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Justin Mattson
Works at Google
Attended Boston University
Lives in San Francisco
4,108 followers|1,185,072 views
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Justin Mattson

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This came to me via a colleague.


"1: Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.

2: Do not think it worthwhile to produce belief by concealing evidence, for the evidence is sure to come to light.

3: Never try to discourage thinking, for you are sure to succeed.

4: When you meet with opposition, even if it should be from your husband or your children, endeavor to overcome it by argument and not by authority, for a victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory.

5: Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found.

6: Do not use power to suppress opinions you think pernicious, for if you do the opinions will suppress you.

7: Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.

8: Find more pleasure in intelligent dissent than in passive agreement, for, if you value intelligence as you should, the former implies a deeper agreement than the latter.

9: Be scrupulously truthful, even when truth is inconvenient, for it is more inconvenient when you try to conceal it.

10. Do not feel envious of the happiness of those who live in a fool’s paradise, for only a fool will think that it is happiness."
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Justin Mattson

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The auto-awesome twinkling Christmas lights filter is a good idea, unfortunately it has a lot of false positives in my pictures. Little reflections off anything glass or metal also twinkle. Suddenly my Christmas tree seems to have an electron cloud of lights around it.
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I recently learned the hard way that if making a ring ShapeDrawable you must set the android:useLevel attribute to "false" (unless using in a LevelListDrawable) or it won't show up. This is noted in the documentation, but also based on the documentation I would expect that it defaulted to false, it apparently defaults to "true".
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Justin Mattson

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If I hear or read "internet of things" one more time, I think I'm going to go mad. When I hear this much about something I always wonder if its doomed.
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Justin Mattson

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Damn you +Tim Bray for such a tantalizing review, I'm gonna have to read it now.
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Justin Mattson

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How a news outlet reports about the stolen Target PIN data tells me a lot about how "fair and balanced" they are.

Target's encrypted PIN data was stolen, not the decoded PINs. This is the difference between bank robbers stealing an all-but impenetrable safe that was inside the vault and stealing dollar bills from the vault. Assuming the encryption is done correctly, it is almost impossible that a even single PIN can be decoded in our lifetimes. The encryption code responsible for these PINs is probably some of the most audited in the world and primary purpose is to defend against exactly this kind of attack. So, how do news outlets report this?

CNN gives a vague headline "Target Confirms PIN data was stolen in breach" and they let you take the implicit step "thieves know my PIN is 12345". This outlet is sensationalizing. In the body of the story they continue "However, the retailer believes the PINs remain 'safe and secure'." Note that their choice of word is "believes", well of course Target believes the data is secure, the best analysis of all available data points to an exceedingly high probability that the PINs are still encoded. Target "believes" their statement as much as I believe I'm currently on Earth, it may be a belief, but it's one based on fact.

Reuters is better, "Target says PINs stolen, but confident data secure". "confident" is a direct quote from Target, although somehow the phrasing still suggests to me Reuters wants you to question Target's assessment.

Businessweek, in my opinion, says it best, "Target Says Encrypted PIN Information Stolen in Card Breach." Businessweek is giving an objective assessment of the situation and also an assessment that is complete at the level of detail of a headline.

My opinion is that CNN should be ashamed, Reuters should feel a little guilty, and Businessweek should be applauded.

http://money.cnn.com/2013/12/27/technology/target-pin/
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/12/27/target-databreach-idUSL2N0K60RS20131227
http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-12-27/target-says-debit-card-pins-are-safe-after-data-security-breach
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Justin Mattson

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I don't understand, I ordered something from Amazon over 24 hours ago and it hasn't shipped. I fear the end is nigh.
(And yes, I realize how spoiled and over privileged this statement make me seem.)
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Justin Mattson

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I wish I had a use for one.
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Yeah they look awesome, but I'm happy with my iMac which cost half the price :)
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Justin Mattson

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I'm not sure I want to read a site catering to folks who don't know the answer to this question. This is 2013 for goodness sake, this headline is like "Red crayons, when to use them." That makes me a bit of a techno snob I think, but so be it.
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Justin Mattson

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Last night there was a 3.0 tremor on the north-east side of Berkeley. I was surprised how noticeable it was in our apartment in the middle of San Francisco. Anyone else similarly surprised?
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I was in central Berkeley at the time and it was quite noticeable but not strong; moved the floor a bit for two seconds and that was it.  Sometimes these things can feel more dramatic further away from the epicenter.
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Have him in circles
4,108 people
Deric Bert's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Developer Advocate
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2011 - present
  • Google
    Developer Advocate, 2006 - 2011
  • Soligence
    Senior Software Engineer, 2005 - 2006
  • The Michel-Shaked Group
    Network Admin & Programmer, 2001 - 2005
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
San Francisco
Previously
Waterloo, Iowa - Boston, Massachusetts
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Tagline
I am a software engineer at Google working on Android@Home. I totally geek out about economics, physics, meteorology, and Star Trek: The Next Generation
Introduction
I am a Software Engineer working on the Android@Home team at Google. I spend my time building software that will allow for home automation and control running on top of Android. I want you to be able to control everything around you that uses electricity from your Android device. Even more I want to allow developers to write software that allows you to automate and control your machinery.

Before working on @Home I spent over three years as a Developer Advocate on Android, working with 3rd party developers to build amazing apps on Android.

I am a social liberal and fiscal conservative, which means I think people should be able to do what they want as long as it doesn't harm others and I don't have to pay for it. Am I heartless? No, I just don't believe in legislated generosity and compassion. I do make exceptions for things I consider so trivially costly or of such great utility that we should just do them and get on with our lives.
Bragging rights
Naming it "Nexus" was my idea, no matter what you may have read in "In the 'Plex"
Education
  • Boston University
    Computer Science, 1999 - 2003
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Gender
Male