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Lulu Pavone
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Maria Luiza was a great lady... she used to be at Contemporânea's choro-sessions every Saturday morning biding her time until she'd be called by one of the musicians to sing a couple of her favourite songs which invariably featured one of Isaurinha Garcia's old hits like 'Aperto de mão', 'O sorriso do Paulinho' or 'De conversa em conversa'. 

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Snapshots of miscelaneous Brazilian acts from the 1950s... Luely Figueiró, Maysa, Baden Powell, Johnny Alf, Duo Guarujá, Wanderley Cardoso, Meire Pavão, Genival Melo, Orlando Silva, Wanderlea, Roberto Luna, Gilda de Barros & others... 

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King Momus aka Rei Momo was King during the Carnaval celebrations in Brazil during the 50s & 60s. He was usually impersonated by a fat middle-aged white man with an androgynous face. Here are the two most popular Rei Momos Braziians revered in those times: Nelson Nobre & Abrahão Reis... Long live the King Momus !!! 

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There was a time circa 1962-1963 that Moacyr Franco had the Midas touch... it all started when he recorded 'Suave é a noite', a cover of 'Tender in the night' in late 1962... then he had a top-rating TV show and 2 more #1s in the nation: 'Que será de ti?' and 'Doce amargura', a modified cover of 'More' from 'Mondo Cane'... 

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'Não sabemos' (We don't know) was Leila Silva's biggest hit ever. She was born in Manaus-AM but had grew up in Santos-SP. She was one of the lucky few who was at the right place - Chantecler's recording studios - at the right time - when guitarrist Poly was in one of his inspired moments - and had the right tune waiting to be recorded. 'Não sabemos' was released in late 1960 and was #1 by December. It was a most unusual recording... it was an 'old-fashioned' samba that would fit more in the 1940s than in the last year of the 1950s... but it caught people's imagination and it was a sensation... 

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Laura Suarez was a Brazilian singer & actress who tried to break into the US market while Carmen Miranda was living in Hollywood. Miss Suarez sang at some NBC Radio programmes but soon returned to Brazil where she had a long career in the theatre... By the way, Laura was born on 21st November 1909... just 9 months apart from Carmen Miranda.... 

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Diogo Mulero aka Palmeira was one of the unsung heroes of Brazilian phonographic industry. Palmeira grew up an illiterate boy having taught himself how to read and write. He was born in Agudos-SP and after having started duos and trios, finally settled with Biá in 1956. They recorded 'Boneca cobiçada' which turned Brazilian country music topsy-turvy... it was actually a cross-over hit. Soon after that Palmeira left performing to become an A&P man for RCA Victor. By 1959, Palmeira became the strong man Chantecler a new independent label. Two years later Chantecler could compete on an equal footing with multinationals like RCA, Columbia and EMI. Palmeira left Chantecler to go to Continental Records that soon was revived and very competitive again. 

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RGE acronym for Radio Gravações Elétricas which actually should have been Gravações Elétricas para o Radio - well never mind the Anglicism! - was set up at Rua Paula Souza, in Sao Paulo - the same building where Radio Bandeirantes - the most popular radio station stood - to cater for the growing market of commercial jingles for radio stations around Brazil. Jose Scatena had managed to acquired state-of-the-art recording equipament from the U.S.A. and realized he could enter the pop music market as well. That was 1956. By 1960 RGE was a great label... by 1964 it produced the best selling album in the country... 'O Fino da Bossa'... 

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When Gene Raymond bum became the centre of attraction in the 1933 movie 'Flying down to Rio'... 

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Brazilian middle-class have never forgiven Carmen Miranda for what they perceived as her 'class-betrayal'. Carmen was portrayed in Hollywood as a 'Latina' which made this middle-class very uncomfortable. It was annoying to be reminded that Brazilians were NOT white as they thought they were... 
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