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Vanessa D. Fisher
258 followers -
Global Nomad
Global Nomad

258 followers
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Vanessa D.'s posts

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I've got a couple new podcasts up on my website for those interested. One with Diane Hamilton on skillfully navigating conflict and difference in life and in the workplace and some of the gender dimensions involved in that dance. The second with Cindy Wigglesworth exploring her work on Spiritual Intelligence and how she has applied it to the business setting, and a mutual exploration of how spiritual intelligence might relate to "Gender Intelligence".

My next interview will be in the coming weeks with Josh Levs, award-winning journalist and author of "All In: How Our Work-First Culture Fails Dads, Families, and Business" to discuss the structural and social barriers facing men and fathers in the workplace.

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My latest short blog explores why work-life balance is more than a women's issue. I look at generational shifts in the workforce that are leading to shifting values among millennials and discuss the challenges facing men and fathers in the modern workforce. All of this leading to why I believe we need to re-frame the discussion about work-life balance as a "people's issue"​ if we wish to create adequate workplace practices and policies for a rapidly changing work world.

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This past week, I had a quite extraordinary and unexpected opportunity as I was invited by the Canadian Association of Equality to sit on a panel discussion at the Premier screening of the Red Pill Documentary—a controversial and highly anticipated documentary about the Men’s Rights Movement. The panel also included film maker Cassie Jaye who was skyped in live. The event took place at the University of Toronto and was a sold out event and it was definitely the largest audience I’ve ever been invited to speak to about my views on the gender conversation. I've put together a video sharing some of my experiences from the event, as well as a longer review of the Red Pill documentary with both my praise and critiques of the film, some thoughts on where I hope to see the gender conversation go in the future, and a link to the recorded panel discussion.

I want to give a big shout out to Justin Trottier and Denise Fong and the rest of the CAFE crew for creating an open space for dialogue and debate about this film here in Toronto. I had a great time.



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In my video this week, which I've titled, “Why I’d Rather Be An Artist Than A Gender Activist”, I offer a response to a criticism I sometimes receive that I don’t take a strong enough stand on one side or the other of the gender debates. I explore why I hold my orientation more in the lineage of an artist/philosopher than a traditional gender activist and utilize the artistic work of one of my idols, European performance artist Marina Abramovic, to illustrate why I believe an artist's approach offers great value to any engagement we have in contentious and seemingly intractable social conflicts--whether we are talking about gender or any other topic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gK74UoTG-00

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Part Three in my video series on the wage gap aims to open a creative conversation about the future of work, money and gender. I start by discussing some of the current feminist arguments advocating that women be paid for their emotional labor as a way of closing the wage gap, and I share why I think these arguments are often myopic. At the same time, I utilize the "emotional labor" argument to dive into a deeper and wider discussion about the potentially powerful incentive for "re-valuing care" as a society in a way that could offer both men and women more work-life balance and more fulfilling lives. I finish by opening the floor for a creative discussion with you all about the future...

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This is the first of three videos that will tackle an investigation of the wage gap in an attempt to go beyond popular rhetoric and get underneath its underlying causes. This week’s video discusses the often quoted statistic that women earn 77 (or 79 or 82) cents on every man's dollar for the same work. Where does this statistic come from? And is it an accurate representation of gender discrimination in the workplace?
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