Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Jim Boyce
744 followers -
Drinking, eating, working in Beijing. Also run nonprofit nightlife blog beijingboyce.com (whiskey, beer, cocktails, and more) and wine blog grapewallofchina.com.
Drinking, eating, working in Beijing. Also run nonprofit nightlife blog beijingboyce.com (whiskey, beer, cocktails, and more) and wine blog grapewallofchina.com.

744 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Last call for Ningxia Winemakers Challenge: 60 Winemakers, $140,000 in prizes

This is the last week to apply for Ningxia Winemakers Challenge, a project that will fund flights, accommodations and meals for up to 60 foreign winemakers to visit the region on September 20 to join harvest, make wine and visit local wineries and tourist sites. The wines made will be judged in a contest in 2017 with a prize pool of up to 元840,000 (EUR120,000 / USD135,000).

Ningxia will also fund return visits to the region over the next two years and plans to give each participant several thousand bottles of the wine he or she makes. This is the second winemakers project organized by Ningxia, widely seen as China's most promising wine region. The first, launched in 2012, involved seven winemakers and some USD30,000 in prizes.

For full details, plus the application form, check this link.

http://ningxiawineguide.com/ningxia-winemakers-challenge-faq/

The deadline to apply is July 17 at 5 PM and the successful applicants will be announced about one week to ten days later. Just over 90 people have applied so far, so the odds are good at this point!
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2015-07-13
5 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Will you be in London on Tuesday and fancy learning a thing or two about baijiu? The Wine & Spirit Education Trust, the world’s largest alcohol training institution, will hold its first baijiu master class on Tuesday, July 14, at its headquarters.

While baijiu is the world’s most-consumed spirit, and tops the likes of vodka, whisky and rum in terms of global consumption, it is little known beyond China. That includes London, which is home to a sophisticated alcohol scene not to mention a high proportion of the world’s wine and spirits publications.

This is a chance to get insights into this unique Chinese spirit. The class will be led Paul Mathew, co-proprietor of London bars The Hide, The Arbitrager and Demon, Wise & Partners, who spent more than four years in China where he consulted with brands and venues on baijiu-inspired cocktails.

The lineup will include examples from three key baijiu groups–light aroma, strong aroma and sauce aroma.

Again, this is the first such class of its kind, is open to the public, and is being led someone who is adamant he is not a “master” but who has good first-hand experience with this spirit. At 10 pounds, it’s a deal.

To reserve a space, use the sign-up form at this link.

http://www.wsetglobal.com/london_school_courses/30.asp?qualificationid=17&courseid=204
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Trade secret: Don’t blame consumers for low white wine sales in China

The next Wine Business International magazine will include an article I wrote about white wine in China. The main message: the ratio of red wine to white wine sold in this country — typically cited as four-to-one or higher — does not match consumer tastes.

The article looks at examples of consumers giving higher scores to white wines than red wines, at how taste increasingly influences wine purchases, and at over-simplified market views, like the idea red wine is more popular because red is associated with luck while white is associated with death, an odd stance if you consider the top alcohol in the country–baijiu–translates to “white spirit“.

Among the most intriguing interviewees is Helene Ponty, who moved to China in 2012 to import and sell wines made by her family in Bordeaux. Ponty discusses the stark contrast in responses to her white wines by consumers and distributors (highlights are mine):

"If I do an event for consumers, they usually love the white wine, particularly women. I feel like many women are intimidated by red wine or afraid they will get drunk if they have red wine, but they feel better about white wine. They also appreciate the taste more. For our wine in particular, they like the freshness and the slight sweet note. They find the whites less overwhelming and less strong than the reds."

"However, if we do an event for distributors, the attitude is very different. They will say they don’t need white wine, or that their customers don’t drink white wine."

"So it led me to think that the problem lies with the distributors, who have an ingrained mindset that people do not want white wine. I think part of the problem is that distributors do not understand white wine as well as they do red wine, because they do not have experience with it. They do not feel comfortable recommending it, so they keep that attitude that consumers do not buy white wine, they keep the attitude that they do not want to supply white wine."

Distributors who don’t sell white wine because they don’t understand it: talk about a trade secret! After those general remarks, Ponty gives a specific example — from a wine dinner in Changsha — of peer pressure in the trade working against white wine:

"…at the beginning of the dinner, when not everyone had arrived, I had one attendee, a man, come to me and ask me about our white wine. He wanted to know how white wine was made, how it was different from red wine, how to drink it. We tasted my white wine together and he enjoyed it very much."

"Later on during the dinner, I started by serving the white wine. One man stood up and said he would not have white wine as it was a drink for women. And he would not drink a woman’s drink! Of course all of the men at the table had to show how manly they were and all refused to drink the white wine, even though they said nothing when we started pouring in the first place."

Ponty’s conclusion?

"In general, I think there are a lot of misconceptions and lack of education about white wine. Most of the education you see in China is about red. So people do not know white wine and think of it as a girly drink, a light drink, not as legitimate as red wine."

This is significant given how well whites wines do in taste tests. That’s not to say that under perfect conditions white wine would be as popular or more popular than red wine, which still has far greater status and perceived health benefits.

But it is to say that a default focus on red wine--whether it means distributors who refuse to stock white wine, vineyards that are are primarily planted with red grape varieties, or trade people who only understand and push red wine--does skew the numbers.

How much? Get the full story in the next Wine Business International! You can also find lots more info at my blog Grape Wall of China.

http://www.grapewallofchina.com/2015/04/06/trade-secret-dont-blame-consumers-for-low-white-wine-sales-in-china/
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Deep-fried baijiu. I asked Beijing chef / catering guy Dustin Merrett if it would work and, based on his initial tests, the answers is a resounding yes, with "sauce aroma" baijiu working best thus far... 

http://www.worldbaijiuday.com/2015/03/27/food-deep-fried-baijiu-with-dustin-merrett/
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I recently interviewed a pair of fascinating Americans involved in the baijiu scene.

Jim Rice, who has lived in China ~30 years, worked for Kimberly-Clark, Danone and Tyson, and who is now head of Sichuan Swellfun, which owns the baijiu brand Shuijingfang, in which Diageo has the key share.

Rice told me how he's positioning the brand in China given the current austerity program and also what it will take to break through overseas. See here:

http://www.worldbaijiuday.com/2015/03/23/interview-jim-rice-on-taking-shuijingfang-upmarket-in-china-localizing-baijiu-abroad/

Matt Trusch, who spent the greater part of 15 years living in China and working in banking, real estate and gems, before heading back to the U.S. in 2007 and creating baijiu brand ByeJoe.

He told me about the four 'p's -- proof, pungency, packaging and price -- he considered before launching his brand. He also discussed how he rolled out the product in the U.S. and how he imports base baiiju from the China to the U.S. and refines it there due to consumers having food safety concerns.

See part 1 of the interview here:

http://www.worldbaijiuday.com/2015/03/18/interview-matt-trusch-of-byejoe-on-the-four-ps-of-a-chinese-spirit-brand-in-the-u-s-market/

And part 2 here:

http://www.worldbaijiuday.com/2015/03/25/interview-matt-trusch-on-joining-the-un-bar-millennials-and-food-safety/

Cheers, Boyce
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I launched a project called World Baijiu Day almost a week ago. Bars in New York, Los Angeles and Beijing are joining this event and I will post updates as venues in other cities climb on board.

The basic idea: baijiu is the world's most popular spirit, but is produced and consumed almost entirely in China. It is also widely reviled, in large part because many come to know it from forced drinking sessions with low-quality spirits. (I equate it to friends during my university days who had a bad tequila experience and cannot tolerate the smell of this spirit any more and thus have tried nothing beyond Jose Cuervo.)

World Baijiu Day is aimed at those beyond China who are aficionados or curious about baijiu. There will be a strong focus on cocktails made with baijiu and on comparing and contrasting different styles of this spirit in order to see how distinct they are. I'm also filling out our web site -- worldbaijiuday.com -- with info on where to buy baijiu outside of China, a list of online and print resources, an FAQ page, and interviews with consumers, reviewers and distributors.

Oh, the date is Saturday, August 8. I've already had a dozen people tell me it should be on August 9, given the date in Chinese -- ba jiu -- sounds a lot like baijiu, but I'm not sure how well this would go over on a Sunday!

In any case, if you think this project is a good idea, much appreciated if you spread the word. The site is worldbaijiuday.com and I'll also update at www.facebook.com/worldbaijiuday and twitter.com/worldbaijiuday.

Cheers, Boyce
World Baijiu Day
World Baijiu Day
worldbaijiuday.com
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Grace Vineyard is the Yao Ming of China Wine. Plus, my "5A formula" for picking the top local bottles. Stories from last week's e-newsletter here: http://goo.gl/DQU7a6.

If you'd like to receive future issues -- and, let's be honest, who doesn't enjoy a nice fancy wine newsletter - send me your email address. I tend to publish the newsletter once per month unless I get really busy, really lazy or really hungover from too many Grand Cru -- or is it Great Wall? -- tastings.

Cheers, Boyce
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Happy Canada Day! Here's a collage of last Saturday's party at 4corners Beijing, complete with poutine, Nanaimo bars, Caesars, Moosehead and lots more, including about six hours of Canuck tunes.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Sonoma County makes some of the world's best wines but -- unlike its neighbor Napa --- has only recently started focusing on China. Sonoma County Vintners came through Beijing last week and held the group's first tasting in this country before heading to Shanghai, Guangzhou and now Hong Kong. Some superb Chardonnays in the sit-down tasting, headed by  Debra Meiburg, with translated from Dorian Tang. More details at the link...
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
VinExpo starts today in Hong Kong. If you're interested in the China scene, here are five events you might want to catch.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded