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Daniel Bor
Works at University of Sussex
Attended Oxford University
Lives in Cambridge, UK
2,382 followers|148,990 views
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Occupation
Scientist and Author
Employment
  • University of Sussex
    Scientist and Author, present
  • MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge
  • Cambridge University
  • University of Sussex
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Cambridge, UK
Previously
London, UK - Chatham, UK - Watford, UK - Bournemouth, UK - Borehamwood, UK - Oxford, UK - Cambridge, UK
Story
Introduction
I've worked for about 13 years as a research scientist, studying cognitive neuroscience, mainly at Cambridge, UK (MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit), where I still live.

I took a small break from research in 2008, to become a writer.  My first book, a popular science book on the science of consciousness, THE RAVENOUS BRAIN, will be out on 1st September 2012 (published by Basic Books, US).  My second book will probably be a novel about science, but I haven't as yet approached publishers for this.

I also occasionally write articles for popular science magazines, such as Scientific American, and would be keen to do more of this, time permitting.

As of Feb 2010, I returned to research, mainly carrying out neuroimaging work exploring the nature consciousness and how the brain supports this unique process, at the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science at the University of Sussex in Brighton, UK.

As a scientist, I've carried out research (mainly brain-scanning) on intelligence, strategic thinking, memory, mathematical thinking and chunking.  I've studied normal people, those with focal brain damage, and people with autism and synaesthesia.  I mainly carried out research into the prefrontal cortex in the human brain.

I've been married to Rachana Ramarao since 2001, and our first child, a daughter, Lalana, was born in August 2010.
Education
  • Oxford University
  • Cambridge University
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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Daniel Bor

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Had great time over the last two days at the BBC Radio / Wellcome Trust Workshop with lots of fascinating writers, producers and co-scientists. Hopefully our pitches will lead to science-inspired Radio 4 dramas at some point.
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Daniel Bor

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Is this one of the most beautiful nature videos ever? Incredible landscapes and starscapes:
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Excellent critical review by +Daniel Simons on the recent Nature ageing multitasking Nature paper
 
19 questions about a new Nature paper -- a HI-BAR commentary

In this post, I ask 19 questions about a paper just published in Nature that has received extensive media coverage. The paper showed that multitasking training of older adults led to improved performance and transfer to other outcome measures. My questions address some of the limitations of this study and what really can be concluded from it.  
HI-BAR (Had I Been A Reviewer) A post-publication review of Anguera et al (2013). Video game training enhances cognitive control in older adults. Nature, 501, 97-101. For more information about HI-BAR reviews, see my po...
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Impressive results: multitasking training in elderly improves various cognitive measures for at least 6 months:
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v501/n7465/full/nature12486.html
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Scary fact of the month - my (formerly) little baby is 3 years old today. And she's already talking about getting married and having kids - though admittedly only with her beloved teddy bear, Owly, as the husband.
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Owly sounds ideal!
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Daniel Bor

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Pleased to find prediction from my book, THE RAVENOUS BRAIN, that synesthesia more common in autistics is true: 
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Also see this paper just published with the same message: http://www.frontiersin.org/human_neuroscience/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00847/abstract
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Also,@jameskilner(UCL) and I were chatting on Twitter yesterday about fig 3 (in some ways the most critical bit, as that highlights the transfer effect positive results)  and he thought (and I suspected he's right) that from eyeballing Fig 3d with so many WM results hovering around 0ms, it's unlikely that the multitasking group have a significant improvement on the Pre–post WM task with distractions (fig 3a cross). Also, they might only be sig different from controls as both control groups in figs 3a and b had a strange decline in performance on these tasks. It's very hard to tell with just p scores and not properly quoted stats. He's asked the authors for the data from these figures to check up on this. I don't think he's heard back yet, though.
HI-BAR (Had I Been A Reviewer) A post-publication review of Anguera et al (2013). Video game training enhances cognitive control in older adults. Nature, 501, 97-101. For more information about HI-BAR reviews, see my po...
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+Tommi Himberg Yes. I do hope the authors will respond and clarify some of the method and analysis questions. They could address many of them by posting their data. Some of the criticisms are about broader substantive issues, though -- not sure those can be addressed (e.g., lack of checks for expectations, possible differential placebo effects, relative worthlessness of no-contact controls, etc). With the availability of unlimited supplementary materials online, it's hard to see why relevant information needed to be left out. That said, I recently was looking through the game training literature with the goal of looking at pre- and post-test scores in different groups, and almost none of the papers provide that information. They all just report difference scores. That should change, especially when the claims are based on comparisons of those difference scores and you need to know whether they are driven by improvements or unexpected declines.
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A friend just posted this photo of the Italian version of my book, The Ravenous Brain, from a bookshop in Milan.
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I'll be on the lookout for the English version!
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