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American Museum of Natural History
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From dinosaurs to deep space: science news from the Museum
From dinosaurs to deep space: science news from the Museum

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This rock records a time from the Earth's distant past when evolving life profoundly influenced the planet's evolution. The oxygen that is now in the Earth's atmosphere was not there at the beginning. Early life began to generate oxygen by converting the Sun's energy into food. That caused the iron that was dissolved in the oceans to precipitate out as iron oxide minerals. This rock, with its layers of red jasper and iron magnetite, was formed billions of years ago as part of that process. It is a reminder that life made our atmosphere breathable. #MineralMonday
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Planetary scientist Amanda Hendrix and science writer Charles Wohlforth highlight the developments and initiatives that have transformed the dream of space colonization into something that could become reality. The duo will discuss groundbreaking research and make the case that Saturn’s moon Titan offers the most realistic prospect for life without support from Earth. https://goo.gl/FgNJEi

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Catch up on #AMNHSciCafe as Mary Blair discusses her research on lorises! Join us for the next one on April 5: http://bit.ly/2mzU5Wu

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Mummification was practiced by numerous cultures in what is now Peru, beginning more than 7,000 years ago and allowed the living to remember, and remain connected with, the dead. Some people kept mummies in their homes or brought them to festivals. Others brought offerings of food or drink to their loved ones’ graves. The Chinchorro people, who lived in what is now Peru and Chile, were the world’s first practitioners of mummification, thousands of years before Egyptians. The Chinchorro painted the mummies they prepared black or red and added a wig. Making a mask would have been one of the last steps of the process. The sculptor covered the dead person’s skull with clay, fashioned a nose, eyes, and mouth, and then left it to dry. The masks rarely survived intact because unbaked clay is fragile—a modern sculptor made the mask below using ancient materials and methods. Pictured below is a replica of a Chinchorro mummy mask: http://bit.ly/2mZqdhy © 2015 The Field Museum, A115210d_029D, photographer John Weinstein

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Not far from the main island of Cuba, fish zip past coral studded with colorful starfish, sea fans, and sponges: http://bit.ly/2mZ8zuy

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Join us LIVE this morning as paleontologist Danny Barta discusses new research about the dinosaur family tree!
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Curious about the latest Dinosaur news? Tune in to our Facebook live this morning at 9:30 am ET!

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On #NationalPuppyDay we are taking a closer look at fossil dogs. This research heavily based on the Museum’s fossil dog collection—the largest of its kind in the world—shows how dogs evolved in response to a cooling, drying climate in North America over the last 40 million years: http://bit.ly/2mUy3t2

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"Mummy No. 30007, currently residing at the American Museum of Natural History, is a showstopper. She’s known as the Gilded Lady, for good reason: Her coffin, intricately decorated with linen, a golden headdress and facial features, has an air of divinity. She’s so well preserved that she looks exactly how the people of her time hoped she would appear for eternity. To contemporary scientists, however, it’s what they don’t see that is equally fascinating: Who was this ancient woman, and what did she look like when she was alive?" Read more about Mummies via The New York Times: http://nyti.ms/2mwilsP

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Congratulations to Cynthia Malone, Pacific Programs Manager at the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC), for being named one of the 50 most inspiring innovators by Grist: http://bit.ly/2mQt5xp
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