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Richard Toscan
3,089 followers -
Author of Playwriting Seminars 2.0, the Handbook used by playwrights, screenwriters, literary managers & novelists.
Author of Playwriting Seminars 2.0, the Handbook used by playwrights, screenwriters, literary managers & novelists.

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One of my projects from A Long Time Ago in a Galaxy Far Far Away...

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There's been a lot of deserved heat generated in the last few days by a US theatre company that has seemed to have trampled the relationship playwrights expect to have with producing organizations. Here's the fine response from the President of the Dramatists Guild to the director of this theatre:

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PAGE Int'l Screenwriting Awards stats for 2015 just out-- this from 6,700+ submissions from over 70 countries, most from the US:
Action/Adventure:  969
Comedy:  1091
Drama:  1374
Family Film:  468
Historical Film:  490
Science Fiction:  597
Thriller/Horror:  922
Short Film:  402
TV Drama Pilot:  695
TV Comedy Pilot:  389

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If you're wondering why action films dominate Hollywood -- a question that comes up among screenwriters on a regular basis -- here's the answer. The Wall Street Journal has just put together a handy chart of overseas Box Office grosses (non-North America compared to total gross) and you can guess what sort of films lead the genre pack by roughly the distance from the earth to the moon. It's also interesting that PG13 is the sweet spot for Box Office returns, roughly double PG and R (G barely registers). And horror, a genre that attracts a lot of attention from low-budget US producers and thus from a lot of early-career screenwriters, comes in near the bottom. The chart:

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J. C. Chandor, Academy Award nominated writer-director best known for Margin Call, on driving his characters in A Most Violent Year:

"It's structured as a gangster film, but really it's about the closing of a business transaction. There's nothing more fascinating to me than where capitalism rubs up against the real world. It's not normal film fodder. I'd aways been interested in family owned businesses where you've got a husband and wife and it was sort of started as a mom-and-pop shop. When this film begins, they're in a very comfortable position. The core idea is, what is it in certain people that after they've reached that point, they're still willing to put everything back on the line again to continue to grow? All of my three films are about ordinary workaday individuals, but you're visiting with them in extraordinary times, those moments of crucible when you're either going left or right. There is no center path."

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J. C. Chandor, Academy Award nominated writer-director best known for Margin Call, on driving his characters in A Most Violent Year:

"It's structured as a gangster film, but really it's about the closing of a business transaction. There's nothing more fascinating to me than where capitalism rubs up against the real world. It's not normal film fodder. I'd aways been interested in family owned businesses where you've got a husband and wife and it was sort of started as a mom-and-pop shop. When this film begins, they're in a very comfortable position. The core idea is, what is it in certain people that after they've reached that point, they're still willing to put everything back on the line again to continue to grow? All of my three films are about ordinary workaday individuals, but you're visiting with them in extraordinary times, those moments of crucible when you're either going left or right. There is no center path."

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J. C. Chandor, Academy Award nominated writer-director best known for Margin Call, on driving his characters in A Most Violent Year:

"It's structured as a gangster film, but really it's about the closing of a business transaction. There's nothing more fascinating to me than where capitalism rubs up against the real world. It's not normal film fodder. I'd aways been interested in family owned businesses where you've got a husband and wife and it was sort of started as a mom-and-pop shop. When this film begins, they're in a very comfortable position. The core idea is, what is it in certain people that after they've reached that point, they're still willing to put everything back on the line again to continue to grow? All of my three films are about ordinary workaday individuals, but you're visiting with them in extraordinary times, those moments of crucible when you're either going left or right. There is no center path."

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I'm hoping this is real progress in providing financial support to US playwrights:

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I'm hoping this is real progress in providing financial support to US playwrights:
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