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Hal Cooper
Attended University of Idaho
Lives in Whitefish, MT
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Hal Cooper

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My nephew Grayson is on CNN being interviews by Anderson Cooper about the Everest avalanche.  Check it out. 

http://ac360.blogs.cnn.com/2014/04/18/veteran-climber-talks-about-mount-everests-deadliest-accident-ever/?hpt=ac_mid
 
Since before Edmond Hillary stood atop Mount Ever­est in 1953 the Sherpa peo­ple of Nepal have assisted climbers hop­ing to sum­mit the tallest peak in the world. In an econ­omy with lim­ited prospects for finan­cial gain many Sherpa have few choices but to face the rig­ors of com­mer­cial climb­ing expe­di­tions in order to feed their fam­i­lies. And when these men die while per­form­ing extremely haz­ardous tasks, their sur­viv­ing fam­ily mem­bers are not only left with­out a pri­mary wage earner but they sel­dom receive ade­quate insur­ance ben­e­fits to help com­pen­sate for their loss.
Are commercial climbing operators and their clients asking the Sherpa to pay too high a price for their adventure experience?
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Hal Cooper

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The link next to the picture will load the actual 2 billion pixel image.  It takes a while to load.

About:
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/12/20/mount-everest-panorama-interactive_n_2336618.html
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Hal Cooper

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11:52 PM ET





Veteran climber talks about Mount Everest's deadliest accident ever


At least 12 people are dead and four others are missing in an avalanche 20,000 feet up Mount Everest. All of those reported killed are Sherpas, the guides who help countless climbers up and down the world's highest peak. They were preparing for the spring climbing season by setting ropes and getting camps ready for their busiest time of the year. Grayson Schaffer is a veteran climber and the Senior Editor of Outside Magazine. He told Anderson that western climbers are outsourcing their risk to the Sherpas.

At least 12 people are dead and four others are missing in an avalanche 20,000 feet up Mount Everest. All of those reported killed are Sherpas, the guides who help countless climbers up and down the world's highest peak.
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Hal Cooper

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Today an avalanche on Mt. Everest killed 12 Nepalese Sherpas. According to The Guardian, the accident occurred while the Sherpas were fixing ropes for other climbers in an extremely dangerous ice fall area. Tourism ministry spokesman Mohan Krishna Sapkota says they were preparing the route for the climbing season that starts later this month. 
Grayson Schaffer, senior editor for Outside Magazine, wrote an article last year called Disposable Man about the extreme risk Sherpas face and what little financial protection they have—for themselves and for their families—if they are injured, maimed or killed on the job. 
Schaffer spoke to Fresh Air last summer about the dangerous work Sherpas do on Everest:
"The thing to understand about the Sherpa workforce is that there’s no other tourism industry in the world that so frequently kills and maims its workers for the benefit of paying clients. And it’s something that people haven’t yet connected the dots on. That a 1 percent mortality rate for someone choosing to climb a mountain is acceptable, but a 1 percent mortality [rate] for the people that they rely on to get their stuff up the mountain as a workplace safety statistic is outrageous. …
If you’re a Western climber, you’re climbing the mountain once and you’re done. If you’re a Sherpa, you’re doing lap after lap after lap through this roulette wheel of hazards that we know has a death rate, long term, of 1.2 percent, and that number makes climbing Everest as a Sherpa more dangerous than working on a crab boat in Alaska. It makes it more dangerous than being an infantryman in the first four years of the Iraq War. The thing that hides that number is that the season is relatively short … and [has] a relatively small workforce.”
Photograph by Cory Richards, National Geographic 


http://nprfreshair.tumblr.com/post/83101225976/today-an-avalanche-on-mt-everest-killed-12
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Hal Cooper

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Spirits of dead climbers haunt Mount Everest and funeral rites need to be performed for their deliverance, the Sherpa who whizzed to the summit in record time says.
Pemba Dorji Sherpa, 26, who scaled the 8,848-metre high peak in 8 hours 10 minutes on May 21, told AFP he saw “black shadows” near the summit on his way up.
“When I was on my way to setting the record, I stopped briefly at three points between 8,000 and 8,748 metres to drink tea,” Pemba said.
“When I stopped at a mound of rocks I saw some spirits in the form of black shadows coming towards me, stretching their hands and begging for something to eat,” he said.
“I think those were the spirits of the many mountaineers killed during and after the ascent of Mount Everest.
“The bodies of many of those who died are still on the mountain and one climber who died from an accidental fall is still hanging from a rope,” Pemba said.
More than 200 people have died attempting to reach the highest place on Earth..........
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Hal Cooper

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Tanya Ballinger
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Hal Cooper

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Since before Edmond Hillary stood atop Mount Ever­est in 1953 the Sherpa peo­ple of Nepal have assisted climbers hop­ing to sum­mit the tallest peak in the world. In an econ­omy with lim­ited prospects for finan­cial gain many Sherpa have few choices but to face the rig­ors of com­mer­cial climb­ing expe­di­tions in order to feed their fam­i­lies. And when these men die while per­form­ing extremely haz­ardous tasks, their sur­viv­ing fam­ily mem­bers are not only left with­out a pri­mary wage earner but they sel­dom receive ade­quate insur­ance ben­e­fits to help com­pen­sate for their loss.
Are commercial climbing operators and their clients asking the Sherpa to pay too high a price for their adventure experience?
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BASED ON THE AUGUST 2013 STORY "DISPOSABLE MAN": outsideonline.com/sherpas
For more than a century, Western climbers have hired Nepal's Sherpas to do the most dangerous work on Mount Everest. It's a lucrative way of life in a poor region, but no service industry in the world so frequently kills and maims its workers for the benefit of paying clients. As Grayson Schaffer reports, the dead are often forgotten, and their families left with nothing but ghosts.

http://vimeo.com/69673509
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I Reface Saxophone mouthpieces.  If you want good high notes and good low notes, check out what I can do for you.  Extended range is much easier with a thin tip rail.
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