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Tony Demetriou
828 followers -
Pretty awesome, but not as awesome as he thinks
Pretty awesome, but not as awesome as he thinks

828 followers
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As there appears to be a google+ exodus, and I'm not on most social media things... here's where to find me.

Email: Tony.demetriou - at that g mail place -
MeWe: mewe.com/i/tony.demetriou
Discord: Silvarilon#0379 (I think? Haven't added friends before?)

Are plusporia, mastodon and the others worthwhile?
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Yeah, I’ve done a stellar job of parenting...
Random Parent: WOW, you REALLY want that (polar) bear.
Alex: I really do. His name is Whitey, and I’m trying to convince my stupid parents to buy him for me.
Me: Hey, I’m not your parent!
Alex: ... (raises eyebrow suggestively) But... you... are stupid?
Me: It’s been a long day.
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Video card would crash when the GPU hit 105 degrees. Idled around 80 degrees when not doing much 3D graphics, and would consistently rise until that crash when running games.

New thermal paste on the GPU, rose up to 79 degrees almost immediately... shuffled the case, and now it's dropped again, seems to have settled at 70. So that's an immediate 10 degrees difference. Hurray!

Now to discover whether using the GPU will crash, or whether the paste is enough to keep it (ideally) under 100.

(Yeah, I know these numbers are really high, but 1) It's a Quadro 4000, that naturally runs hot, and is meant to have built-in slowdowns when it hits 100 deg. and 2) It's summer in Australia. I wouldn't be surprised if the room ambient temperature is 70 degrees.)

Any ideas on how to lower the temp further?

- I foolishly didn't get any thermal pads when I got the paste, since I probably should have also replaced them. That won't reduce the GPU temp, but if it's this hot I probably should sort that out to avoid any damage.

- The GPU fan is really quiet, so I can probably crank that up higher.

- I could force the clock speed lower. But that seems lame. If it's getting hot, that's because it's doing something, and I want that performance if I can get it.

- I'm using Ubuntu, so the NVidia drivers aren't the super best. I'm mostly only pushing the card when doing unity development (and hopefully soon some 3D modelling) and playing the occasional game. The rest of the time, I'm just using standard desktop stuff.
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+Heidi Demetriou Here's the same study, but with details of a follow-on study that included female participants.

Results supported the initial study.

https://healthcare.utah.edu/publicaffairs/news/2018/11/anderson-autism.php
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At Dinner en Blanc here in Sydney.
This year it’s right in the middle of the city.
PhotoPhotoPhoto
17/11/2018
3 Photos - View album
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Warning: Grammar + comics nerdery. Just skip to the end if you want cat pictures. After all, this is the internet.

So, I was sharing this fan art, and for some reason noticed that Ant-Man uses the Spider-Man hyphen, which got me thinking wondering if there's some underlying unstated convention for when to use the hyphen.

Spidey got his hyphen so that "Spider-" and "Man" could be on two different lines on the cover, to avoid looking like the word "Superman" from a distance.

So the hyphen seems unique to Spidey. When we don't use the hyphen, what's the convention?

We have two word names like Power Man. Which are super common.
Iron Man, Mole Man, Molecule Man... seems to be the standard when we describe a character by their power or affinity.

... and we have combined names like Sandman.

OK, Sandman is a special case, because it's a double-reference and the existing name was already one word. But what about Iceman? Seems to also be an existing name for that neolithic body. Same with Doorman, Hitman, Swordsman etc.

Ironheart gets one word, while Iron Man gets two. But Ironheart doesn't end in "-man" or "-girl" so a compound word makes sense to avoid us thinking that she's literally got a heart made from iron. (Iron Fist does have a fist like iron. While Ironheart's heart is figuratively strong, rather than literally strong.) Anyway... interested in "-man" suffix right now, rather than body part suffixes.

So in Marvel land, compound names seem to exist because they're either an existing word or name, or to avoid ambiguity. Although there are still exceptions...

In DC land, we regularly get compound names like Superman, Batman, Aquaman. Superman was a compound name because it was borrowed from a German compound word, and was the start of the "-man" naming scheme. When he first appeared Batman was sometimes Bat-Man and sometimes "The Batman", and the cover had a gap between the words, but no hyphen. So it's really unclear, but over time it settled to Batman, probably because it was following Superman. And the rest of the DC characters probably followed that convention.

We've also got "-woman" as a suffix. Which seems to follow similar rules to "-man", whatever those rules might be.
We've got Invisible Woman, but also Spider-Woman.

OK, so those are the non-hyphen names.

But it still doesn't explain most of the hyphen names, because almost all of the hyphen names still fit into one of these existing patterns. Why Ant-Man and not Ant Man or Antman? Why Machine Man and not Machine-Man?

Let's tackle the easy hyphen names. Anything starting with "Man" gets a hyphen. Man-Thing. Man-Wolf, etc. - That's necessary because of normal grammar rules, because adjectives come before nouns.

... and some special cases like Janus the Nega-Man, where the hyphen is needed because of the grammar structure. Or X-Man, where the hyphen matches the "X-Men" team name. And anyway, it'd look super weird as "X Man" or "XMan". Psycho-Man probably needs the hyphen because otherwise "psycho" seems like a description of his mental health rather than a power.

At least we've whittled the list down. Let's look at what's left in Marvel:
Ant-Man, Frog-Man, Giant-Man, Giant-Girl, Hydro-Man, Spider-Man, Spider-Girl, Spider-Woman, Stilt-Man...

So... what's the pattern? I think the pattern is "proximity to Spider-Man." - It seems that you carry the hyphen through two degrees of separation.

Spider-Girl and Spider-Woman are (almost) the only -girl and -woman names with a hyphen. They obviously got the hyphen so they'd match with Spidey.

Ant-Man is animal-based... heck insect-based... which seems to be why he follows the Spidey convention. Then carries the hyphen when he becomes Giant-Man. Ant-Man's daughter is Ant-girl and Giant-Girl. Frog-Man is both an animal and from the Spiderverse comics.

Hydro-Man comes from a Spider-Man comic (1981), so probably borrowed the hyphen. Interesting, because Sandman already existed as a Spidey villain.

Stilt-Man comes from Daredevil, but initial stories have him battling Spider-Man, and working with Electro and other Spidey villains. So maybe that counts as two degrees?

So... yeah. Seems to be that people throw the hyphen in whenever it "feels right", and that the more they associate the character they're creating with Spider-Man, or with another well-known character using the hyphen, the more it "feels right" to add the hyphen. But sometimes it "feels right" because leaving out the hyphen makes it feel wrong for some other reason.

What about DC characters? They're not associated with Spider-Man, so how can they get a hyphen?

Mostly they don't. We've got a few, but they all seem to fall into one of the special categories. Like Elasti-Girl is a contraction, and if she was Elastic Girl DC probably wouldn't have added the hyphen. Bat-Mite is inexplicable, but so is his character. Maybe it's to make the "Bat" part of his name stand out more?

So, long ramble over, I think I've discovered what I already knew in my nerdy heart. Spider-Man is unique and special. Even when doing grammar analysis!

http://geekxgirls.com/article.php?ID=10766
Marvel Cats Fan Art
Marvel Cats Fan Art
geekxgirls.com

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Warning: Grammar + comics nerdery. Just skip to the end if you want cat pictures. After all, this is the internet.

So, I was sharing this fan art, and for some reason noticed that Ant-Man uses the Spider-Man hyphen, which got me thinking wondering if there's some underlying unstated convention for when to use the hyphen.

Spidey got his hyphen so that "Spider-" and "Man" could be on two different lines on the cover, to avoid looking like the word "Superman" from a distance.

So the hyphen seems unique to Spidey. When we don't use the hyphen, what's the convention?

We have two word names like Power Man. Which are super common.
Iron Man, Mole Man, Molecule Man... seems to be the standard when we describe a character by their power or affinity.

... and we have combined names like Sandman.

OK, Sandman is a special case, because it's a double-reference and the existing name was already one word. But what about Iceman? Seems to also be an existing name for that neolithic body. Same with Doorman, Hitman, Swordsman etc.

Ironheart gets one word, while Iron Man gets two. But Ironheart doesn't end in "-man" or "-girl" so a compound word makes sense to avoid us thinking that she's literally got a heart made from iron. (Iron Fist does have a fist like iron. While Ironheart's heart is figuratively strong, rather than literally strong.) Anyway... interested in "-man" suffix right now, rather than body part suffixes.

So in Marvel land, compound names seem to exist because they're either an existing word or name, or to avoid ambiguity. Although there are still exceptions...

In DC land, we regularly get compound names like Superman, Batman, Aquaman. Superman was a compound name because it was borrowed from a German compound word, and was the start of the "-man" naming scheme. When he first appeared Batman was sometimes Bat-Man and sometimes "The Batman", and the cover had a gap between the words, but no hyphen. So it's really unclear, but over time it settled to Batman, probably because it was following Superman. And the rest of the DC characters probably followed that convention.

We've also got "-woman" as a suffix. Which seems to follow similar rules to "-man", whatever those rules might be.
We've got Invisible Woman, but also Spider-Woman.

OK, so those are the non-hyphen names.

But it still doesn't explain most of the hyphen names, because almost all of the hyphen names still fit into one of these existing patterns. Why Ant-Man and not Ant Man or Antman? Why Machine Man and not Machine-Man?

Let's tackle the easy hyphen names. Anything starting with "Man" gets a hyphen. Man-Thing. Man-Wolf, etc. - That's necessary because of normal grammar rules, because adjectives come before nouns.

... and some special cases like Janus the Nega-Man, where the hyphen is needed because of the grammar structure. Or X-Man, where the hyphen matches the "X-Men" team name. And anyway, it'd look super weird as "X Man" or "XMan". Psycho-Man probably needs the hyphen because otherwise "psycho" seems like a description of his mental health rather than a power.

At least we've whittled the list down. Let's look at what's left in Marvel:
Ant-Man, Frog-Man, Giant-Man, Giant-Girl, Hydro-Man, Spider-Man, Spider-Girl, Spider-Woman, Stilt-Man...

So... what's the pattern? I think the pattern is "proximity to Spider-Man." - It seems that you carry the hyphen through two degrees of separation.

Spider-Girl and Spider-Woman are (almost) the only -girl and -woman names with a hyphen. They obviously got the hyphen so they'd match with Spidey.

Ant-Man is animal-based... heck insect-based... which seems to be why he follows the Spidey convention. Then carries the hyphen when he becomes Giant-Man. Ant-Man's daughter is Ant-girl and Giant-Girl. Frog-Man is both an animal and from the Spiderverse comics.

Hydro-Man comes from a Spider-Man comic (1981), so probably borrowed the hyphen. Interesting, because Sandman already existed as a Spidey villain.

Stilt-Man comes from Daredevil, but initial stories have him battling Spider-Man, and working with Electro and other Spidey villains. So maybe that counts as two degrees?

So... yeah. Seems to be that people throw the hyphen in whenever it "feels right", and that the more they associate the character they're creating with Spider-Man, or with another well-known character using the hyphen, the more it "feels right" to add the hyphen. But sometimes it "feels right" because leaving out the hyphen makes it feel wrong for some other reason.

What about DC characters? They're not associated with Spider-Man, so how can they get a hyphen?

Mostly they don't. We've got a few, but they all seem to fall into one of the special categories. Like Elasti-Girl is a contraction, and if she was Elastic Girl DC probably wouldn't have added the hyphen. Bat-Mite is inexplicable, but so is his character. Maybe it's to make the "Bat" part of his name stand out more?

So, long ramble over, I think I've discovered what I already knew in my nerdy heart. Spider-Man is unique and special. Even when doing grammar analysis!

http://geekxgirls.com/article.php?ID=10766
Marvel Cats Fan Art
Marvel Cats Fan Art
geekxgirls.com
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Great article about the benefits and problems or large-scale computer systems, especially in terms of how designing a system like this makes it harder to adapt the work to the person doing it.

... And although there's no magic bullet, there are ways to sidestep these problems. The article correctly identifies many problems, but doesn't see that some of those problems do have win-win solutions. (Probably because conventional IT "best practices" don't see them either.)

There's a few examples of win-win, like the one about Neil R. Malhotra. The key point is how it allowed the "users" to become "creators." Or, as I usually describe it: The user is the expert, so the user decides what needs to be done. The system supported them doing their job, it didn't tell them how to do the job.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/11/12/why-doctors-hate-their-computers
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6yo wanted to go on an “adventure” walk, so he packed a bag with all the necessities:
- a torch
- 2 apples
- fake vampire teeth
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