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Sarah Kettell
3,229 followers -
Lover of nature, music, cooking, and written words. Perpetual thinker and learner.
Lover of nature, music, cooking, and written words. Perpetual thinker and learner.

3,229 followers
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This is great.

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A Game That Is Created to Be Hacked

This is a pretty cool idea. Turn the game into what you want it to be by actually altering the game itself, without needing the technical knowledge to do it the hard way.
In this Zelda-style game, you hack the source code with your sword http://wrd.cm/RrhC7D
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Udacity Will No Longer Offer Free Certificates

I can understand that employers would more likely consider verified certificates. I understand that we are not entitled for free courses or education, especially when it can help us in our career. However, I feel that they could have gone about this in a better way.

First of all, they currently have two course options: 1) a free option where you get access to the videos, projects, and auto-graded quizzes. 2) a paid option where you get access to the same as the free, projects that are human graded, a real coach, and a verified certificate.

The cost of the paid option? It depends on the course, but it seems to average $150 per month, per course. If you can cram it all into one month, that's not a bad deal, right? But if you're working full time and have other commitments, it could end up taking you much longer. 

Do you know how much Coursera charges for a verified certificate? On average, $50. That's it. One time fee. Sure, you don't get the coach or human-graded projects (unless you count peer assessment), but that seems reasonable for them to check your identity for a PDF downloadable certificate. 

I think they should have offered a 3rd option, which only gives you the verified certificate part, at a lower fixed cost on par with Coursera. Not everyone needs or wants a personal coach. Not everyone can afford the cost of the full experience, especially if they wish to take more than one course or have limited time. Why should they have to pay for the extras just to get a certificate?

I have no problem with them having the full course option. I think it's wonderful and could definitely help people if they plan to use this for their careers. But it is not in line with the message Udacity started out with, from my opinion. 

What are your thoughts? Would you pay for this?

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Google Glass for $500 less!?

My husband is selling his Glass. It was only used a couple times for demonstration purposes, so it's in mint condition. Everything (even original packaging) is included.

The best part? It's $500 off original price with free shipping!

Please check it out if you're interested, or share it if you know someone who might be. :)

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Sometimes we all need to take some time to just stop and enjoy the view.

(Aside from when someone is going to take a photo and you look away from it, of course.)
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Awesome job opportunity! ;)
+LinkedIn is hiring for Senior Punch Card Programmer! http://ow.ly/vj6lm 

Level up your skill set with Intro to Punch Card Programming: http://ow.ly/vgCs0 
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For anyone interested in programming, this might be a fun course for you to check out. It uses python and has no prerequisites. Anyone can take it!

I'm currently taking another course, Internet History, Technology, and Security, from the same professor and absolutely love it. He's got a great teaching method and is very present to help out and improve the course as it runs. He also has a love for open education and allows for the materials in his courses to be reused as teaching materials. 

I'll be joining this one to see the way the material will be presented and to maybe help out a bit in the forums. :)

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What is a Dimension and Do We Actually Live in a 1D World?

This is probably one of the most interesting and intelligent discussions I've ever read in YouTube comments. The video itself is good enough, but the comments make you think.

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If you could have any game or tool that is controlled by the movement of your hands, what would it be?

Leap Motion is a neat tool that detects movements of all 10 fingers pretty accurately. Obviously it's not completely new technology and somewhat reminds me of Kinect, but it could open up a lot of opportunities for app developers because it works on a standard computer.

What ideas come to mind that it could be used for?

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Browser-based VM that lets you program in a bunch of languages without needing to install anything locally, plus you can collaborate and share what you make. They even have a real Linux terminal to work in, if that's what you prefer.

Options to work with include: Ruby, Go, Java, NodeJS, PHP, C, Python, Wordpress, Laravel, Django, and Bootstrap. Among others.

Check it out!
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