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Robert Jacobson
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2,910 followers
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I just made my second contribution to ANTLR4 by adding a single name to an import statement, a total of 13 characters inserted. Thus I have increased my contribution to the ANTLR4 project by a factor of -13.
With my interest in computer science and how much I like programming and open source software, it's a little surprising that I haven't contributed anything to a major open source software project. 

Until today. I submitted a pull request today for antlr4, a sophisticated compiler technology. My contribution was the deletion of a single character. It fixed a bug. :)
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I have been having a lot of fun working with my colleague Andrew Rhyne and the rest of the team on the Automated Shipment Forensics project in collaboration with the +New England Aquarium and +Roger Williams University. Here's a video about what I've been working on lately. When he says, "bring in some support on the analytical side developing some of these algorithms for detecting new illegal trade," he's talking about this good lookin' guy right here.
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In 1944 Harold Fisk completed the task of mapping the ghosts of the Mississippi river bed for the US Army Corps of Engineers. His maps are incredible and are preserved in high resolution online for us to enjoy forever. Reddit user u/NelsonMinar created an interactive map overlay:
http://www.somebits.com/fiskmap/#9.00/31.0768/-91.5979
(Satellite view is broken, click terrain.) One can see how the river bed has changed since Fisk drew his maps in 1944!

The original source is from the US Army Corps of Engineers:
http://lmvmapping.erdc.usace.army.mil/.
The Nerdist article references a more user friendly source:
http://www.radicalcartography.net/?fisk
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Originally shared by ****
This paper took 3 years to publish w/ acknowledgments; accepted for scientific content by other journals, but rejected for acknowledgement.

A JHEP Editor said: '...in a scientific paper we discuss about science, not about life.'

To reject a paper that passes peer review for scientific content &, in the acknowledgements, makes a plea for compassion&change is shameful.
@ClaireRosten, wife of the author of the below paper.

https://twitter.com/ClaireRosten/status/889818776878944256

Paper: https://doi.org/10.1140/epjc/s10052-017-5049-5
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Teaching Complex Analysis With A Spherical Camera. Here are the slides!
#MAA #MathFest2017
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Below is my response to a recent invitation for me to share my thoughts about how the grad program I earned my Ph.D. in might improve their program. These comments are probably applicable to virtually every mathematics Ph.D. program.

Looking back, I recognize that a lot of my peers in grad school suffered from depression and isolation. Grad school is by definition an unbalanced time in one's life. But I wonder if there is more the department could do to decrease the uncertainty students face about what is expected of them, what their path to graduation is, and so forth. This is easier said than done, but surely many other programs have faced this problem and found things that help. Maybe regular panel discussions about topics like: how to find and choose an advisor, strategies for post-qual research, stories of how others have successfully navigated their graduate experience, how to manage finances as a grad student, etc. That's just one idea. It's easy to feel extremely isolated as a grad student. After I graduated, I started talking to my grad school friends about the psychological and emotional challenges we faced. I was fascinated to learn that my peers' experiences were much closer to my own than I knew. Many of them were on anxiety and antidepressant meds, a few experienced divorce or other significant strains in their personal relationships, some related serious hardships dealing with their advisors (for a variety of reasons)... and these are my peers that have been the most successful, graduating, landing excellent jobs, and running into me at the Joint Math Meetings.

It is part of the culture of mathematicians to exclude our personal stories and experiences from our professional presentation of ourselves, and senior faculty are often especially averse to attending to the non mathematical part of the graduate experience. It seems to me, though, that earning a PhD in mathematics today is a very different experience from earning one in 1973, and supporting students in non mathematical ways is not only the humane thing to do, it benefits mathematics and improves the quality of mathematicians the program produces. I'm probably preaching to the choir, here.
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When you surf the web looking for new ways to spice up your first semester calculus course but wander into the wrong part of town...
or
Secrets revealed: How mathematicans really talk to each other about adaptive online learning...
or
How to name your algorithm the night of the submission deadline.
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Gyroid made from a single shape of developable strip
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13/04/2017
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Are you in the market for a new calculator? Don't settle for those cheap 8 digit knockoffs!
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Science funding should be a political no brainer. An abundance of commercial spinoffs and jobs, a more technically capable workforce, advances in health and quality of life galore, a leg up in the international economy... every industry and every person enjoys tremendous returns on society's investment in science. This shouldn't be a partisan issue.
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