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Neil Losin
6,138 followers -
Evolutionary biologist, filmmaker, photographer
Evolutionary biologist, filmmaker, photographer

6,138 followers
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Important, sobering stuff from +Tom Levenson on SciAm: There will be significant effects on scientific research and training capacity in the US if the sequester is allowed to happen... Effects that could easily last a generation.

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Already shared by others, but definitely worth a read if you haven't already: http://www.treehugger.com/culture/conservation-photography-and-necessary-evils.html

A few thoughts:
1) Morgan Heim's comments in this article are dead-on.
2) The author is too dismissive of the opposing viewpoint. While I think conservation photographers have a strong sense that the good they're doing outweighs the "necessary evils" like a high carbon footprint (and I have a feeling they're right), I don't think nearly enough work has been done to evaluate the impact of conservation photography projects.

So, does an activity like conservation photography really have a net positive impact on the environment? I suspect it does, but I don't think we have the data to show that conclusively. The NSF now demands a formal evaluation be built in to every science outreach grant they award... Perhaps all of the organizations commissioning conservation media should be doing the same. Yes, evaluation costs money. But in the long run, solid metrics of impact in environmental messaging, ideally shared among organizations, can advance the practice of environmental communication for everyone's good.

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Already shared by others, but definitely worth a read if you haven't already: http://www.treehugger.com/culture/conservation-photography-and-necessary-evils.html

A few thoughts:
1) Morgan Heim's comments in this article are dead-on.
2) The author is too dismissive of the opposing viewpoint. While I think conservation photographers have a strong sense that the good they're doing outweighs the "necessary evils" like a high carbon footprint (and I have a feeling they're right), I don't think nearly enough work has been done to evaluate the impact of conservation photography projects.

So, does an activity like conservation photography really have a net positive impact on the environment? I suspect it does, but I don't think we have the data to show that conclusively. The NSF now demands a formal evaluation be built in to every science outreach grant they award... Perhaps all of the organizations commissioning conservation media should be doing the same. Yes, evaluation costs money. But in the long run, solid metrics of impact in environmental messaging, ideally shared among organizations, can advance the practice of environmental communication for everyone's good.

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The third photo album from our Dos Equis-funded expedition to Uganda's Rwenzori Mountains. In this album, we focus on the amazing plants and animals of the Rwenzori Mountains, many of them found nowhere else on Earth.
Here is the third photo album from our Dos Equis-funded expedition to Uganda's Rwenzori Mountains. Our objective was to document the rapidly disappearing glaciers of the Rwenzoris, but along the way we encountered many other amazing sights. In this album, we focus on some of the unique plant and animal inhabitants of the Rwenzori Mountains.
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Rwenzori Mountains: Mountains of the Moon
25 Photos - View album

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Hugo is an unstoppable fetching machine in the snow. Taken in Boulder CO, February 2013.
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Hugo in the Snow
11 Photos - View album

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Here's the second gallery from our Rwenzori Mountains expedition in January, in which we climb the highest peaks in the range and explore their vanishing tropical glaciers!
Here is the second image gallery from our January expedition to document the rapidly retreating tropical glaciers of Uganda's Rwenzori Mountains. The trip was funded by a Stay Thirsty Grant from Dos Equis. This is what happens when beer money funds science and exploration!
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Rwenzori Mountains: The High Peaks
21 Photos - View album

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Hey all, my buddy +Nathan Dappen is safe in New Jersey in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, but he doesn't have electricity or an Internet connection, and can't promote our Dos Equis project today -- the FINAL DAY of voting... So we need your help getting the word out! Cast your vote for "Men on the Moon" to help us make an awesome film about climate change and tropical glaciers in Africa! Click on "Grant Worthy" to cast your vote!

Please share if you can! In the home stretch, every vote matters. Thanks!!!

http://www.mostinterestingacademy.com/staythirstygrant
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