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Kim Jaxon
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http://kimjaxon.com
http://kimjaxon.com

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Hey nice people,

Make sure if you're using Google Slides or Docs that you have your share settings set to "anyone with the link can view" Thanks!
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Hey everyone, here's an example of a response to this Language Arts article from last semester that you may find helpful (from Kellie). Hoping you can spend some time with the ideas in the article...

This article hit me right in my ooey gooey heart. Seriously, I was teary eyed from about the halfway point through to the very end. I love that these children were learning about writing in a unique and dynamic way, but I loved most that they were connecting with their work in a way that was therapeutic; that it gave them characters to identify with and helped them outwardly process things they hadn’t been able to prior. That’s some powerful stuff! And I love how these moving, playing, acting, painting, creating pieces of this particular integrated learning odyssey gave these children different ways to invest themselves in learning about the piece they’re studying and themselves because I totally agree with Jane Gilrain that everyone is more connected to something they’ve invested themselves in, whether it’s classic literature, writing poetry, collecting baseball cards, or marathon running. If you have passion for it, you’ll be more involved in pursuing it. And at the end of the day, isn’t inspiring a passion for learning one of our biggest and most rewarding challenges as teachers?

And I love the patchwork way in which Jane Gilrain approached her article. It was creative, entertaining, beautiful, and stirring and perfectly reflected the integration of art and language employed in her classroom. While I did at times struggle with switching gears from one mode to the next, along with my spotty memory of The Odyssey in relation to some of the references, I really enjoyed each segment and those pieces written by her students. I could definitely see myself employing this multimodal approach in a class of any age.

I was also, again, struck with the fact that these children were reading a classic piece of literature that I struggled with in high school. And although they read a Mary Pope Osborn version of the story, the concepts within are big, adult sorts of concepts. This was again an instance where children are absorbing, processing and understanding more than they are typically given credit for. In addition, I was struck again with how although the format for our class is different, we as a class are doing some of the same kinds of integrated and cathartic work. And lastly, I loved how Gilrain borrowed crafting techniques from her favorite authors in composing her poems. It’s nice to know that they pros do it openly too!

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Hi everyone: Just so it's handy, here's the link again to your assigned picture book author (first column next to your name). Here's the assignment from our Assignments page on our website:

I will randomly assign you a picture book author. Find books by that author in CSUC children’s book collection, Butte County Library, Barnes and Noble, Amazon, etc. You can even find most of the books through the author's website or look for the books being read through youtube videos. 

Resource: Create a resource for us (a Google Slideshow, a Prezi, a website, a video of you talking about the author and reading from some of the books, a lesson plan) that we could refer to as a resource in our future classroom.

No matter the format you choose, your resource should include the following parts in whatever order makes sense to you:

--Show us book titles, author info, awards, interviews or videos with the author
--Give us a feel for the books (link to a video of one of the books being read or you reading from the books or links to sample pages from the publisher or the author website)
--Explore how we might use the book or books to anchor a class plan or activity. How could we use the book(s)? Find resources for lesson plans (be sure to give credit to where you found the lesson plan and say why you like it) OR share an activity that you create with the book as the anchor. 

You'll share your resource in our Google+ Community under the Picture Book subheading. You can complete this assignment anytime before Oct 26.  Here is the link to show which picture book author you've been assigned. All authors are Caldecott winners.

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I shared this with Keith, but thought perhaps others of you might find this helpful for working with the TED talk:
Here's my take aways from the TED talk: I think there is huge power in the stories we tell and whose stories are retold (and importantly, who get to tell the story). A fictional story can sometimes help us with our own struggles or find empathy for people whose stories are different from our own. One of my Berkeley colleagues created a curriculum that is used in Rwanda and Bosnia in a post genocide world. In Bosnia and Rwanda, educators were grappling with history and how to teach it when the wounds were so so raw; they turned to stories from the holocaust (like Number the Stars, Milkweed, Anne Frank's Diary, etc) so that the issues could be discussed using the stories from another place and time. They could then make connections to their own lives in ways that start the healing process.

On a practical level, I love Barnett's invitation to create a liminal space where new possibilities can be imagined...new identities are possible. A dear friend of mine teaches elementary school and each year she transforms her classroom on the first day. One year kids will enter a jungle straight out of Where the Wild Things Are and other years they enter a wild west adventure land. They tell stories around "campfires" made of twinkle lights. They get to imagine becoming different kinds of people through these stories. It seems to me that one amazing possibility of school is that it can be a place that is not quite home, not quite out in the "real" world, so it can be a safe space to try on ideas, try on ways of being, try on things you might want to do.

FWIW. ;-)

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I am very excited to work together this semester! So, here is my introduction to y'all:

I'm from Chico. Born in nearby Willows, CA, but I've lived in or near Chico since I was two. I went to Hooker Oak elementary, Chico Jr, Chico High, and then received my BA and MA from Chico State in English. I went on to get my PhD in Education (Language & Literacy) from UC, Berkeley, and then could not believe it when a faculty position opened up in my field at Chico State as I was finishing the PhD. It is so unusual to get to stay in your home town as a tenured faculty person in higher education. I love my life at Chico State and feel such a connection to the campus, community, and students. I know how lucky I am to get to do what I do everyday. And, for those of you in the online program, if you make it to Chico, check out our new Arts & Humanities building; it is stunning and a beautiful space to study and work.

I study literacy: mainly the teaching of reading and writing with an eye toward digital literacies. I've also worked for the past few years with science faculty, thinking about the teaching of writing in science. We have a book, Composing Science, to support faculty in teaching science writing. I think a lot about maker culture and the connections between making and composing. This summer, I gave a talk on those ideas at the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge. Love to talk about the teaching writing and I have a passion for children's books and buy way too many of them!
http://www.composingscience.com/

Finally, I have an amazing partner, Jeff. We've been married for 18 years and live on 40 acres about 20 minutes from Chico. We have grown children (from my previous marriage, but Jeff is really dad): Ash and Nick who are 28 and 26. All of my family--cousins, aunts, parents--live within 30 minutes. My kids are 6th generation in this area. Again, so lucky to get to stay near my home town.

I am committed to access and equity in public education and will spend my career working to amplify student voices. I write for the Connected Learning Alliance; you can find ideas about teaching I've written about here: https://clalliance.org/person/kim-jaxon/
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Hello everyone!

I am very excited to work together this semester! So, here is my introduction to y'all:

Part I:
I'm from Chico. Born in nearby Willows, CA, but I've lived in or near Chico since I was two. I went to Hooker Oak elementary, Chico Jr, Chico High, and then received my BA and MA from Chico State in English. I went on to get my PhD in Education (Language & Literacy) from UC, Berkeley, and then could not believe it when a faculty position opened up in my field at Chico State as I was finishing the PhD. It is so unusual to get to stay in your home town as a tenured faculty person in higher education. I love my life at Chico State and feel such a connection to the campus, community, and students. I know how lucky I am to get to do what I do everyday. And, for those of you in the online program, if you make it to Chico, check out our new Arts & Humanities building; it is stunning and a beautiful space to study and work.

I study literacy: mainly the teaching of reading and writing with an eye toward digital literacies. I've also worked for the past few years with science faculty, thinking about the teaching of writing in science. We have a book, Composing Science, to support faculty in teaching science writing. I think a lot about maker culture and the connections between making and composing. This summer, I gave a talk on those ideas at the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge. Love to talk about the teaching writing and I have a passion for children's books and buy way too many of them!
http://www.composingscience.com/

Finally, I have an amazing partner, Jeff. We've been married for 18 years and live on 40 acres about 20 minutes from Chico. We have grown children (from my previous marriage, but Jeff is really dad): Ash and Nick who are 28 and 26. All of my family--cousins, aunts, parents--live within 30 minutes. My kids are 6th generation in this area. Again, so lucky to get to stay near my home town.

I am committed to access and equity in public education and will spend my career working to amplify student voices. I write for the Connected Learning Alliance; you can find ideas about teaching I've written about here: https://clalliance.org/person/kim-jaxon/

Part II:
In terms of my own literacies, I spend most of my day reading and writing. I wake up in the morning, rub the sleep out of my eyes, and check Instagram, Twitter, and sometimes Facebook (although Twitter is my go to). I often read an article from a colleague that has been linked on Twitter first thing in the morning; I follow so many educators on Twitter that I get a lot of resources from that platform. After coffee, it's all about email, prep, and a million kinds of writing: grants, reports, articles, blogs, tweets, etc. And I make A TON OF LISTS. Lists keep me sane. I have large post-it notes hanging in my office with the month's tasks and deadlines. I make a new one each month. I send a lot of texts to family and truly hate talking on the phone.

I see my literacies as a way to connect to friends and family, as a way to have ideas heard, and sometimes as a organization and memory tool. I mainly use all things digital: creating websites, movies, google docs, tweets, images on Instagram, etc. But I do have a piece of paper in front of me for jotting quick notes in front of the keypad on my computer. I see these various tools--paper, pen, keypads, screens--as not better or worse ways to read and write, but various tools that serve various functions. I hope we allow our young writers to use the tools that make sense to them, but also offer up new tools to try on.

I look forward to writing together this semester! Kim


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8/26/18
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Walking to the mailbox in anticipation. #sixwordstories #cwpdld #DLDay
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Seriously team 47: y'all blew this assignment out of the park. I am grateful for you all and how thoughtful you approach the work. Thank you.

Hey group, you did a really great job with the make assignment! But I think all of you need to complete part 2:
**Important: Once you share your Make in G+ (upload photo, link, etc), then tell us about your process of making: what were you going for with your make? what worked out? what was challenging? What do you hope people take away from viewing, reading, hearing your make?
Thank you!

Hey group, since I seem to be adding this to everyone's post...please remember to add this part:
**Important: Once you share your Make in G+ (upload photo, link, etc), then tell us about your process of making: what were you going for with your make? what worked out? what was challenging? What do you hope people take away from viewing, reading, hearing your make?
You all did stunning work with this project!
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