Profile

Cover photo
Bob Webber
Attended University of Toronto
Lived in Toronto, Ontario
160 followers|1,727 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1's

Stream

 
We are not yet free, the struggle continues.
 
50 years ago, today. Still brings tears.

Martin Luther King - I Have A Dream Speech - August 28, 1963
1
Add a comment...

Bob Webber

Shared publicly  - 
 
I want one, so you have to pay through the eyeballs!
 
We're giving away 40…that's right… 40 of these iSimple megaPhones that improve your iPhone or iPod's volume (www.geekbeat.tv/isimple). Here's what you do to win:

-- Do you have me in a circle?  Check step one off the list!
-- Publicly share THIS post in your G+ stream, and you're done with step 2!

That's it! You can get all the details at www.geekbeat.tv/contest. You do have to have an address in the United States. We'll pick a winner in a week… it's going to take us a while to count to 40. 1….2…3…uh, what's next??

Oh… and if you don't win, you can always pick one up here: http://bit.ly/isimple-megaphone
1
Add a comment...

Bob Webber

Shared publicly  - 
 
Richard Kadrey originally shared:
 
Romney and Perry's real debate exchange.
Romney: "I'm so much smarter than you."
Perry: "I could kill you with a corn dog."
1
Add a comment...

Bob Webber

Shared publicly  - 
 
Rob Pike originally shared:
 
I got this note from John Ritchie, Dennis's brother:

Dear Rob--

As Dennis's siblings, Lynn, John, and Bill Ritchie--on behalf of the entire Ritchie family--we wanted to convey to all of you how deeply moved, astonished, and appreciative we are of the loving tributes to Dennis that we have been reading. We can confirm what we keep hearing again and again: Dennis was an unfailingly kind, sweet, unassuming, and generous brother--and of course a complete geek. He had a hilariously dry sense of humor, and a keen appreciation for life's absurdities--though his world view was entirely devoid of cynicism or mean-spiritedness.

We are terribly sad to have lost him, but touched beyond words to realize what a mark he made on the world, and how well his gentle personality--beyond his accomplishments--seems to be understood.

Thank you.
1
Add a comment...

Bob Webber

Shared publicly  - 
 
Tim Bray originally shared:
 
It is impossible — absolutely impossible — to overstate the debt my profession owes to Dennis Ritchie. #dmr
2
Add a comment...
In his circles
206 people
Have him in circles
160 people
Karen Schaffer's profile photo
Cathy Doyle's profile photo
Nic Farey's profile photo
Michael Steeves's profile photo
Jane Carnall's profile photo
Gary Mattingly's profile photo

Bob Webber changed his profile photo.

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is an inadequate substitute for coffee. (via icanhascheezburger.com)
1
Add a comment...

Bob Webber

Shared publicly  - 
 
Very interesting and clearly written post introducing some thoughts on the problems with Certification Authorities (CAs) as an anchor for trust in identities and privacy on the Internet. Moxie Marlinspike promotes the notion of "trust agility" as a requisite for practical, useful Internet security in the future.

I had a moment of sardonic amusement due to $EMPLOYER's choice of a CA for cost and ease of use only: the same one belittled in Moxie's comment about trusting domain registrars for DSNSEC:


It turns out that in the case of DNSSEC, there are three classes of people that we have to simultaneously trust:

The registrars. CAs are sketchy, but this is a whole new world of sketchiness. Think, sketchasaurus. Registrars were never built or selected with security in mind, and most of them don't have a very good track record in this area. Shouldn't it be laughable that the current first step in deploying DNSSEC is to create an account with GoDaddy? I mean really, do you trust this guy? Forever?
Liz Henry originally shared:
1
Melinda Shore's profile photo
 
I'm really not sure about that. Clearly there's a trust management problem but 1) I really don't think the CA system is going away anytime soon, at least not in business and academic environments, and 2) "empowering users" tends to result in worse decisions, not better. It's not that people are stupid (well, a lot are, but in the average case they're average) but that "trust" is complicated and subtle and that it's hard for the average person to wrap their head around distinctions between authenticity and trust and permission.

I had a huge "Oh!" moment when Chris was paying her Thames water bill and was shuttled over to some payment website. The obvious question was who these guys were and whether or not they were actually authorized to collect money on behalf of Thames Water, so she posted about this on Facebook and one of her friends, a very senior systems administrator who might reasonably be expected to have thought about this stuff, commented "I don't see a problem - they have an EV certificate."

Anyway, there's very clearly a problem but I don't think it can be solved entirely by technology. There needs to be a better way to delegate and express relationships but as long as humans are the ones making the decisions it's going to be a mess. If the "experts" at Mozilla are dropping every crappy CA cert into their cache, how likely is it that some random user is going to be more discriminating? And while revocation is a HUGE problem with the current mess I'm not sure that expecting users to revoke stuff locally when an incident occurs is a particularly reliable model.

Also, dane is trying to address a problem that Moxie didn't really discuss, which is how to establish that a given CA really is authorized to issue a certificate for a given domain or entity. "Trust agility" doesn't fix that problem.

But anyway, I think the core problem with Moxie's piece is that his business model is wrong.
Add a comment...

Bob Webber

Shared publicly  - 
 
Feeling moderately pleased with myself at work: went fairly far outside my comfort zone by bringing the results of web research I did over the weekend to the attention of our database consultants. Wasn't sure if I was wasting my time on it, didn't want to add wasting theirs (at hourly consulting rates) to the total, went ahead anyway.

Result today was a message from them, as follows:

"Hi Bob,
Thanks for sharing your findings with us. The MySQL flushing problem that all these blog posts point to is definitely the thing that caused the slowdown on [our server]. There are several situations when this can happen and I tend to think that in this case increased buffer pool size allowed more database page changes in memory than InnoDB log file size would accommodate. ...

"The InnoDB log buffer flushing pattern change you noticed on [another server of ours] is really interesting, while I don't think it is directly related to the original problem on [the first server] I will dig into this more and provide you with updates shortly."

It's a good feeling to get positive feedback from an expert after two and a half years on the beach, feeling I must not have the skills I thought I did.
6
Add a comment...

Bob Webber

Shared publicly  - 
 
Who are the 99% and what do they want? An analysis based on their postings on the We are the 99% Tumblr wearethe99percent.tumblr.com
2
3
Add a comment...
People
In his circles
206 people
Have him in circles
160 people
Karen Schaffer's profile photo
Cathy Doyle's profile photo
Nic Farey's profile photo
Michael Steeves's profile photo
Jane Carnall's profile photo
Gary Mattingly's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Toronto, Ontario - Somerville, Massachusetts - Arlington, Massachusetts - Everett, Massachusetts - Malden, Massachusetts - West Medford, Massachusetts
Education
  • University of Toronto
    Metallurgy and Materials Science
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
webbob
Bob Webber's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Mac OS X 10.7 Lion: the Ars Technica review
arstechnica.com

Mac OS X 10.7 Lion is no shrinking violet. Unlike its predecessor, Snow Leopard, which concentrated on internal changes, Lion aims to remake

Kevin Mitnick Shows How To Access Voicemail Without a Password
laughingsquid.com

Laughing Squid. an online resource for art, culture and technology. Home; About. Bloggers; Press & Media. FAQ; Link Blog; Photos; Squid;

Desert beetles shelter broods from attacking parasitic wasps under stack...
www.sciencedaily.com

Seed beetles often will stack their eggs, using them as shields to protect the bottom egg from attacks by parasitic wasps, reveals new resea

Programming Language Checklist
colinm.org

Programming Language Checklist by Colin McMillen, Jason Reed, and Elly Jones. You appear to be advocating a new: [ ] functional [ ] imperati

An Inside Look at The Fake Barf Industry
laughingsquid.com

Laughing Squid. an online resource for art, culture and technology. Home; About. Bloggers; Press & Media. FAQ; Link Blog; Photos; Squid;