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British Museum
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A museum of the world, for the world
A museum of the world, for the world

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We’re thrilled to announce a very special new exhibition exploring the work of one of Japan’s greatest artists. ‘Hokusai: beyond the Great Wave’ opens on 25 May 2017. It will lead you on an artistic journey through the last 30 years of Hokusai’s life, when he produced some of his greatest works. Our #Hokusai exhibition will be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see sublime prints and paintings, many on loan from across the world. The exhibition is supported by Mitsubishi Corporation.
Tickets are now on sale: http://ow.ly/IXrw307R8hR
Join us for a #FacebookLive broadcast later today at 17.30 GMT and ask your questions to our Hokusai curator Tim Clark!
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Wave goodbye to your #JanuaryBlues! Tomorrow we’ll be announcing a very special exhibition…
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J R R Tolkein was born #onthisday in 1892. He was Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford University from 1925, and used Anglo-Saxon imagery in his books, including the Lord of the Rings trilogy. This Anglo-Saxon ring is over 1,000 years old, and although the meaning is lost, its runic inscription evokes the languages Tolkein invented.
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Happy New Year everyone! January is named after the Roman god Janus. He had two faces so he could see the future and the past!
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This dazzling mermaid jewel is inlaid with 24 emeralds! Made out of gold, the pendant is also decorated with diamonds and pearls. The belly of the mermaid opens to reveal a small compartment that may have been used to store perfume. You can see this stunning piece of jewellery in the Museum’s Waddesdon gallery (Room 2a).
Read more about its history here: http://ow.ly/XX4H3075SPI
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Happy Christmas! Isn’t this a jolly looking snowman? He was etched by Horace Devitt Welsh in 1922.
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French scholar Jean-François Champollion was born #onthisday in 1790. He used the Rosetta Stone as a key to decipher ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs. He identified that hieroglyphic symbols could be read either as a phonogram (which represented a particular phonetic sound), as a logogram (a symbol meaning a word or phrase), or as an ideogram (where the symbol represented an idea). It was previously thought that Egyptian hieroglyphs were purely ideographic, but Champollion used the Rosetta Stone, with its three scripts, to disprove this. You can see Champollion’s own hieroglyphic writing here: http://ow.ly/TwT9307iifF
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This is the Mold Gold Cape, named after the town in Wales where it was discovered in 1833. The cape was found around the shoulders of a skeleton in a 3,600-year-old burial mound. It’s a stunning example of workmanship, and may have been worn during ceremonies by someone of religious importance.

Find out why this fine example of prehistoric gold working is so significant in this +Google Arts & Culture online exhibition.

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Go down the rabbit hole and explore these Alice in Wonderland etchings in this gallery from +The Guardian. The Dalziel brothers illustrated the Lewis Carroll book, and their work is now being digitised in a project with the +University of Sussex.

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These articulated figurines are made from iron and can be moved into different positions! They were made in the 19th century in Japan. Helmet and armour manufacturers used their skills in curving and riveting metal to produce detailed models of all kinds of creatures. The animals are stunning examples of the craftsmanship – all the scales and feathers are faithfully reproduced in iron plates.
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2016-12-08
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