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British Museum
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A museum of the world, for the world
A museum of the world, for the world

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In 1881 French sculptor Auguste Rodin visited London. On a trip to the British Museum, he saw the Parthenon sculptures and was instantly captivated and inspired by the beauty of these ancient Greek masterpieces. For the first time, our major #RodinExhibition will bring together the artist’s works with the Parthenon sculptures that influenced his radical approach to sculpture. The exhibition will include Rodin’s iconic works ‘The Kiss’ and ‘The Thinker’, and many other sculptures on loan from Musée Rodin.

‘Rodin and the art of ancient Greece’ opens 26 April – book tickets: http://ow.ly/eytB30hI43L

This exhibition is sponsored by Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Auguste Rodin (1840–1917), The Kiss. S.174. Plaster, after 1898. Musée Rodin.
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Happy New Year! January is named after the Roman god Janus. He had two faces so he could see the future and the past.
Find out how all the months got their names in this blog post: http://ow.ly/jOcd30hjUaH
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This New Year’s Eve, here’s a stunning selection of firework displays from around the world! http://ow.ly/i/BsbmE http://ow.ly/i/Bsboo
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Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, was murdered #onthisday in 1170. This alabaster panel shows Becket kneeling before an altar with four knights approaching from behind – two of them are about to attack him with swords. The figure with the cross behind the altar represents Edward Grim, a clerk from Cambridge who witnessed the atrocity. The murder was committed in a side chapel of Canterbury Cathedral, the knights acting on a misunderstood instruction from King Henry II who was in dispute with Becket over the relative privileges of Church and Crown. http://ow.ly/RUQd30hfk72
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Happy Christmas! This jolly looking snowman was made in 1922 by American artist Horace Devitt Welsh ⛄️
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Today is the #WinterSolstice – the shortest day of the year in the northern hemisphere! Here's #Stonehenge by John Constable
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These intricately carved toggles were worn by Japanese men on their kimonos. Known as netsuke (pronounced net-ské), they were popular expressions of style and status during the Edo period (1615–1868). Netsuke were often inspired by the natural world – they’re small enough to fit in the palm of your hand!

You can buy your own hand-carved netsuke in our online shop: http://ow.ly/7dIb30gkjk1
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Our #LivingWithTheGods exhibition opens today! Explore the nature of human belief through everyday objects of faith, ranging from Ice Age sculptures to contemporary art. Journeying through themes of fire, water, light and energy, the exhibition reflects on how people connect to worlds beyond nature, and how believing has been a vital part of human societies. Our curator has picked eight highlight objects – discover them in this blog post.

Book tickets for our five-star exhibition here: http://ow.ly/SEgU30giOVU

Supported by the Genesis Foundation. With grateful thanks to John Studzinski CBE.
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This silver figure of a huntsman is an automaton – it has a clockwork mechanism that would have propelled it forwards on small wheels. It was made in Nuremberg in Germany between 1617 and 1620. The body is hollow and the head is removable so that wine can be poured inside. It was used at drinking parties where it was filled with wine and released across a table – when it stopped, the nearest person had to remove the head and drink all the wine inside! You can see it on display in our Waddesdon Gallery (Room 2a).
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Today is the equinox, when day and night are equal. This clay tablet gives the date of the equinox in an astronomical report to Assyrian King Ashurbanipal who reigned 668–627 BC. The king built a library of thousands of cuneiform tablets in his palace in Nineveh – his attempt to collect all the knowledge in the world!

You can see some of the library on display in Room 55 http://ow.ly/pdpP30fkiyK
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