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Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors
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The psychological quirks that make it tricky to get an accurate read on someone's emotions: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/04/mixed-signals-why-people-misunderstand-each-other/391053/
The psychological quirks that make it tricky to get an accurate read on someone's emotions
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There are few topics that raise as much debate, controversy and angst in the community than pornography. To gain an understanding of this concern, it is first necessary to define the concept of pornography: http://www.psychology.org.au/inpsych/2015/april/smith/
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What makes us happy? What coping techniques work best? How do our emotions work, and what do we do with them? Here are three new studies that offer important and helpful information about how we can all live our lives happier and healthier: http://blogs.psychcentral.com/childhood-neglect/2015/04/3-new-psychology-research-findings-you-should-know-about/
Lets face it. For us human beings, often the most difficult struggles in our lives come from inside of us. We are all essentially walking, talking bundles of emotions and issues. We can’t sleep, we’re in conflict, we get obsessed or we suffer from...
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One creative way to cope with anxiety... drawing mandalas: http://blogs.psychcentral.com/unleash-creativity/2015/04/mandala-anxiety/
Mandala Anxiety is not an easy to untangle and resolve emotion because its roots can run deep into your psyche. There are times when you’re feeling anxious and you simply can’t put your finger on the reasons behind it and yet other times when the...
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Visit http://www.mhpn.org.au/UpcomingWebinars to register for a free webinar, offered by the Mental Health Professionals Network, on supporting older people living independently in the community.
Register to participate in an upcoming live, online panel discussion focused on topical metnal health issues. These live webinars feature a panel of experts in mental health within Australia.
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Val is a training therapist at a counselling institute where she also facilitates experiential groups for trainee counsellors. Steve, a trainee in a group that has recently come to an end, had shared in the group his experience of being emotionally abused by his father as a child. Val has since heard from Steve, who has explained that a situation has arisen with his current training therapist, Mike. Steve tells Val that Mike had encouraged him to participate in a retreat he was leading. Steve was reluctant but Mike persuaded him, saying he thought it would support the work they were doing in therapy. Steve has recently returned from the retreat and found the experience troubling. He doesn’t want to return for further sessions with Mike and, having had a positive experience of Val from the experiential group, wants her to be his training therapist instead. What should Val do?

Source: http://bit.ly/1G8X7RY
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Have them in circles
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The latest edition of our newsletter, focusing on user-friendly therapeutic strategies for intellectual disability, is now available online. Read it here: www.aipc.net.au/ezine (and share)
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Mindfulness can richly complement counselling practice, writes Simon Cole. Drawing on the case of a particular client whose life was dominated by resentment towards her mother, he explains how the principles of compassion and non-judgmental awareness ultimately enabled her to ‘allow the bad things to have been bad things then, without in this moment needing to judge their perpetrator’ and, ultimately, ‘to step over the line’ and ‘let it be’: http://therapytoday.net/article/show/4745/mindfulness-and-counselling/
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Are electronic devices the reason why some kids struggle with nonverbal communication? Should parents make more time for face-to-face activities? http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/19/fashion/hey-kids-look-at-me-when-were-talking.html?_r=0
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Despite all the negative attention it’s gotten, there isn’t much evidence that a wandering mind causes significant harm: http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2015/04/healthy-to-let-your-mind-wander.html
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What would you rather do right now, write down the last conversation you had or watch a funny video guaranteed to make you laugh? What about a month from now—do you think you’d rather read about a random conversation you had last month or watch another funny video? These are some of the questions researchers asked in a recent set of studies (link is external) exploring our tendency to underestimate how much pleasure we get out of rediscovering mundane experiences: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/between-you-and-me/201503/the-benefits-embracing-the-ordinary
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Young people long to leave the family home but are often just as powerfully terrified to go, writes Jim Pye. Here he discusses separation and its role in the turbulence of adolescent development, using examples from his own work and from fiction to illustrate how hard it can be both for a young person to make the transition to independent adulthood and for the parent(s) to release them: http://therapytoday.net/article/show/4752/separation-and-stuckness/
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Australia’s largest provider of counselling courses including the Diploma of Counselling, Bachelor of Counselling and Graduate Diploma of Counselling.
Introduction
The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors (AIPC) is a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) and Higher Education Provider (HEP) that delivers counselling courses at vocational (Diploma of Counselling) and higher education (Bachelor of Counselling; Graduate Diploma of Counselling) levels to students throughout Australia and Overseas.

AIPC has a particular focus on flexible learning, through supported external and online training. AIPC is the largest provider of counselling courses in Australia, specialising in counsellor education for over twenty four years. Students graduate with a high level of knowledge and skill to perform competently in a variety of employment settings. Course structures focus on students learning a variety of approaches and enable students to develop progressively to a professional level; as well as grow personally as an individual.

AIPC courses are a journey of self discovery, providing students with a deep insight into why they think and behave as they do. Graduates are well prepared to pursue a career in counselling – employed or self-employed – enjoying strong industry reputation and linkage. All courses are accredited by the Australian Counselling Association (ACA).
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1800657667
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Locked Bag 15 Fortitude Valley QLD 4006 Australia