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"Yet another academic has defamed Ayn Rand, and yet more publications have featured the defamation. Smears of Rand are commonplace these days in popular, leftist, and conservative publications. The latest smear, by Boston College professor Alan Wolfe, is one of the most outrageous." —Ari Armstrong

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https://www.theobjectivestandard.com/…/the-ayn-rand-equals…/
The latest attempt to smear Ayn Rand, by Boston College professor Alan Wolfe, crumbles to dust with the slightest breath of evidence.
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The Left is getting desperate. Good.
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"Inequality in a free society is a consequence of people’s natural differences and their freely chosen values, efforts, and actions." —Ari Armstrong 
If everyone’s rights are equally protected under the law, it does not matter, morally speaking, that we do not earn or possess equal wealth.
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"My read is that, as president, Rubio would half-heartedly seek to modestly reign in taxes and (some) regulations while energetically devoting his energies to advancing his faith-based agenda. For advocates of reason, rights, and liberty, that is a bad mix." —Ari Armstrong 
Marco Rubio's campaign announcement indicates he would reign in some taxes and regulations, and energetically pursue his faith-based agenda.
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"Senator Ted Cruz—who may prove to be the best (or least-bad) candidate America will see in the 2016 presidential race—just launched his campaign for the presidency in a markedly mixed way.

"He launched it at Jerry Falwell’s Liberty University and did so with additional pandering to the so-called 'religious right' (which, in fact, is not part of the right). Among his unfortunate claims, Cruz said our rights 'come from God Almighty'—which for an educated man in 2015 is ridiculous, and for a reader of Ayn Rand is exceedingly ridiculous. He also lamented that today 'roughly half of born again Christians aren’t voting,' and he asked his audience to imagine 'millions of people of faith all across America coming out to the polls and voting our values.'

"But Cruz didn’t harp for long on such heavily religious themes. Instead, he turned to some important economic and political matters, about which he provided an indication of what he intends to do if he is elected president. Here are some of the positive changes he asked his audience to envision...." 
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"It’s no coincidence that Apple revolutionized the personal computer industry, the music industry, and the mobile phone industry. In each field Apple’s goal was not merely to create products to make money. Apple’s aim was to fundamentally challenge the assumptions of each industry. Apple had (and appears still to have) one of the clearest whys in American business. Every business decision, every marketing campaign, every product resonated this reason for being." —Kirk Barbera 
Simon Sinek shows that what distinguishes fabulously successful business leaders is their clarity in defining why they do what they do.
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For commentary from an Objectivist perspective, visit www.TheObjectiveStandard.com.
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"If Westerners want to win the cultural war against Islam, we must be willing to recognize—and to openly acknowledge—the fundamental and relevant truths of the matter. Those truths include the fact that Islam is a religion, and the fact that faith is not a means of knowledge.

"Conservatives are uncomfortable with these facts because they are religious themselves, and they want religion and faith to be good things. But discomfort with facts doesn’t alter them. And wanting things to be good doesn’t make them so.

"The solution to discomfort arising from the fact that Islam is a religion is not to pretend that Islam is not a religion, but to recognize and accept the fact that religion as such is inherently irrational and potentially murderous because it posits a non-rational means of knowledge." —Craig Biddle
If Westerners want to win the cultural war against Islam, we must recognize that Islam is a religion and that faith is irrational.
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The Parable of the Fish Capitalist

Once upon a time, on a small island in the middle of a vast ocean, toiled a primitive society of one hundred people who ate only fish. Each person was able, using only his hands, to catch a single fish each day, and each fish provided the catcher with enough nutrition for roughly a day.

Because everyone’s wealth or lack thereof was essentially equal, this was a society of perfect economic equality. Everyone earned the exact same income—one fish per day—and everyone was equally and horrifically poor. The island people went naked or wore garments hastily woven from leaves. They lived in caves, under bushes, or in shabby lean-tos. They did their best to fend off attacking animals, and occasional pirates, with sticks and rocks. They had no technology aside from simple, handmade tools; no transportation except walking and swimming; no entertainment except singing around the campfire or playing rock-toss games or the like; no health care except the local witch doctor’s potions and prayers. But for the lack of fast-food restaurants, tents made from petroleum products, mobile devices, Internet service, nearby emergency clinics, and bongs, the island was an Occupy Wall Streeter’s dream come true.

In Piketty’s terms, the private rate of return on capital in this island society, r, was zero—because there was no capital income and almost zero capital—and the rate of economic growth, g, was likewise zero. It was a society in blissful leftist perfection where r = g, and no one had to worry about the “terrifying” consequences of expanding capital or inequality. Of course, people frequently died from complications in childbirth, infectious diseases, accidental injuries, animal attacks, and countless other normal circumstances and conditions of primitive society. And, consequently, the average life span was thirty years. But never mind that, for this society avoided the “destabilizing” condition in which r > g.

Now one innovative fellow, Grock, got to thinking about a new way to catch fish, and, over the course of much mental effort, he developed an idea for a contraption akin to what we have come to call a net. Inspired by his idea, Grock committed himself to spending some of his rest time working on a physical version of the net. Once in a while he even skipped fishing for a day and went hungry to work on the project. He had no certainty that all this time, effort, and hunger would amount to anything useful, but he took a risk to see his vision through.

When the net was completed, the project had taken Grock a total of eighty hours of work—the equivalent of ten workdays, or the time equivalent of ten hand-caught fish. Excited, but with some trepidation, Grock waded with the net into the cool waters one morning, and . . . joyous day!—by sundown he managed to catch two fish, a feat he soon would learn that he could repeat every day. That night, Grock jubilantly celebrated his invention—the first piece of substantial capital on the island.

Importantly, Grock did not do anything to harm anyone in the process of creating or using the net, nor did anyone help him in the process of producing it. Of course, he incurred considerable pain and expense himself to make it, and he did so with no guarantee that it would work. But the effort was all his. He alone designed and wove the net. Grock was a sole proprietor, and he was perfectly peaceful.
But Grock’s neighbor, Pike, became gravely concerned about Grock’s innovation. Pike confronted Grock the morning after Grock’s first day of catching two fish.

“Think of the terrifying consequences of your fish net,” Pike warned. “Prior to your creation of that device, we lived in blissful utopia in which r = g, but now r > g! Before, both r and g were zero, but now the capital stock—your net—is worth ten fish, and, given that you now catch an extra fish per day, the private rate of return on capital is one fish daily. But total daily output has not grown by the same percentage; instead, it has grown by only one percent on the first day, from one hundred to one hundred one fish (ninety nine the rest of us catch plus your two). And every day hereafter (with existing capital), g returns to zero. Not only is r > g; r is much greater than g! Just think where this could lead...
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If everyone’s rights are equally protected under the law, it does not matter, morally speaking, that we do not earn or possess equal wealth.
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"In an important article in the Wall Street Journal, 'Why Islam Needs a Reformation,' Ayaan Hirsi Ali calls for a kind of reformation that actually can happen.

"Although in some parts of her article Ali speaks of reforming 'Islam itself'—a goal made impossible by the fact that Islamic scripture is historically set—her overarching aim is to persuade certain kinds of Muslims to reform the way in which they approach Islam.

"Ali identifies three different groups of Muslims: Medina Muslims, Mecca Muslims, and Muslim dissidents. These groups amount to: those who take Islam seriously, those who take it semi-seriously, and those who choose to think critically about the religion. Ali's goal is to persuade Mecca Muslims to become Muslim dissidents, to examine Islam critically, to judge it accordingly, and, preferably, to do what she and a small minority have done: exit the death cult." —Craig Biddle
Ayaan Hirsi Ali calls for a kind of Islamic reformation that actually can happen; Westerners should support her efforts wholeheartedly.
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"Don’t be fooled by the pastel exterior of The Grand Budapest Hotel. Although laced with comedic elements, this is a serious film with important things to say about suffering and hope, betrayal and courage, brutality and love. It is strange but worth a visit." —Ari Armstrong
Laced with comedic elements, The Grand Budapest Hotel is a serious film with an important message about suffering, hope, brutality and love.
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A magazine for people of reason.
Introduction
Looking for an Objectivist magazine? Interested in Ayn Rand or Atlas Shrugged?

The Objective Standard is the preeminent periodical written from an Objectivist perspective (Objectivism being Ayn Rand’s philosophy of reason, egoism, and laissez-faire capitalism).

TOS is a quarterly journal based on the idea that for every human concern—from personal matters to foreign policy, from the sciences to the arts, from education to legislation—there are demonstrably objective standards by reference to which we can assess what is true or false, good or bad, right or wrong. The purpose of the journal is to analyze and evaluate ideas, trends, events, and policies accordingly.

We maintain that the standards of both knowledge and value derive from the facts of reality; that truth is discovered only by means of reason (i.e., through observation and logic); that the factual requirements of man’s life on earth determine his moral values; that the selfish pursuit of one’s own life-serving goals is virtuous; and that individual rights are moral principles defining the fundamental requirements of a civilized society.

We stand opposed to the notion that the standards of knowledge and value are not factual but subjective (feeling-based) or other-worldly (faith-based); that truth is ultimately dictated by majority opinion or a “supernatural” being’s will; that democratic consensus or “God’s word” determines what is moral; that sacrifice for “the common good” or in obedience to “God’s commands” is virtuous; and that rights are social conventions or “divine decrees.”

In stark contrast to these philosophic approaches, ours is a philosophy of reality, reason, egoism, and laissez-faire capitalism—the philosophy first presented by Ayn Rand in her masterwork, Atlas Shrugged.

(For elaboration, see “Introducing The Objective Standard” and “Atlas Shrugged and Ayn Rand’s Morality of Egoism.")