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Michael Morgan
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I'm cycling 300 miles in September to raise money for Cancer Research UK. If you would like to donate, please follow the link below. Many thanks.
Anthony's Cycle 300 Fundraising Page
Anthony's Cycle 300 Fundraising Page
fundraise.cancerresearchuk.org
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"I, for one, welcome our cephalopod overlords."

I concur. The rise of mollusc-kind is at hand and cannot come too soon.
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I've been enjoying Exisential Comics lately, but this one made me laugh more than usual.
Business Ethics, with Karl Marx
Business Ethics, with Karl Marx
existentialcomics.com
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There are one or two people on here to whom this may be of interest. I can't believe I waited a whole day to share it.
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We, this people, on a small and lonely planet
Traveling through casual space
Past aloof stars, across the way of indifferent suns
To a destination where all signs tell us
It is possible and imperative that we learn
A brave and startling truth...

A Brave and Startling Truth by Maya Angelou, read by astrophysicist Janna Levin.


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So to ask whether Achilles and Odysseus are white or black is at one level to misread Homer. His colour terms aren’t designed to put people into racial categories, but to contribute to the characterisation of the individuals, using subtle poetic associations that evaporate if we just plump for ‘blond’ rather than ‘brown’, ‘tanned’ rather than ‘black’ (and vice versa). Greeks simply didn’t think of the world as starkly divided along racial lines into black and white: that’s a strange aberration of the modern, Western world, a product of many different historical forces, but in particular the transatlantic slave trade and the cruder aspects of 19th-century racial theory.

Colour vocabulary is often felt by its users to be natural and obvious, because the visual register is so immediate and vivid to us. We think that the colours we see are inscribed into the order of things. At a physiological level, indeed, that may be true. But when our brains begin the process of making sense of those neurological signals, then, inevitably, we start using the categories that we have learned from those around us. Looking into the past and training ourselves to see with the eyes of other cultures, are powerful ways of denaturalising our inherited conceptual categories, and of recognising that they are not inevitable. The final irony is that the ancient Greeks, so often thought of in Europe and North America as self-evidently white, would have been staggered at this suggestion.
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Now I know what to ask for for my birthday

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My aim is to create a bowl full of joy
Clear as the sky
Pure as falling cherry petals
Without worry, without doubt
Then comes full energy, endless power
And the road to art

Chiura Obata
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Perhaps the greatness of art lies in the perpetual tension between beauty and pain, the love of men and the madness of creation, unbearable solitude and the exhausting crowd, rejection and consent… On the ridge where the great artist moves forward, every step is an adventure, an extreme risk. In that risk, however, and only there, lies the freedom of art.

Albert Camus, Resistance, Rebellion and Death
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