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Advanced Hearing Group - Mesa
33 followers
33 followers
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Remember, you can’t always understand what someone is going through until you live it.
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It’s always a good reminder to be kind to everyone you meet. Everyone has hard times. Theirs could be now.
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This is a great resource for the emotional support side of #hearingloss and how to keep life going on. http://ht.ly/1MkF30h2kTv
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Although #digitalhearingaidtechnology is often the recommended treatment for the majority of sensorineural hearing loss cases, less than 20 percent of those who would benefit from treatment actually seek it. http://ht.ly/AEvw30h2kJQ
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Being #deaf does NOT make you dumb! People who are #hearingimpaired can accomplish the same things as anyone with hearing! http://ht.ly/lypb30h3mp9
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Ear Wax: What is it, and how to SAFELY remove it!

Everyone makes ear wax, but the amount and type are genetically determined, just like hair color or height. Smaller or oddly shaped ear canals may make it difficult for the naturally occurring wax to get out of the canal and lead to wax impactions.

Ear canals are generally considered to be self-cleaning. This means that ear wax and sloughed skin cells typically pass on their own from the inside of the ear canal to the outer opening. Old earwax moves from the deeper areas of the canal out to the opening. At the opening of the canal the ear wax usually dries up and falls out of the canal.

So, what makes ear wax worse? Narrowing of the canal resulting from infections or diseases of the skin, bones, or connective tissue. Production of a less fluid form of cerumen (more common in older persons due to aging of the glands that produce it). Overproduction of cerumen in response to trauma or blockage within the canal. Things that you put in your ears to clean them like Q-tips, hair pins or keys. Hearing aids and earphones can also cause an excessive amount of ear wax build up.

Too many individuals reach for a Q-tip to remove ear wax, but DON'T.

Most attempts to clean the ears by using cotton swabs only result in pushing the wax further into the ear canal, resulting in an impaction. The reason for this is that ear wax is not formed in the deep part of the canal near the eardrum, but only in the outer part of the canal near the external opening.

When you probe your ear with things like Q-Tips, bobby pins, or twisted napkin corners, they only serve as ramrods to push the wax deeper into the ear and can lead to some serious complications.

If you think you have a buildup of ear wax, please seek the advice of a hearing professional. Excessive wax in the ears can cause different symptoms and signs, including: earache, sense of fullness in the ears, hearing problems, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), cough, itching or discharge from the ear canal.

After examining your ear, and your audiologist determines that your ear drum is intact, then it's time to pull the wax clog out. They may need to wash it out (known as lavage), remove it by suctioning, or remove it with special instruments. Alternatively, a doctor may prescribe ear drops that are designed to soften the wax.

Bottom line - leave ear wax removal to the specialists and do NOT put anything in your ear canal trying to clean it out.

#earwaxremoval, #earwax, #audiologist, #eardoctor, #hearingloss, #hearinghealth
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Fact or myth? You’ll never be able to afford #hearingaids. We work with plenty of insurance companies but we also suggest you research the Hearing Loss Association of America’s list of financial resources and organizations that can help. http://ow.ly/BtTN30e4WsR
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What You Need to Know to Cope with Tinnitus

We have all probably experienced a bit of ringing in the ears at some point. Sometimes caused by an ear infection or exposure to a loud boom, and if you’re lucky, it goes away. But one in ten adults (especially those over age 60) are affected by a more permanent ringing in their ears called tinnitus.

Caused by things like noise, ear infections, cardiovascular disease, traumatic brain injuries and so much more, tinnitus is a hearing condition that in some cases just cannot be treated or cured. In that case, knowing how to cope with the ringing in your ears can help ease some of the burden that it causes.

While none of these tips take the ringing away, they can help to make them less noticeable or prevent the condition from worsening.

• Avoid anxiety or stress which can stimulate an already-sensitive hearing system.
• Get lots of rest and avoid getting fatigued.
• Do not use nervous system stimulants like caffeine, alcohol or smoking (nicotine).
• Sleep with your head propped up and elevated with an extra pillow or two which can lessen head congestion and reduce the ringing.
• Know that tinnitus is often more noticeable at night when things settle down. Have a ticking clock or play soft music at night to mask the ringing in your ears.
• Use a tinnitus masker if needed.
• Discuss using hearing aids with an audiologist. They amplify sounds and mask the ringing.
• Avoid further damage to your hears from excessive noise exposure, occupational hazards and use hearing protection when necessary.
• Seek counseling if you feel depressed or cannot deal with the emotional distress tinnitus can cause.

Seek the advice and guidance of one of our audiologists today!

#tinnitus, #tinnitustreatment, #hearingloss, #hearingaids, #audiologist
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Hearing Aids - Wear them!

Hearing aids can add so much to your life if you are hard of hearing. It’s crazy to not to look seriously at addressing your hearing loss, if you have been diagnosed with it! Hearing aid wearers are less likely to be depressed and have a much lower risk of dementia than non-hearing aid wearers.

Let’s face it, if you have hearing loss, wearing hearing aids improves your social life, confidence and how well you interact generally with the world around you.

Health professionals hear all kinds of reasons why clients don’t wear their hearing aids. One main reason is that they just don’t think that they help, and that they aren’t comfortable to wear. It’s so important to work closely with your audiologist to make sure you are fitted, and in some cases, refitted properly.

It’s also extremely important to be realistic and patient. Unlike eyeglasses, which can produce instant results, it takes time to adjust to hearing aids. Remember, your brain is being asked to process sounds it hasn’t heard in a long time – or maybe even ever. Be patient and give yourself at least six to eight weeks to acclimate.

Hearing better can make you feel better about yourself. Whatever your reason may be for not using your hearing aids, the truth is that you’re missing the chance to fully connect. Whether it’s details on the big project in the office, the latest gossip in a classroom hallway, or a heartfelt moment with your significant other, hearing is a critical part of your daily life.

#hearingaids, #audiologist, #hearingcare, #hearingaidfit, #hearingdoctor, #hearingloss
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