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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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"if it doesn't, you'll probably never see this" - lol
nicely done!
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Peter Brown's profile photo
 
+Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home) Thank you!
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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Nice!
The ingredients to that finish sound more like a finish for turned objects - like pens. The alcohol and wax would give a nice polished finish when applied with a lot of friction as in while turning on a lathe. But there's nothing wrong with using it on this project though.
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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Nicely done! I've been meaning to try this technique myself. I've seen some videos of Japanese craftsmen using a steel iron heated in a forge and they burned the wood by ironing it and then brushed it off with straw to achieve a beautiful effect, but I don't know what species wood they were using. 
Have you tried that method yet, or just the torch?
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)'s profile photoDieter Schneider Photography's profile photo
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I was wondering about that too. Burns pretty well
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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this    is    i m p r e s s i v e
nicely done!
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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Wow, they really tunneled into that board. I never knew they did THAT much damage.
I don't like killing bees either (especially given their population problem right now), but I make an exception for those carpenter bees when they bore into my woodwork. I'll be interested to see how well these traps work.
As for the safety glasses - glad to see you're using them! But they don't work well for me for keeping air-borne dust out of my eyes (with or without a fan assisting the nuisance). The dust will just circle around the lenses with the air movement. Just stand up-wind when you can.
Goggles do a better job of keeping dust away from the eyes, but are too uncomfortable to me, reduce my visual range, and eventually fog up even after using anti-fogging stuff. So I don't use goggles often, but I use safety glasses all the time.
My left eye was saved by safety glasses at the chop saw once. A fairly large piece kicked off the chop saw fence and hit me square in line with my pupil before I even knew it had kicked off the chop saw fence. It hit hard enough that my safety glasses actually shifted sideways.
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+Dogwood Tales Completely agree... I try to avoid killing things that aren't harmful, especially bees as you mentioned... but these bees seem like a different beast than the honey bee. And wow -- glad you weren't harmed. Stories like that make me more excited about hand woodworking lol.Thanks for watching.
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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Nicely done!
I too have had a projectile off the ts in a similar way, however I wasn't as lucky and ended up with a nice welt on the chest that was really sore and lasted a while.
I like the 4-leaf clover look of the project, although a three leg/log  stool wouldn't wobble.
I read an article in Wood magazine (I think) a while back about using the ts to level legs on a chair n such. I tried it and it works very well. Using the ts as probably the most true flat surface most shops would have, put the project on the ts to find the long leg, or in your case the high and low spots. Just raise the blade about a millimeter or less and then slide the long leg over the blade. With the blade so low there's no kick back. In this project in addition to removing the uneven spots to stop the wobble I would probably use this technique to hog out more of the center and let the weight sit on the outside perimeter, but the use of those felt pads achieves the same result.
Again, nice project! I like the camera angle at 1:06
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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what is that piece that he hols up at 0:30?
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Not only have I kept a machete in my tool area for a long time (now has migrated to the shed by the garden), but I have other unusual things around as well. Amongst those are a 5 inch knife that my uncle was issued by the Navy some 60 years ago, an ol' black powder dispenser, and a spike from an abandoned train track. I don't have a skull - yet - but I do have a shopmade (skull-less) skeleton hanging near my table saw. Have to find (read "clear") a different place to keep that thing though.
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+Dogwood Tales Your skeleton sounds cool! It's always fun to have tools that are passed down.
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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Great video! This is the excellence in joinery to which I aspire.

Considering how that a blind dovetail like this was just a matter of the process, whereas today it's almost intimidating, I often wonder if the craftsmen had any idea just how excellent they were.
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Here is a fast and effecitve method for applying a seal coat to a hardwood floor.
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Dogwood Tales (Projects For the Home)

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Hell I make mistakes ad nauseam without the distraction of a camera and that stray nail point may be more due to the grain of the wood deflecting the nail than the angle of the nail gun. In which case it's crappy luck, not a mistake.
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+Michael Coolidge That's true. When somebody shows me something that they made, I don't even notice the flaws. I think, wow, that's cool ...while they are telling me about how they messed it up here, here, and here. Anyhow, I'm glad if you like this kind of secondary content.
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Story
Introduction
A woodworker who saws to the beat of a different kind of bongo.
 
 
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