership is that the recovery system is only good in certain counties in the United States -- and it's expensive. The basic version of LoJack costs $695, but owning one could potentially save you up to 35 percent on automobile insurance [source: LoJack].
Now that we've touched on OnStar and LoJack, two of the biggest names in car security, let's take a look at how BMW competes against GM's OnStar juggernau
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Car Alarm System- check out ValueHands.com for all your car services needs. Bid on the job posted and get paid.

Cars are expensive. Other than a house, perhaps, few purchases we make will compare to a new car. And just like any other expensive asset, a car brings with it a secondary cost -- the risk of theft. In some laid-back parts of the world, locking the doors may be enough to ward off the threat. Everywhere else, it's a good idea to arm yourself -- and your car -- with some security.
On the bright side, car thefts have been steadily decreasing in recent years; fewer than 1 million cars were stolen in the United States in 2009 [source: NICB]. That's the lowest number in two decades, and car security has come a long way during that time period. For instance, more than 30 car models from General Motors come equipped with OnStar, a car safety device that provides everything from turn-by-turn navigation to stolen vehicle tracking and remote ignition blocking [source: OnStar]. Technological marvel that it is, OnStar's just the tip of the iceberg -- a bevy of high-tech car security systems track cars via GPS or radio, and can even kill the ignition from afar.
Modern security systems run the gamut from pre-installed helpful components like OnStar to top-of-the-line options like LoJack. Read on to learn about 10 amazing car security systems, including affordable everyday solutions, military Smartrucks and DNA-recognition systems straight out of the future.
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Young people have never before been so technologically savvy and interconnected, with so much time on their hands and so little money in their pockets, as they are now. There have always been disgruntled youth who fight the establishment and their parents for change and strike out against the old regimes in favor of new freedoms. But in the 21st century, a global recession, lack of opportunity and lack of hope for the youth are practically boiling over -- or, at least, are simmering and ready to explode.
People between the ages of 16 and 24, and ranging from the unschooled to those with doctorate-level educations, are coming up in a world where they may be stuck at home and without job prospects for years. All of this discontent may breed organized anarchy or rebellion in the form of technological or infrastructure sabotage, either physically or in cyberspace.
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Neurohacking
Will there be a day when you say "I can't read your mind, you know!" and the reply will be "Oh, stop it -- of course you can!"? It could happen. Neuroscientists are finding ways to read people's minds with machines, and although this has been in the works for decades, real progress is being made by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and elsewhere. Translating electrical activity from the brain by means of decoding brainwaves is one way to help sufferers of dementia, for example, who have complications with neurotransmitters relaying thoughts into comprehensible speech or holding thoughts long enough to get them out verbally before they're forgotten.
On the other hand, it is more than a little frightening to know that science and machines could soon have access to our innermost thoughts. Implications for neurohacking into people's thoughts have also been studied in relation to neuromarketing, which targets people's brains by manipulating their wants and desires through marketing and advertising. Our thoughts and actions could actually be hijacked by a form of media that makes us think we're getting what we want, when really, we're going for something our brains may only think is supposed to be good [sources: IGF; Carmichael].
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Criticism of Google Glass has often focused on the way its camera makes surreptitious video recording too easy. Now researchers have shown that footage captured by the face-mounted camera could also pose a security threat.

Software developed by the researchers can automatically recover the passcodes of people recorded on video as they type in their credentials, even when the screen itself is not visible to the camera. The attack works by watching the movement of the fingers to work out what keys they are touching. It also works on footage from camcorders, webcams, and smartphones, but Glass offers perhaps the subtlest way to stage it.


The work suggests that “shoulder surfing”—stealing passwords or other data by watching someone at a computer—could become more of a threat as digital cameras and powerful image processing software become more common.

In tests where people stood three meters away from the camera, the software was around 90 percent accurate at capturing four-character-long strings typed on the iPhone’s QWERTY keyboard. The researchers say that the method could theoretically reconstruct a short e-mail or SMS.

“With Glass it’s very sneaky,” says Qinggang Yue, a grad student at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, who carried out the research with colleagues Xinwen Fu and Zhen Ling.

When Yue met with MIT Technology Review at the Black Hat security conference, where he had presented his findings on Wednesday, he glanced around the busy press room and instantly identified a handful of people pecking away on touch screens that might be vulnerable to such an attack.

Yue has also shown that video footage can be used to recover passcodes at some distance. In one set of experiments, a camcorder held by someone at a first-floor window was used to successfully capture the passcode of someone using an iPad just over 43 meters away. “With a long-focal-length camera it could be much further,” says Yue.

To capture a passcode, the software must identify the position and orientation of a device’s screen as well as the position of a person’s fingertips tapping on it. Yue and colleagues used machine learning to train software to tackle both those problems. The software runs on a PC, so footage captured with Google Glass must be downloaded to extract any passcodes.

The software automatically finds a device captured in a piece of footage. It then identifies the position of its screen’s four corners, and tracks the velocity of a person’s fingertip.

The researchers are currently testing ways to defend against such software-enhanced shoulder surfing. One countermeasure involves randomly swapping the keys on a standard keypad around, so that software can’t correctly translate each tap. Another involves h
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Not long ago, we ran a feature about Samsung’s striking new curved TVs, a mostly-aesthetic form-factor which has drawn both praise and vitriol from the public for its gimmicky nature. But if you can’t decide whether the curved craze is your cup of tea – and you happen to live in Korea – there’s no longer any need to choose: Samsung has announced that it will soon take orders for its stranger-than-fiction bendable TV in its home country starting August 1.
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