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Cognic Systems
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Transcending New Horizons
Transcending New Horizons

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May 15, 2004
Largest Known Prime Number Discovered

Josh Findley discovered the 41st Mersenne prime, 224,036,583 - 1. He found it using a 2.4-GHz Pentium 4 computer. A Mersenne prime number is one less than a power of two expressed as Mn = 2n - 1. For this to be true, the exponent n must also be prime. Mersenne primes have a close connection to perfect numbers, which are equal to the sum of their proper divisors. The study of Mersenne primes was motivated by this connection. In the 4th century B.C. Euclid demonstrated that if M is a Mersenne prime, then M(M+1)/2 is a perfect number. In the 18th century, Leonhard Euler proved that all even perfect numbers have this form. No odd perfect numbers are known and it is suspected that none exist. It is currently unknown whether an infinite number of Mersenne primes exist.

via- Computer History Museum
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Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.
-Einstein
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"All our dreams can come true - if we have the courage to pursue them." ~Walt Disney
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This Day in the History of the Computers

2nd May, 1983

Microsoft Introduces 2-button MouseMicrosoft Corp. announced the two-button Microsoft Mouse, which it introduced to go along with its new Microsoft Word processor. Microsoft built about 100,000 of these fairly primitive units for use with IBM and IBM-compatible personal computers but sold only 5,000 before finding success in a 1985 version that featured, among other improvements, near-silent operation on all surfaces.

- source COMPUTER HISTORY MUSEUM
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"One person with passion is better than forty people merely interested."— E. M. Forster
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YEAR(1942)

The Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC) is completed. After successfully demonstrating a proof-of-concept prototype in 1939, Atanasoff received funds to build the full-scale machine. Built at Iowa State College (now University), the ABC was designed and built by Professor John Vincent Atanasoff and graduate student Cliff Berry between 1939 and 1942. The ABC was at the center of a patent dispute relating to the invention of the computer, which was resolved in 1973 when it was shown that ENIAC co-designer John Mauchly had come to examine the ABC shortly after it became functional.

The legal result was a landmark: Atanasoff was declared the originator of several basic computer ideas, but the computer as a concept was declared un-patentable and thus was freely open to all. This result has been referred to as the "dis-invention of the computer." A full-scale reconstruction of the ABC was completed in 1997 and proved that the ABC machine functioned as Atanasoff had claimed.
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The first Bombe is completed. Based partly on the design of the Polish “Bomba,” a mechanical means of decrypting Nazi military communications during WWII, the British Bombe design was greatly influenced by the work of computer pioneer Alan Turing and others. Many bombes were built. Together they dramatically improved the intelligence gathering and processing capabilities of Allied forces.
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