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Gwen Sutton
41,635 followers -
Humanitarian, Photographer, capturing life one frame at a time.
Humanitarian, Photographer, capturing life one frame at a time.

41,635 followers
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Great tips for posing and portraits
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Good ideas for wedding photography
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The Supermoon Trilogy
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1/31/18
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I’m hoping my Carolina sky will be clear for the Supermoon!
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By Carol Kuruvilla
First, the moon that morning will be a “supermoon,” since it’s occurring near a perigee, or a time in the moon’s orbit when it is closest to the Earth. This means that the moon will be about 14 percent brighter than usual, according to NASA.

Secondly, it is the second full moon of the month. Full moons are typically separated by 29 days. Usually, every calendar month only has one full moon, but sometimes, a second one squeezes in. When this happens, as it will on Jan. 31, the event is commonly referred to as a “blue” moon.

But what will really make the Jan. 31 moon spectacular for some viewers is the fact that it will be happening during a total lunar eclipse. That means the moon will pass through the Earth’s shadow and take on a reddish glow ― which gives it the nickname “blood moon.”

This is the second supermoon to light up the sky this January. The first occurred on Jan. 1, and was the biggest Americans will see year.

The last time people in North America were treated to a blue moon occurring simultaneously with a total lunar eclipse was over 150 years ago, according to Space.com.

The “super blue blood moon” will be most visible to people on western part of North America, Alaska, and the Hawaiian islands, according to Gordon Johnston, program executive and lunar blogger at NASA. People on the East Coast will not have as great a view, since the eclipse begins just as the moon is about to set and the sky is getting lighter.

Johnston advises East Coasters who want to give moon viewing a chance to be outside at about 6:45 a.m. EST. It’s best to head to a viewing point at a higher elevation, with a clear line of sight to the horizon toward the west.

Americans living in the Central time zone will have a better view. The Earth’s reddish shadow will be noticeable on the moon by about 6:15 a.m. CST.
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1/24/18
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