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Benny Bridger
Lives in Boston, MA
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Benny Bridger

commented on a video on YouTube.
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While informative, the video ends really abruptly! You left me in the dark at the end! Consider a "clincher" that closes the webinar if you can. Otherwise, great stuff here. Looking closely at RT now.
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Raven Tools's profile photo
 
Benny, thanks for the tip! Also, here's a more recent video if you want to see what's new since this one: Raven Demo
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I'd like to hear some thoughts on the use of Temperature Sensors/Monitors for Refrigerators/Freezers on Food Trucks. My understanding of local (and federal) food codes are varied, and I see some specifications that seem specific to Massachusetts.

Has anybody used temperature sensors/thermometers on their truck, and how strict is your health department/inspector on these compliance/food safety issues? Trying to get a feel for Chicago here, and don't worry, I'm not here to hate on the hawks ;)
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Benny Bridger

Football - NFL  - 
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Benny Bridger

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Has anyone done research before by using the Wayback Machine? It'll be a title for one of my blog posts in the future, but I can't hold this thought in my 'mind safe' any longer

If you're looking to do research on competitors (or even your own company), there's tons of value in using the Wayback Machine to chart progress and changes to websites. For instance, I was able to discover the roots of one of our competitors by the using the engine, and further, charted their website/messaging/landing page changes over a period of two years. I've even used it on our homepage (and product pages) to see the evolution of  our brand. Whenever my boss begins explaining our product/company history with  "well we used...", I follow up with a Wayback trip through the interwebs, and see such 'old ways' with a fresh perspective in "real" time. 

If you haven't used it already (other than for fun, the web in 2001 WAS indeed quite the place), I suggest you take a look.

Creative Thinking = Insightful Research. Give it a shot!

http://archive.org/web/web.php
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Benny Bridger

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I'm following the LinkedIn trend of "things I carry" here. God I need a personal blog.

I don't carry an arsenal of pocket goodies, briefcase belongings, or personal consumption accessories to work. In fact, I keep my pockets mostly empty (aside from a train pass, my wallet, and a Smartphone), my working possessions live in the office (hence I don't carry a bag), and I always seem to lose any nice pair of sunglasses that I'm given. At this point, I'll just let my retinas burn.

But apart from what I "don't" physically carry to work, I do carry an emotionless and honest passenger. It sounds dark, depressing, and cold, but it can help to understand and expose the barren truth of an idea or concept. When I entered a new job in the past, I was the first to suggest change, the first to question the static choices that had been cemented into the company menu. When my superiors attempted to suppress any one of these thoughts, my interest in an emotionless and honest opinion waned in favor of being the 'positive' and 'supportive' employee. I feared that I was the 'disruptive' and 'misguided' wannabe innovator who didn't have the lifetime experience to make those types of observations. Surely I've had some annoying and irrelevant ideas that I've pushed over the years in my career quest, but I've recently learned the true value of that "blank slate", and why I shouldn't be suppressing it in fear of being loathed by superiors. Perhaps I'm just a wimp, but we'll put that aside.

After my last company, I began to see the true value in disruptive and honest thinking. An emotionless and honest opinion (in smaller doses, mind you) based on the current static conditions (from website messaging to product pricing), was a tremendous advantage that I could bring as a new (and seasoned) employee. Once I arrived at my current position at Temperature@lert, I immediately dissected our history and past innovations, and without stepping on toes, put together a preliminary assessment of where we stood (a bit like a consultant). I brought a fresh pair of eyes to a roundtable of certainty.

Once I had gained additional confidence in my company and our competitive landscape, I began to take the emotional latches off of my thoughts even further. I began to see our products in their true form. I was able to reposition my mind to become a customer, and as many incredible companies (UserTesting.com for example) are doing, made several conscious efforts to simulate a customer's journey. And most of all, I took these ideas to my superiors without fear of suppression and was confident in the honest observations that I mashed together. I had done my research, I had gathered my thoughts, and I had taken a hard, emotionless look at every facet of our business

The blank slate that I'm talking about is essentially an ongoing mental notepad, a third ear in every meeting or call, and a reminder that emotional attachment (particularly to a company or product) can skew the realities of what a customer or prospect might actually experience or see for example. Put another way, it's a pool of skepticism, a collection of ideas that stands contrary to what is ingrained or bypassed by our 'positive and progressive employee' persona. I believe most of us have this within, and I wouldn't discourage it, but this persona grows stronger with an increase in tenure, our ability to step outside of the 'tried and true' box shrinks. Take this idea with a grain of salt; I wouldn't suggest questioning the value or necessity of a successful product, and I wouldn't encourage an overhaul of new thinking for every monthly budget meeting or roundup. All I'm pushing for the bottom line, the truth amidst comfortable attachment and interaction. This invaluable pool is where innovation can happen, where truth can settle, and where emotion is extracted from evaluation. A juror must do the same thing when weighing evidence in a criminal case; emotion must be removed from the equation. I carry the slate with me wherever I go, making additions and observations as I absorb industry knowledge. It's a deep and sensitive pool, but truly worth a thoughtful dip every so often.
1
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Benny Bridger

Basketball - NBA  - 
 
Let's be serious, this entire conversation about Jordan VS James is embalmed in silliness, nonsense, and emotional attachment. Can we be honest with ourselves? My man Cowherd always says "take the emotion out of it" and "what do you eyeballs tell you?"

Here's what I come up with:  James is about 2-3 inches taller, has 30-40 pounds on Jordan in his prime, and is the equivalent of a freight train. You give me the two best of most sports, and I'll take the one who's bigger, faster, and stronger any day of the week. Also, James is the next generation of superstar: the physical tools, the focus, in-game instincts, and the ability to "do it all". The guy can defend any position, and will dunk on any defender. He took a crap team to the finals by himself, and won it last year with enough help. Don't talk to me about '4th quarter struggles'.  If it's 1 on 1, you know who I'm betting on.

Disagree? Yell at me. It's Thursday.
1
Benny Bridger's profile photoKorinne M Jackman's profile photoJason Van Lieu's profile photo
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I agtee, that stretch of 30+ while shooting 60% was amazing. He's by far the best player in the league. 
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Have him in circles
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Muhammad Khalil's profile photo
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Need an expert's take.

I have a problem with my analytics efforts. We have a main site with products, and a web application/monthly subscription model for the service end of those products.

The issue: Returning customers are using our site as a stepping stone to the web application (a different and unique URL that is unrelated to the main site). We have a link on our homepage for these returning users. Is this contributing to our bounce rate, wherein return visitors are bouncing from our homepage to their respective dashboard (that ultimately stems from our services) at a separate URL?

If these are considered bounces, can anyone suggest a strategy for preventing this unfortunate bounce rate boost?
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Jason L D Sky's profile photo
 
Can you remove the link on your homepage for a period of time to test?
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One of the best resources I've ever seen for CRO and a variety of other topics. No BS writing style.
1
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Benny Bridger

Baseball - MLB  - 
 
I've been away from baseball watching for about a year or two, but I have kept tabs on these great young players. I'll admit that I have yet to see enough reps/innings of Mike Trout, but I really think his superstar season overshadowed a different truth.

The truth I'm talking about? That Bryce Harper might turn into one of the greatest hitters to (naturally) play this game. If you haven't seen his swing, the hip rotation and torque that he achieves is almost physically impossible, but he seems to also have the hitter instincts to become one of the best. I like Trout and I look forward to seeing him shine again this season, but I do think we've forgotten about Harper a little bit. And oh by the way, 3 home runs (and a .360 average) in his first 6 games is nothing short of impressive as well. 

If you disagree and have more 'watching' insight, fill me in on a better comparison. As far as I've seen of Harper, he's the next big time hitter of this generation (Williams, Griffey Jr, Ramirez), whereas Trout (as the Prince of the 2012 season) is being called 'Mickey Mantle' already (which I'll have to see for myself, but I'm inclined to believe it)
1
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For you entrepreneurs and SMB's (following the LinkedIn trend of 'Things I Carry')

I don't carry an arsenal of pocket goodies, briefcase belongings, or personal consumption accessories to work. In fact, I keep my pockets mostly empty (aside from a train pass, my wallet, and a Smartphone), my working possessions live in the office (hence I don't carry a bag), and I always seem to lose any nice pair of sunglasses that I'm given. At this point, I'll just let my retinas burn.

But apart from what I "don't" physically carry to work, I do carry an emotionless and honest passenger. It sounds dark, depressing, and cold, but it can help to understand and expose the barren truth of an idea or concept. When I entered a new job in the past, I was the first to suggest change, the first to question the static choices that had been cemented into the company menu. When my superiors attempted to suppress any one of these thoughts, my interest in an emotionless and honest opinion waned in favor of being the 'positive' and 'supportive' employee. I feared that I was the 'disruptive' and 'misguided' wannabe innovator who didn't have the lifetime experience to make those types of observations. Surely I've had some annoying and irrelevant ideas that I've pushed over the years in my career quest, but I've recently learned the true value of that "blank slate", and why I shouldn't be suppressing it in fear of being loathed by superiors. Perhaps I'm just a wimp, but we'll put that aside.

After my last company, I began to see the true value in disruptive and honest thinking. An emotionless and honest opinion (in smaller doses, mind you) based on the current static conditions (from website messaging to product pricing), was a tremendous advantage that I could bring as a new (and seasoned) employee. Once I arrived at my current position at Temperature@lert, I immediately dissected our history and past innovations, and without stepping on toes, put together a preliminary assessment of where we stood (a bit like a consultant). I brought a fresh pair of eyes to a roundtable of certainty.

Once I had gained additional confidence in my company and our competitive landscape, I began to take the emotional latches off of my thoughts even further. I began to see our products in their true form. I was able to reposition my mind to become a customer, and as many incredible companies (UserTesting.com for example) are doing, made several conscious efforts to simulate a customer's journey. And most of all, I took these ideas to my superiors without fear of suppression and was confident in the honest observations that I mashed together. I had done my research, I had gathered my thoughts, and I had taken a hard, emotionless look at every facet of our business

The blank slate that I'm talking about is essentially an ongoing mental notepad, a third ear in every meeting or call, and a reminder that emotional attachment (particularly to a company or product) can skew the realities of what a customer or prospect might actually experience or see for example. Put another way, it's a pool of skepticism, a collection of ideas that stands contrary to what is ingrained or bypassed by our 'positive and progressive employee' persona. I believe most of us have this within, and I wouldn't discourage it, but this persona grows stronger with an increase in tenure, our ability to step outside of the 'tried and true' box shrinks. Take this idea with a grain of salt; I wouldn't suggest questioning the value or necessity of a successful product, and I wouldn't encourage an overhaul of new thinking for every monthly budget meeting or roundup. All I'm pushing for the bottom line, the truth amidst comfortable attachment and interaction. This invaluable pool is where innovation can happen, where truth can settle, and where emotion is extracted from evaluation. A juror must do the same thing when weighing evidence in a criminal case; emotion must be removed from the equation. I carry the slate with me wherever I go, making additions and observations as I absorb industry knowledge. It's a deep and sensitive pool, but truly worth a thoughtful dip every so often.
1
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Benny Bridger

Discussion  - 
1
Shane Mcc's profile photo
 
Helpful article +Benny Bridger, thanks!
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Benny Bridger

Discussion  - 
 
Hello All,

Looking for a guest blogger to talk about Temperature Monitoring, Temperature Control, and other "automation" trends that are popping up these days. I have some specifics ideas for an angle, but I would like someone (if possible) who has expertise in IT, BioPharma, or Commercial Refrigeration. A System Administrator would really be ideal (one who understands the issue of temperature control in a DC, for instance).

Thanks everyone, and I'm happy to be a part of this group (I'm also willing to write guest blog posts on a variety of subjects, depending on the need).
1
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