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Chad Spinuzzi
Worked at Rhino Stageing
Attended University of life
Lives in Colorado
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Chad Spinuzzi

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Love this shot
 
Milky Way over Erupting Volcano
Image Credit & Copyright: Sergio Montúfar
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150413.html

The view was worth the trip. Battling high winds, cold temperatures, and low oxygen, the trek to near the top of the volcano Santa Maria in Guatemala -- while carrying sensitive camera equipment -- was lonely and difficult. Once set up, though, the camera captured this breathtaking vista during the early morning hours of February 28. Visible on the ground are six volcanoes of the Central America Volcanic Arc, including Fuego, the Volcano of Fire, which is seen erupting in the distance. Visible in the sky, in separate exposures taken a few minutes later, are many stars much further in the distance, as well as the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy situated horizontally overhead.
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Chad Spinuzzi

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Complex interrelationships between Earth and life. Changing levels of a single species can have far-reaching impacts on local plants and animals - and even change the course of rivers. 

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe." John Muir

We have discovered that food chains are also webs - and that complex interrelationships can have far-reaching impacts that are difficult to predict.

The human-led near-extermination of the wolves changed Yellowstone. The human-led attempt to undo the damage changed it, too.  But additional studies show that not all that was lost has been restored:

● Stream hydrology limits recovery of riparian ecosystems after wolf reintroduction. (http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1756/20122977)

● Are wolves saving Yellowstone's aspen? A landscape-level test of a behaviorally mediated trophic cascade. (http://www.wyocoopunit.org/index.php/archives/2010/kauffman-m-j-j-brodie-and-e-s-jules-2010-are-wolves-saving-yello/)

We know that the activities of humans and other species can create fascinating and long-term changes in our environment. Predicting those changes - and how those changes may affect us - remains a difficult and important challenge.

+Stanford University scientists published a study on the loss of animals in the Anthropocene, the Earth's current geologic time period,  where the rise of humans and human activities have begun a significant impact on the Earth's ecosystems. 

[H]uman impacts on animal biodiversity are an under-recognized form of global environmental change. Among terrestrial vertebrates, 322 species have become extinct since 1500, and populations of the remaining species show 25% average decline in abundance. Invertebrate patterns are equally dire: 67% of monitored populations show 45% mean abundance decline. Such animal declines will cascade onto ecosystem functioning and human well-being.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/345/6195/401

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140724171956.htm

"Two billion years ago, cyanobacteria oxygenated the atmosphere and powerfully disrupted life on earth,” [Andrew Revkin] says. “But they didn’t know it. We’re the first species that’s become a planet-scale influence and is aware of that reality. That’s what distinguishes us.”

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-is-the-anthropocene-and-are-we-in-it-164801414/#u4Rc8ff87u3KmGAL.99

  #interconnected   #ecology   #earthscience   #lifescience
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Chad Spinuzzi

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Complex interrelationships between Earth and life. Changing levels of a single species can have far-reaching impacts on local plants and animals - and even change the course of rivers. 

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe." John Muir

We have discovered that food chains are also webs - and that complex interrelationships can have far-reaching impacts that are difficult to predict.

The human-led near-extermination of the wolves changed Yellowstone. The human-led attempt to undo the damage changed it, too.  But additional studies show that not all that was lost has been restored:

● Stream hydrology limits recovery of riparian ecosystems after wolf reintroduction. (http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1756/20122977)

● Are wolves saving Yellowstone's aspen? A landscape-level test of a behaviorally mediated trophic cascade. (http://www.wyocoopunit.org/index.php/archives/2010/kauffman-m-j-j-brodie-and-e-s-jules-2010-are-wolves-saving-yello/)

We know that the activities of humans and other species can create fascinating and long-term changes in our environment. Predicting those changes - and how those changes may affect us - remains a difficult and important challenge.

+Stanford University scientists published a study on the loss of animals in the Anthropocene, the Earth's current geologic time period,  where the rise of humans and human activities have begun a significant impact on the Earth's ecosystems. 

[H]uman impacts on animal biodiversity are an under-recognized form of global environmental change. Among terrestrial vertebrates, 322 species have become extinct since 1500, and populations of the remaining species show 25% average decline in abundance. Invertebrate patterns are equally dire: 67% of monitored populations show 45% mean abundance decline. Such animal declines will cascade onto ecosystem functioning and human well-being.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/345/6195/401

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140724171956.htm

"Two billion years ago, cyanobacteria oxygenated the atmosphere and powerfully disrupted life on earth,” [Andrew Revkin] says. “But they didn’t know it. We’re the first species that’s become a planet-scale influence and is aware of that reality. That’s what distinguishes us.”

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-is-the-anthropocene-and-are-we-in-it-164801414/#u4Rc8ff87u3KmGAL.99

  #interconnected   #ecology   #earthscience   #lifescience
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Have him in circles
18 people
Jesse Wright's profile photo
Karen James's profile photo
Joshwa Oscar Garrison's profile photo
Kay Henrych's profile photo
Abigail Ratchford's profile photo
Donny Gorman's profile photo
Jeff Winchester's profile photo
Kelly Anne Roberts (Tracey)'s profile photo
Kelly Ramone's profile photo
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