My Venture into Cutting the Cord

Goodbye  TWC Cable TV, I've had enough of your high prices and low quality. 

I'm writing this while currently watching the Colts/Steelers via the 'over-the-air' (ova) broadcast on NBC; Channel 17-1 here near Raleigh. 

It required a HDTV antenna, my preference is the Mohu Leaf Indoor HDTV Antenna - http://t.co/ZavKtSM8 

It also meant attaching the antenna to a Zinwell ZAT-970A Digital to Analog TV Converter Box - http://amzn.to/NVxafi

Still, as someone who owns a RoKu, I  agree with the sentiment expressed article on the Cord Cutter Guide entitled "Why NFL Sunday Ticket should be on Roku and not just on PS3" - http://ht.ly/d51Ek 

However, I'll do without said package this year as I do't want to deal with the DirectTV 2 year contract. For those truly addicted to sports, there's plenty of articles on the Internet that provide help, including these three:
* How to Watch Sports Without Cable - http://ht.ly/d5295
* How-to Watch Live Sports Online Without Cable - http://ht.ly/d52qP
* How Can I Watch (Almost) Any Live Sports Game Online? - http://ht.ly/d52nd

That said, I can get everything else I ever watched on cable -- with the exception of ESPN  -- via NetFlix and HuluPlus Amazon Prime by means of my Roku 2 XS 1080p Streaming Player - http://amzn.to/QfZcyv

Moreover, by loading the Plex Media Server (http://plexapp.com) on my wife's computer, I'm able to get some additional content not available via cable. For example, I can reach-out to the server via my Roku to play YouTube videos and various news networks not in the Roku lineup.

If that's not enough, there are a number of third-party channels that allow streaming of videos from a computer to your Roku box. Roksbox (http://roksbox.com/) and Chaneru (http://www.chaneru.com/) are among the most popular ones.

More on how to "Stream on! How to stream from your PC to Roku player" can be found here:  http://ht.ly/d53ms

There's also some fun one can have with their smartphone and Roku, which are mentioned in this post on the Official Roku Blog entitled "Roku 101: everything you need to know about your Roku player" - http://ht.ly/d52Fi

Of course, to get things running on my Roku, purchased a LinkSys WRT54g off of Craigslist and converted it into repeater-bridge using the free dd-wrt router software - http://ht.ly/d52U1

I actually brought the router into the picture when I wanted to reduce my Time Warner bill last year by ditching the premium package, but retain the ability to record. I did this by purchasing a used ReplayTV 5040 with the lifetime subscription that I hacked and updated via instructions here - http://ht.ly/d52Z1 

I can still record with the device, though I don't have a channel guide anymore ... which inspires me to further investigate http://Mythbuntu.org and http://SchedulesDirect.org

One advantage to flashing a used router into a repeater bridge is that the DVR, Roku and Wii are now all hard-wired into the dd-wrt device, which has cured numerous WIFI conflicts and latency issues as the modified Linksys device does a far better job of negotiating all that traffic with the reburbed dual-band Netgear WNDR3300 router that services the rest of my house.

In the end, you're not going to get the same experience as cable, but you're also not going to pay $100 a month just to see reality tv, paid programming and yet another running of Mrs. Doubtfire on the movie channels.

Moreover, even with the investments in some of the various devices mentioned above, I'll be at the break-even within 3 months.

Your mileage may vary.
Photo
Shared publiclyView activity