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Charles Vigneron
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Charles Vigneron

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Another n'er do well ancestor. Henry was banished to live with the Indians as punishment.

 HENRY LINNINGTON was born about 1630 in England. He died after 20 Mar 1696/97 in Jamaica, Queens County, New York Colony.

He was married to Catherine Ellison in 1655 in Hempstead, New York. Henry Linnington appears many times in the town records of Hempstead, Long Island, New York, beginning in 1657

“1658, July 6: At a Court holden at Hempstead. Whereas, Henry Linington, besides other evil practices unto the disturbance of Christian order and peace, and to the violation of the laws, to the great dishonor of God and to the evil example of the nations under which we live, hath solicited Deborah Sturgis; Be it therefore ordered that he shall forthwith be committed to the Marshal's custody (who is hererby authorized to apprehend him and in sure and safe manner to keep him in ward, until he shall give sufficient security in recognizance in the value of 500 guilders for his good behavior, in default thereof he is to be sent unto Manhattans, and within 3 months he is to be banished out of the town's limits.)

His bondsmen were his father and brother-in-law, Lawrence and John Ellison. To defend them harmless he bound himself, his chattels and estate, both moveable and unmoveable, to stand in caution and be security.

1659. -- At a Court held May 1: Whereas Lawrence Ellison hath entered into recognizance that Henry Linington should submit to the sentence of the Court pronounced against him, viz.: to depart the town, and mean time to be of good behavior, and so supplicates to have his bond cancelled, the Court doth order that the recognizance will stand in force until the sentence of the Court shall be performed.”

Henry apparently went free on bond, but lived in a state of disgrace for more than one year, until he was restored the liberties of an inhabitant 
[Vol I, page 114]:
“At a Generall towne Meeting the 3rd of Oc’t 1659 Holden at ye howse of Mr Richard Gildersleve, Magestrate
Vpon ye Supplication of Henry Linnington it was this day granted that all former proceedings ags’t him should he remitted, and he was then received againe vpon promise of reformacon vnto ye Liberties of an Inhabitant.
Teste John James, Cle. Seal.

The Records of North and South Hempstead, Long Island, New York, Benjamin D. Hicks, Ed.
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Charles Vigneron

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Trial of Richard Lundy
9 August 1686 O.S.

Att the Court held the 9th of the 6 Moneth 1686. The Governour present George Hutchinson present James Budd, Elias Farre, William Biddle, Thomas Gardner, Francis Davenport Justices. John Allen and Richard Lundy : Indicted: Allen made his escape out of Court and Flees: Richard Lundy Called. appeares. The Indictment being by the Grand Jury found: And Richard Arraigned: Pleades Guilty: and submits to the Judgment of the Bench: The Bench in regards to Richards ingenious confession, and upon the good report given of him, and finding he was threatned and drawne in by Allen  through feare, to marke the Cowe for which they are Indicted they Fyne him but Twenty Shillings: And Richard (paying the same) is Quit by Proclaimation

Burlington Court Book of West New Jersey
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Thank you +P M Dauge , +Bruce Moore 
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Charles Vigneron

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Yes, it is here, too.
soggy doggies like the towel ritual! 
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Charles Vigneron originally shared:
 
"Washington State Patrol troopers discovered a theft of explosives from the Port of Walla Walla’s airport industrial park explosive magazine."

This is after collecting years of Homeland Security monies, the Port of Walla Walla's magazine was not monitored by CCTV. No one lost their job. 
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Charles Vigneron

▶ General Politics  - 
 
Why do we need two legislative houses? It arose for different classes of people: patricians and plebes. Nebraska understood.
I've always found it ironic that the US government was modeled upon the British system at the very time, in Britain, their Commons was none too pleased with the power held by the House of Lords and Crown. 
We gripe about George III forgetting he wasn't popular in the UK. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicameralism
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Yes. Thank you. I've forgotten that part. Compromise. What a strange notion these days.
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Charles Vigneron

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I peruse many files at books.google.com and archive.org. I have an advantage of unique ancestral surnames to trace back to 1790, Independence Twp., Sussex Co., New Jersey. It's all books from there.

This biography is from The Thomas Book, which has a corrupted PDF so I've copied and pasted text. Within the [  ] are details which I'm familiar and are easily found within other books. My ancestor married the eldest daughter, and perhaps worse, became a Quaker! The Lawrence authored genealogies omit his first born, Elizabeth, who married Thomas Stevenson.

[There's a pirate, too!]

THOMAS Lawrence, bapt February 2, 1588-89, probably Chief Burgess of S. Albans in 1622 ; /m., October 23, 1609, JOANE, dau. of Walter and Jane (Amolde) Antrobus 

He died March 20, 1624-25, having had issue : 

i. JOANE, bapt, August 29, 1610 ; d. August 31, 1610. 

ii. JANE, bapt. December 18, 1614, m. GEORGE GIDDINGS. 

iii. MARIE, bapt, November 17, 1616 ; d. November 28, 1616. 

iv. JOHN, bapt. July 26, 16 18, of whom presently. 

v THOMAS, bapt, March 8, 1619-20 {q, v.\ 

vi. WILLIAM, bapt, July 27. 1622 (^. v,), 

vii. MARIE, bapt, April 10, 1625. Came to America with her mother and may have returned with her. [married Thomas Burnham]

Shortly after her husband's death, probably in 1627, JOAN 
(ANTROBUS) LAWRENCE, of S. Albans, tn. JOHN TUTTELL, a mercer, of Ipswich. April 2, 1635, the list of passengers to New England on board the ship Planter, Nicholas Trarice master, 
contains the following : 

John Tuttell, a mercer, aged thirty-nine years. 
Joan Tuttell, aged forty-two years. 
John Lawrence, aged seventeen years. 
William Lawrence, aged twelve years. 
Marie Lawrence, aged nine years. 
Abigail Tuttell, aged six years. 
Simon Tuttell. aged four years. 
Sara Tuttell, aged two years. 
Jo. Tuttell, aged one year. 
Joan Antrobus, aged sixty years (mother of Mrs. Tuttell). 

George Giddings, aged twenty* five years. 
Jane Giddings, aged twenty years {dau. of Mrs. Tuttell). 

John Tuttell, b. 1596, was a freeman, March 13, 1639 ; Representative in 1644, when he was at Ipswich, Mass. Lieutenant in the Provincial forces, a member of the Artillery Company ; probably had more children in America, as Simon and Mary. After a few years 
Savage says he went home and established himself to advantage in Ireland, whither, in 1654, his wife followed him. He d, December 30, 1656, at Carrickfergus, whence his widow writes in 1689 to George Giddings. There is little known of the New England life of the emigrant Lawrences. The sister, Marie, disappears from sight. The second brother, Thomas, came over at a later date. Landing at Plymouth first, they afterward removed to Ipswich, and at about 1644 appear to have gone to Long Island, John, possibly going first and his brothers following him. 

WILLIAM, third son of Thomas and Joan (Antrobus) Lawrence, b, at
St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, and bapt. there July 27, 1622 ; was brought to New England in the ship Planter, by his step-father, John Tuttell, in 1635. Ten years later, with his brother John, October 10, 1645, he was one of the eighteen original incorporators of Flushing on Long Island, and seems to have made that his permanent residence thereafter. April 22, 1655, William Lawrence, Thomas Saul, and Edward Ffarrington were appointed Magistrates of Flushing. March 25, 1656, he was elected by the Council Presiding Magistrate of the town. 

January 26, 1657-58, with Tobias Feke and Robert Ferry, deputies to the Council about the encroachments of Hempstead upon their boundaries. The following letter from him to Governor Stuyvesant is on record : 

“ Honored Sir : 

“Wearas divers of our inhabittants having Cases depending in our Courtt att Vlissing (Flushing) and desiering Isheeuw in ther cases. Edw. Farrintton and William Nobell in regard of ther latte trubell are nott willing to proseed aney ferrder without your honeres forder order this is to request you would be pleased to maniffest your mind in this case to this bearrer W*". Nobell so that wee may ether proseed or forbeare so 1 shall remain 

“ Your humbell Sarvantt 
 William Lawrence. 
 Fllushinge, Jenewarey the 20th 1656 

[This note follows the Flushing Remonstrance, an act which angered the Governor enough to jail Wm. Lawrence's fellow magistrates] 

July 10, 1662, with his brothers, John and Thomas Lawrence, and his father-in-law, Richard Smith, he is among the taxables at Middleburgh (Newtown), Long Island. January 7, 1664, some Indians complain that they were summoned to a conference about some land at 
Flushing by him, but he was not present when they came. In 1665, Captain of the Queen's Co. Militia. September 27, 1666, was one of the jury in a lawsuit between Gravesend and Flatbush. The same year Rev. Francis Doughty, Minister of Flushing, in a suit about his unpaid salary, states that his contract of salary was burnt one year 
before the trial by William Lawrence’s wife, who “put it under a pye in an oven.” He claimed back salary, and the defence was made that Governor Stuyvesant forced them to call him. His son recovered, in 1669, six year's salary, each party to pay their own costs. December 18, 1666, William Lawrence, of Flushing, for seditious words is fined £5, and to make an apology to the Court. 

February 24, 1670-71, “Captain William Lawrence, with consent of the major part of the inhabitants of Flushing, receives a patent of his land where hee lives, with an addition of a piece of swampy meadow ground lyeing within that Neck.” Consent of Thomas Willett and others to this patent was given February 15, 1670-71. 
September 29, 1672, one of his negroes at Flushing is complained of as a thief. August 31, 1673, he is schout or sheriff of Flushing, and several letters to him in that capacity are among the Historical MSS. of the State of New York. The same year commanded the “Flushing Foote Companie,” at the surrender of New York to the Dutch. 
In 1674 either he or his son of the same name has a house 
of the second class, valued at $2,000, on the east side of Broadway between Beaver and Wall Streets, in New York. May 19th of that year, it is complained that " Richard Smith of Nessequack, with the aid of his son-in-law, William Lawrence, the Sheriff,” in a lawsuit, 
“had chosen such jury as were favourible to him.” September 14th 1675, it is ordered by the Council that Captain William Lawrence be “added to ye justices of ye peace of the North Riding of Long Island.” In October, 1677, judgment is entered against him in a suit for £6 19d. 5th. May 7, 1678, the constable and others complain of 
Captain William Lawrence fencing in the highway. April 29, 1679, his negro, Andreas, is convicted of the murder of a squaw ; verdict “conditionally manslaughter.” Early in the next year he died, (14 March) his estate being administered March 25, 1680, by his widow Elizabeth and eldest son (by a former venter) William Lawrence.” The principal items of the inventory returned by Richard Cornell, John Bowne, John Lawrence, and Abraham Whorley on April 19, 1680 (recorded Lib. 2, 212-223) are : 

Tew's Neck houses, etc., 250 acre lots at Whitestone 60. 
50 acre lot No. 13 2a; 50 acre lot at Newton's Neck 15. 
10 four acres in the town 60. 640 acres “Sinken Meddowes 150. 6 shares at Westchester 16. Silver money 135. Plate 7. 

12 leather chairs •* 48. 6 rush chairs 7. 16 One great looking-glass. 
Negroes John, Andreas, Tenny, Harry, Mingo, and Peter, etc 

Total valuation 4,432.1. 10. 




CAPTAIN WILLIAM LAWRENCE had a first wife whose 
name is unknown, by whom he had issue, two sons : 

[and daugther, ELIZABETH, who married Thomas Stevenson. This early Quaker convert is ignored in Lawrence authored genealogies]

i. WILLIAM 

ii. JOHN (q. v.). 

By license dated March 4, 1664, he m., second, ELIZABETH, dau. of Richard Smith, of Nessequack, patentee of Smithtown, L. I. and had further issue : 

MARY, b. in 1665 ; w., first, in 1682 or 83, JAMES EMOTT, Secretary of the Province of New Jersey ; Clerk of the Council, in 16S3 ; Deputy-Secretary, 1684 ; Captain- Lieutenant of a foot company at Perth Amboy, December 11, 1686. He was Counsel for the celebrated pirate, Captain Richard Kidd, and d, at New York in April, 1713, leaving his widow with four sons, and a fortune of £2,000. She w., second, in 1714, REV. EDWARD VAUGHAN, Missionary of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, at Elizabeth, who d. October 12, 1747. 

iv. JOSEPH {q, v.). 

V. THOMAS, b, 1668 ; d, October 26, 1687. 

vi. RICHARD, at school, a pupil of Rev. John Harriman, Puritan pastor at Elizabeth, between 1695 and 1702 ; m. (license, September 24, 1699), CHARITYi dau. of Thomas Gierke, or Clarke, of Brookhaven, Gent. ; and had a dau., CHARITY, m. DAYTON. 

vii. SAMUEL, b, 1672 ; d. August 16, 1687, and with his brother, THOMAS, was buried in the rear of the Meeting-house, at Elizabeth. Their graves are now covered by the First Presbyterian Church, and their  monuments adorn the rear wall of the building, the most ancient stones 
in the cemetery. 

viii SARAH, m. JAMES TILLETT. 

ix. JAMES, of whom nothing is kaomu 

After the death of CAPTAIN WILLIAM LAWRENCE, 
his widow m., second, in April, 1681, the HON. CAPTAIN 
PHILIP CARTERET, b. 1639, Seigneur of the Manor of La Houque, Parish of S. Peter, Island of Jersey, and Governor of the Province of East and West Jerseys, and removed to Elizabeth with her seven children. Like many of the Provincial Governors he was involved in disputes with the local authorities, and by high-handed injustice on their part even imprisoned. 

He d, between December 10 and 20, 1682, leaving his estates in Jersey to his mother, and to “his most deare wife Elizabeth Carteret and her heirs,” all his estate in New Jersey and all his negroes and other servants “except Black Jack who is to be set free.” 
After his death she occupied for over a year and claimed as her own, in her husband’s right, the Government house and property at Elizabeth. May 29, 1684, the Council speak of her” many clamours made against the proprietors and late Governor on pretence of Rong Don her.” In her petition presented to the Hon. Gawen Laurie, Deputy-Governor of the Province of East New Jersey and his Council, she claims : 

“1st, her husbands sallery for being Governor amounteing to the sume of 1000 lb. 
“2d. A patent for 3,596 acres in Elizabeth Towne bounds as expressed in 2 patents when Robert Vicars was Secretary. 
“3d. Patent for lot of land on Rareton River purchased by her husband of the Indians. 
“4th. That the house, lot, and orchard in Elizabeth Towne, now in possession of the proprietors, be delivered to her.” 

“The Bord” answer to 2d and 4th : “patents of that date are voided.” 3d, deny Carteret's having paid for the land. 1st, “is not in their province,” so that her complaints failed to procure her any redress. September 29, 1683, in the list of taxables at Flushing, appears Widow Cartwright (Carteret) “with 4 males, 30 upland acres, and 50 meadows, 2 horses, 14 oxen, 3 cowes, 4 younger cattle, taxed 
£1. 3x. 9^.” In 1685 she m., third, COLONEL RICHARD TOWNLEY, eighth son of Nicholas Townley, of Littleton, Middlesex, England, a junior branch of the Lancashire family of Towneley, of Towneley, and d.^ 171 2.' Colonel Townley emigrated to Virginia in the suite of the Earl of Effingham, Governor of that province in 1683 ; the following year removed to East New Jersey. 
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Charles Vigneron

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I was listening to a radio program about language this weekend A Way With Words and they described the traffic backed up behind a cop as a: copclot. Several other terms, too. 

Could they have called in the registration and found prior speeding citations?
This morning we saw an interesting catch by a traffic cop. It's a long weekend here and there are lots of cops around. Just south of where we live is a longish 80km/h section (usual open road limit is 100km/h). It's slower be...
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Ours must be able to check them the same way. All they need is a 3G connection to get to their servers which must hold this info. They all carry smart phones AFAIK, not sure about laptops here. I would be surprised if they don't have an in-house smart phone app which does a ton of stuff they need and one of them would bee the licence plate.
It is quite possible the speeder had made himself a vehicle of interest by previous behaviour. It was a new-ish car, not the stereotype, but stereotypes are just stereotypes after all. I prefer to think the cop spotted the tailgating before he pulled back and applied some smart thinking.
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Call of the Wild!
Two Shelties call to an ambulance and  firetruck I cannot hear.
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▶ Local Events  - 
 
"Latinos & Democracy" Big Idea Talks

Tuesday, October 8th at 7:00 p.m.  
Is Walla Walla a place that is fair and inclusive to all who live here? What are the experiences of Latino kids in our public schools?  Why are there strikingly few Latino elected officials in those areas of Washington where Latino residents are most highly concentrated?  This talk with Paul Apostolidis, Professor of Politics at Whitman College, draws on research about immigrant workers in our region as well as seven years of Whitman undergraduate research.  All Big Idea Talks programs are free and open to the public.  Come join in the discussion at the Walla Walla Public Library! 
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Story
Tagline
sans 1 1/2 planet consumption
Introduction
A two-generational benefit-divide is the failure of civilization. Removing taxes from the table during a time-of-war, with real long-term costs tending for the maimed and wounded, is immoral. Not paying for wars as we've gone is immoral. Our ancestors who fought in the earliest wars knew deprivation and the society knew they were at war because it hurt. Some people made fortunes and memory fades quickly around the rich. The 20th Century made war a constant existential threat. Go shopping. The state of war held few costs over generations, primarily guarding borders in Europe and Asia. 

Weapons are being bought that the military doesn't want. Where is that money going? rattus anus

——————————————————

Retired printer, dog walker, slow editor/compiler of old stories. 

Genealogy epiphany was: welcome to the herd. 

Historical public-domain/family research through books.google.com and archive.org. local Family Center, familysearch.org , Walla Walla Public Library- Lawrence Dodd Reference Room. Southern Virginian Genealogies CD, Rootsweb, and the many cousins and books I've met along the way. 

Colonial governments, Assemblyman, Burgess, magistrate, JP, military, census, churches & graveyards perhaps most importantly—unique surnames—to great grandparents and grandparents Bibles.

Had been given copies of genealogy/ family history records and set them aside, one for twenty-seven years, before i picked them up in 2009 and began tracing their migrations. Before, I'd've been hard pressed to name more than one great grandparent.

Surnames:

My father's father: Vigneron, Smock/Smoak/Schmuck, Konkle, Chapman, Lundy, Willson, Willets, Jennings, Stevenson, ​​​​Lawrence, Antrobus |/ Seaman, Ellison, Langdon, Linnington, Washburn [New England 1628, Winthrop Fleet 1630, to Long island, 1678 West New Jersey; New England Ur-families] Nicolas and Marie Ann Vigneron, with three sons, arrived in April, 1853. [share slice of Lundy, Mott, Hicks, three 19th Century Quaker families of note; Cornell, Nixon, FDR, WHTaft, Charles Gates Dawes VP, Dan Quayle VP, ancestors, among early Quaker families, Long Island Manorial Merchant/ Hudson Valley Gentry, with many NJ, NY, Penn., published Public-Domain histories, nixonlibrary.gov ; Gary Boyd Roberts; TG]

My father's mother: Pope, Vernon, Reveal, Lee |/ Dague (DAR), Harsh (DAR?), Swinehart, Neff |/ Shinaberry, Meek, Van Horn,Yoakum, Stump, See/Zee. These are Palatinate Germans, Dutch, Irish, Welsh, English; Samuel Pope and William Lee (each DAR at one time, Pope may have since been disqualified, don't know)) are first found in Warrick, New York in 1763 and Garrettown, Frederick County, Virginia, 1740. You don't ask a man about his parentage on the Frontier. We don't really know where they were born for certain. One begins his life story as an apprentice for a cooper being bargained to the local (warlord) militia by the cooper. He provides a birthdate in his pension application. He was awarded the pension. Mr. Pope did see anti-British Army engagements. Precisely whom he was fighting for is uncertain. His company stationed themselves along a major road to upper New York & Canada and I know that some other cousins who desired to escape to Canada were robbed and worse by armed men posing as law. Ohio Public-Domain histories. Rootsweb.

My mother's father: Hoke, Ussery (DAR), Faulkner, Chaires (DAR?, Huguenot) |/ Hudson (DAR), Thurman, Featherstone, Walthal, Ligon, Harris, Worsham, Archer, Wood [Virginia 1609, 1618, 1642, Tidewater planter, port-master, Lt. Col, Maj. Gen. Ur-fathers of the South; Southward into Northern Alabama, Creek Remove, potters, postmaster, lawyer, slave-holder, abolitionist, Alabama Assemblymen 1858/60] An aspirational name such as Cicero Demosthenes Hudson ripples the fabric of space/time. Family-Search, Rootsweb, Southern Virginian Genealogies CD (4,045 page compilation) Gary Boyd Roberts, Douglas Richardson; Ussery are copyright pages beyond. The Chaires family is Huguenot and I've not the money to spend to apply to prove ancestry to apply to their linage society.

My mother's mother: Bornstein, Svenson : 2ºgg Julius Bornstein, Prussian Jew, first record in Boston City Directory late 1840s, Naturalized US, men's haberdasher, San Francisco 1860, murdered at Corinne, Utah Territory, April 1874. Fannie Bornstein died September 1906 having survived the Great Earthquake, they're buried in the Jewish cemetery at Colma, south of San Francisco; 2ºgg Mogens & Anna Svenson dying on the Mormon Trail, Sep and Oct 1866. [Echo Canyon, Big Mountain N of Park City; a region I've well traveled 1975/8 and hiked, ignorant] 
These last are the most recent Old World arrivals, Andrew Hunter Scott Pioneer Company,1866. 



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