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Dipika Shah
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You are really great Sir. Thinking to the root cause of every problem and joining it with due respect to leading personalities of the Nation. Its a real tribute to Nation's Freedom Fighter. Because you are a Good Man at Heart with all the care for people of India as well as World, seeking help ftom all possible sources either media or manpower for the Greatest Welfare of the All the people. Infinite SALUTE to THY, respected Sir. Jay Hind. Jay Jagat.
 
Had a very fruitful meeting with Sheryl Sandberg. She pointed out that India is a very important country for Facebook, considering the high number of active Facebook users in India. 

Being an avid user of social media myself, I talked about ways through which a platform such as Facebook can be used for governance and better interaction between the people and governments. I also talked about how Facebook can be used to bring more tourists to India.

We intend to commemorate Mahatma Gandhi’s 150th birth anniversary year with a special focus on cleanliness and I spoke to Ms. Sandberg on how Facebook can assist us in this endeavour.
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Dear all,
We may be facing water shortage issue due to below average rain fall. The trend is not promising this year. We as a responsive citizen we must bring in changes in our daily water usage pattern. This is a collective responsibility. We should not blame local administration. Few tips to use water;
1. For bathing stop using showers, bath tub etc. Instead follow old style of bucket and mug.
2. Please do not wash clothes in washing machine instead washing by hand is advisable.
3. Please do not shave under running tap.
4. Please do not wash car,vehicles daily. You may opt for leaning with damp cloth.
5. For watering of plants do not use fresh water.
6. Please advise maid servant not to clean utensils, dishes etc under running tap.
7. Please have a look at leakages on taps around you and replace washers in toilet and bath fittings.
8. Water harvesting is mantra for survival.

We do toward many msgs around, please please forward this message and create awareness to save water. It is our moral duty to help each other.
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Rani Ki Vav in Patan, Gujarat has been added to the UNESCO #WorldHeritage list! A matter of great pride for us.

Next time you visit Gujarat, you must visit Rani Ki Vav, an excellent symbol of our great art & culture http://www.gujarattourism.com/showpage.aspx?contentid=148&webpartid=415&lang=English
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Let's all initiate a movement this year by taking at least one resolution out of the following:
1. I will always throw garbage in the dustbin. If I don't find a dustbin near by....then I will wait to find out one....
2. I will never ever waste water and I will always close the running taps anywhere I see....
3. I will avoid using gift papers for the gifts I give to anybody....
4. I will never ever waste or throw food....
5. I will try to use steel utensils or give priority to use reusable utensils if I plan to arrange any function....
6. I will always switch off any type of electricity when not needed....anywhere..... (Even its not my home)
7. I will try to reuse plastic items as many times as possible...
8. I will grow at least one tree in my whole lifetime....

So let's make at least one promise to our mother earth this time. If we all join our hands together.... We can ignite a revolution....It's my request that let's start a revolution this year. Because IF NOT WE, THEN WHO? AND IF NOT NOW, THEN WHEN?

Let me know tomorrow, which promise you have done....
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TRIED TO COPY/PASTE THE BEAUTIFUL ARTICLE FOR THOSE WHO COULD NOT GET TODAY'S COPY OF THE HINDU (It is available online also)

A train journey and two names to remember

Of two co-travellers who surprised the writer with their graciousness, 24 years ago

Jun 1, 2014 01:29 AM , By Leena Sarma 

It was the summer of 1990. As Indian Railway (Traffic) Service probationers, my friend and I travelled by train from Lucknow to Delhi. Two MPs were also travelling in the same bogie. That was fine, but the behaviour of some 12 people who were travelling with them without reservation was terrifying. They forced us to vacate our reserved berths and sit on the luggage, and passed obscene and abusive comments. We cowered in fright and squirmed with rage. It was a harrowing night in the company of an unruly battalion; we were on edge, on the thin line between honour and dishonour. All other passengers seemed to have vanished, along with the Travelling Ticket Examiner.

We reached Delhi the next morning without being physically harmed by the goons, though we were emotionally wrecked. My friend was so traumatised she decided to skip the next phase of training in Ahmedabad and stayed back in Delhi. I decided to carry on since another batchmate was joining me. (She is Utpalparna Hazarika, now Executive Director, Railway Board.) We boarded an overnight train to Gujarat’s capital, this time without reservations as there wasn’t enough time to arrange for them. We had been wait-listed.

We met the TTE of the first class bogie, and told him how we had to get to Ahmedabad. The train was heavily booked, but he politely led us to a coupe to sit as he tried to help us. I looked at the two potential co-travellers, two politicians, as could be discerned from their white khadi attire, and panicked. “They’re decent people, regular travellers on this route, nothing to worry,” the TTE assured us. One of them was in his mid-forties with a normal, affectionate face, and the other in his late-thirties with a warm but somewhat impervious expression. They readily made space for us by almost squeezing themselves to one corner.

They introduced themselves: two BJP leaders from Gujarat. The names were told but quickly forgotten as names of co-passengers were inconsequential at that moment. We also introduced ourselves, two Railway service probationers from Assam. The conversation turned to different topics, particularly in the areas of History and the Polity. My friend, a post-graduate in History from Delhi University and very intelligent, took part. I too chipped in. The discussion veered around to the formation of the Hindu Mahasabha and the Muslim League.

The senior one was an enthusiastic participant. The younger one mostly remained quiet, but his body language conveyed his total mental involvement in what was being discussed, though he hardly contributed. Then I mentioned Syama Prasad Mookerjee’s death, why it was still considered a mystery by many. He suddenly asked: “How do you know about Syama Prasad Mookerjee?” I had to tell him that when my father was a post-graduate student in Calcutta University, as its Vice-Chancellor he had arranged a scholarship for the young man from Assam. My father often reminisced about that and regretted his untimely death [in June 1953 at the age of 51].

The younger man then almost looked away and spoke in a hushed tone almost to himself: “It’s good they know so many things ...”

Suddenly the senior man proposed: “Why don’t you join our party in Gujarat?” We both laughed it off, saying we were not from Gujarat. The younger man then forcefully interjected: “So what? We don’t have any problem on that. We welcome talent in our State.” I could see a sudden spark in his calm demeanour.

The food arrived, four vegetarian thalis. We ate in silence. When the pantry-car manager came to take the payment, the younger man paid for all of us. I muttered a feeble ‘thank you’, but he almost dismissed that as something utterly trivial. I observed at that moment that he had a different kind of glow in his eyes, which one could hardly miss. He rarely spoke, mostly listened.

The TTE then came and informed us the train was packed and he couldn’t arrange berths for us. Both men immediately stood up and said: “It’s okay, we’ll manage.” They swiftly spread a cloth on the floor and went to sleep, while we occupied the berths.

What a contrast! The previous night we had felt very insecure travelling with a bunch of politicians, and here we were travelling with two politicians in a coupe, with no fear.

The next morning, when the train neared Ahmedabad, both of them asked us about our lodging arrangements in the city. The senior one told us that in case of any problem, the doors of his house were open for us. There was some kind of genuine concern in the voice or the facial contours of the otherwise apparently inscrutable younger one, and he told us: “I’m like a nomad, I don’t have a proper home to invite you but you can accept his offer of safe shelter in this new place.”

We thanked them for that invitation and assured them that accommodation was not going to be a problem for us.

Before the train came to a stop, I pulled out my diary and asked them for their names again. I didn’t want to forget the names of two large-hearted fellow passengers who almost forced me to revise my opinion about politicians in general. I scribbled down the names quickly as the train was about to stop:Shankersinh Vaghela and Narendra Modi.

I wrote on this episode in an Assamese newspaper in 1995. It was a tribute to two unknown politicians from Gujarat for giving up their comfort ungrudgingly for the sake of two bens from Assam. When I wrote that, I didn’t have the faintest idea that these two people were going to become so prominent, or that I would hear more about them later. When Mr. Vaghela became Chief Minister of Gujarat in 1996, I was glad. When Mr. Modi took office as Chief Minister in 2001, I felt elated. (A few months later, another Assamese daily reproduced my 1995 piece.) And now, he is the Prime Minister of India.

Every time I see him on TV, I remember that warm meal, that gentle courtesy, caring and sense of security that we got that night far from home in a train, and bow my head.

(The author is General Manager of the Centre for Railway Information System, Indian Railways, New Delhi. leenasarma@rediffmail.com)
Copyright 2014, The Hindu
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Had a very fruitful meeting with Sheryl Sandberg. She pointed out that India is a very important country for Facebook, considering the high number of active Facebook users in India. 

Being an avid user of social media myself, I talked about ways through which a platform such as Facebook can be used for governance and better interaction between the people and governments. I also talked about how Facebook can be used to bring more tourists to India.

We intend to commemorate Mahatma Gandhi’s 150th birth anniversary year with a special focus on cleanliness and I spoke to Ms. Sandberg on how Facebook can assist us in this endeavour.
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Our Government completes a month in office! A big thanks to the people for their support & affection that keeps inspiring us to work harder.

Due to people's affection, collective experience of Ministerial colleagues & support from officials my confidence level rose tremendously.

Had fruitful meetings with CMs & detailed presentations with Ministers & Officials. Together we will take India to greater heights.

As NDA Govt. completes a month, sharing some thoughts in my Blog http://nm4.in/1qKDFoY
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Congratulated Rajesh Kumar, son of a PMO staff member, on clearing civil services exam. A proud accomplishment!
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Professor, Department of Education. Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat, INDIA. Editor-in-Chief: www.mdegq.com an International Peer Reviewed Refereed MultiDisciplinary E-Journal with ISSN22503048.