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Ewan McIntosh
1,978 followers -
Think differently and change the way you work
Think differently and change the way you work

1,978 followers
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I had fun yesterday afternoon catching up with +Niilo Alhovaara who I first met in the early days of +eTwinning Europe . We covered a LOT of ground in 50 minutes. 
Some thoughts after my #BeSmartOnAir   #HangoutOnAir  Interview with +Ewan McIntosh who is one of the most inspirational and innovative people in education I've ever met. Hey, how about a #Soundtrap  session, Ewan?! You just have to check it out, in case you already haven't - cloud-based (Swedish!) magic for musicians! You should hear what +Chris Betcher says in #GoogleEduCast  :) 
http://bit.ly/GoogleEducast186ShowNotes
http://bit.ly/BSoAInterviewEwanMcIntoshBlog

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Greetings everyone from Edinburgh, Scotland. I cannot believe that it is three years since we first launched #r2innovates, and here we are with another round of final pitches of innovative ideas with learning at their heart.

I hope the experiences we helped design, and which are now led independently and, vitally, sustainably by your own fab R2 team, have not only helped build these very specific ideas, but have also provided your teaching, learning and leadership with more toolsets, skillsets and changed mindsets on which to draw.

Kindest regards to you all - do share how it all goes from your perspective, and don't forget to share your pitches online for others to learn from your experiences!

Ewan (http://NoTosh.com)
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Hi everyone! I'll be seeing you in just a couple of days, and wanted to make sure you were prepared for the first part of our day - I posted this about six weeks ago, so hopefully you've had a chance to think of what you're going to share.

I am asking each of you to share your story so far, using the following points to structure your reflection:

// what have you changed in your teaching practice this semester?
// why did you choose this particular area to focus on?
// which design thinking disposition did you help students adopt?
// what kind of connections did you spot between the pedagogical change and the design thinking disposition you were trying to develop?
// what have you learned so far?
// what are your next steps?

We will adopt a TeachMeet type format for sharing these stories, in a mix of whole-room and small group stories. No powerpoint, and the whole story in no more than 7 minutes.

If you have any questions, post them here!

Hi everyone! I'll be seeing you in just a couple of weeks back in Hedensted, and wanted to make sure you were prepared for the first part of our day.

I am asking each of you to share your story so far, using the following points to structure your reflection:

// what have you changed in your teaching practice this semester?
// why did you choose this particular area to focus on?
// which design thinking disposition did you help students adopt?
// what kind of connections did you spot between the pedagogical change and the design thinking disposition you were trying to develop?
// what have you learned so far?
// what are your next steps?

We will adopt a TeachMeet type format for sharing these stories, in a mix of whole-room and small group stories. No powerpoint, and the whole story in no more than 7 minutes.

If you have any questions, post them here!

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Several teams are engaging with students, educators or outside mentors in kick-off workshops this month or next. Often you are seeking to get under the skin of these groups, to find out whether your idea is hitting the mark or not. To help you in your planning, there might be some human-centred design activities that you could use with them - a fun way to get interactive from the get-go in your sessions, AND glean some vital data:

https://delicious.com/ewan.mcintosh/designthinking,tools
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WIIFM? What's in it for me? 

At least two of the teams have what we call "multi-sided business models", in that they principally serve one group (normally students) but rely on keeping another one served and happy, too. Project CASTLE and RecruIT provide good examples of the challenge, and how we might best meet it.

Both deal with a subject close to my heart: attracting mentors and keeping them on board! The photo set here is from one of NoTosh's mentoring projects across the UK for television company Channel 4 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/edublogger/sets/72157627559009709). The key lesson from these photos is this: we took them in the first place. We gave our mentors (and the dog!) as much of a pedestal and spotlight as the students, and helped celebrate our mentors' contribution so that they would come back again!

I talked with +Rachel Mongin and she was already seeing that even after just a round or two of asking mentors to support and inspire young people for as little as an hour every other week, mentor fatigue was at risk of setting in. Mentoring is hard work, and most people don't really know 'how to do it'. The combination of learning how and doing it well (tiring as it is) is enough to turn them off eventually, no matter how enriching they may find it. As Rachel pointed out, many great mentors are entrepreneurs themselves, in a position where every hour counts and often a few extra hours a day wouldn't go amiss.

+Robert D. Hill Jr and +Bennett Weigle are facing a similar challenge with RecruIT in terms of finding regular 'hero geeks' to help more girls enter the realm of computer science.

Running technology incubators for the past seven years, I've seen the reasons given by mentors for taking part in tiring programmes, where they need to tool up on HOW to mentor as much as give over sufficient time to do it well:

1. They enjoy mentoring when there is an opportunity to meet other mentors: you can provide a space for professional networking for the adults as much as anything. So, make sure you design in an opportunity for mentors to get to meet, mingle and work together on a networking type event (a larger company might even sponsor some evening drinks etc).

2. Mentors, often those who are already well equipped to the task, often lack confidence in what to do - especially when it's mentoring youth. Make sure that you have a honed down, specific plan for how you're going to 'train' these mentors, and some concrete materials to give them beforehand. It shouldn't feel daunting to them, but they should get specific advice on how to work with their young person.

3. Consider approaching larger companies to ask them to participate. HQ offices will often struggle to fulfil their "Corporate Social Responsibility" goals, which often include offering x% of staff time for local community projects. Find the top 10 companies in your chosen domain (RecruIT: e.g. IT) and then phone their Human Resources or CSR departments to find out how you can help them help themselves. For example, getting a Hospitality manager in one local hotel is a lot of hassle. But making one call to Hilton's HQ could unlock every Hospitality manager in the State to help out, meaning they don't get fatigued - they only have to help once a year, perhaps.

4. How do you thank mentors? It's not money these people want or need. What bragging rights might they get from this project? How can you help them be celebrated in the places that matter to them?

I hope that's of help, on the theme of mentors. More to come...
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4Talent Mentoring in Media
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Learning online with a simple Google+ Hangout can be incredibly powerful. My time with teams this week has been full of deep learning, with a surprising commonality in challenges at this stage in your projects.

It's been a while since I chipped in to the #r2innovate  community, and having a fresh pair of eyes / ears on your ideas this past few days has hopefully been of help to the teams that I've met with. If I've not met with you yet and you'd like to get some guidance on making your idea grow, just get in touch with +David Bill  (david@notosh.com) and arrange a time through him.

I'll post some of the key highlights from our Google Hangouts over the next day or so.

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I know I bang on about creating a legal entity (a company) with the ambition that it will grow, but this great talk and book sum up some of the reasons why:

http://thedobook.co/products/do-protect-legal-advice-for-startups

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It is worth working through with students what MINDSETS, SKILLSETS and TOOLSETS they might be expected to feel or use as they undertake an activity or project. Have the conversation with them, then debrief after - did they experience that mindset, what could they do better to further develop it?

THESE might form the basis of your own success criteria - how will you know you have succeeded in doing something better than before, over and above academic attainment? This is a good way to test, by asking students before, during and after your projects.

http://www.elevinvents.dk/mindsets-skillsets-toolsets.html
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Here's a reminder of potential pedagogical elements you may wish to build on, from Dylan Wiliam's five key areas:

http://www.elevinvents.dk/which-area-of-pedagogy-do-you-want-to-build-on.html
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