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Mikko Rauhala
Works at University of Helsinki
Attended University of Helsinki
Lives in Helsinki
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Mikko Rauhala

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"Yearly reminder: Unless you're over 60, you weren't promised flying cars. You were promised an oppressive cyberpunk dystopia. Here you go."
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"A claim like “one in a million chance of X” not only implies that your model is strong enough to spit out those kinds of numbers, but that there’s only a one in a million chance you’re using the wrong model, or missing something, or screwing up the calculations."

"And speaking of aliens, imagine if an alien learned about this particular human quirk. I can see them thinking “Yikes, what kind of a civilization would you get with a species who routinely go around believing opposite things, always with 99.99…% probability?”

Well, funny you should ask.

I write a lot about free speech, tolerance of dissenting ideas, open-mindedness, et cetera. You know which posts I’m talking about. There are a lot of reasons to support such a policy. But one of the big ones is – who the heck would burn heretics if they thought there was a 5% chance the heretic was right and they were wrong? Who would demand that dissenting opinions be banned, if they were only about 90% sure of their own? Who would start shrieking about “human garbage” on Twitter when they fully expected that in some sizeable percent of cases, they would end up being wrong and the garbage right?"
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Mikko Rauhala

S-polkupyörä ja Segway sekä muut kevyt ajoneuvot  - 
 
Kuinkahan Suomi-laillinen tuollainen olisi? Meneekö mopon spekseihin?
VOMO. The world's most affordable high performance electric scooter ever! LIMITED TIME from $349! | Crowdfunding is a democratic way to support the fundraising needs of your community. Make a contribution today!
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Siis jos rajoittaa maks nopeuden
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Earlier Volkswagen demoed wireless EV charging technology which, in part, enabled automated parking to charge. The goal was that you could send your car to the charging point all on its own to charge, and after it's full, it would automatically vacate the charger in favour of a regular parking spot, so as to not hog the charging points. The tech demo seemed to work well enough.

But you don't really need wireless charging to do that, and old-fashioned wires probably allow for faster charging (and certainly more energy-efficient charging) than inductive solutions. Tesla is also experimenting with autopilot, so I expect this will play into that quite nicely. I imagine some Tesla owners with too much money (hmh, was I being redundant there?) might want a robotic tentacle of their own as well though.

As a side note Tesla patched some security vulnerabilities in their car. They only mention that the shutdown exploit was accomplished locally, not remotely, but it's unclear whether that's an actual requirement. I have been expecting Tesla exploits for a while now, given that they do over-the-air upgrades...
A video posted on Tesla's Twitter account today shows the probing metal snake slithering its way to the car before beginning the charging process. It is not yet known when it will be available.
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Solid Snake charger?
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Small victories: Irritatingly, if minorly, wounded big toe, but found a record of my last tetanus shot only 7 years ago.
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Well this is going to be interesting to follow, what with all the implications until the effects in humans are verified/debunked, and in the first case, synthesized.
The long read: A series of experiments has produced incredible results by giving young blood to old mice. Now the findings are being tested on humans. Ian Sample meets the scientists whose research could transform our lives
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PALO ALTO, CA—Asserting that the utmost precaution was being taken to safeguard the future of humanity, leading scientists and engineers said Tuesday that they were confident in their ability to program artificially intelligent machines to be lenient slave masters.
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Oo-kay, that was kind of scary for half a second before I could think. Blister born of a tiny puncture wound in the big toe had a big black circle on it.

Sock fluff.
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Apparently I can't comment on Guido Stepken's USB network post for some reason. Possibly he doesn't want people pointing out that his proposed networking method does not actually work. Don't waste your time with it. (You'll note even the picture has Ethernet hubs, not USB hubs.)

Technically, USB3 has optional host to host functionality that could be used to network two hosts, but last I checked this feature intended for debugging purposes wasn't very widely supported in hardware or in Linux (this was a couple of years ago, though a quick Google doesn't find that this would've changed; feel free to correct me on this part).

There are also special USB host-to-host network devices but those have active circuitry to present themselves as USB network controllers to both hosts. They are not simple cables.
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Me, too, apparently. Though at first I hoped he'd simply removed his  post but it's probably still on, just not for me. I have to wonder if he's a liability for the group if he's spewing out false information and actively resisting corrections.
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Kaj posted a good bit on why this is endorseable. (I've no affiliation except as a long-time supporter myself.)
 
My former employer, the Machine Intelligence Research Institute​, is running a new summer fundraiser. Rather than having a fixed target as they usually have, this time around they're doing a "stretch goal approach", seeking as much money as they can. They've already hit their first, $250,000 goal, and are looking to hopefully hit their $500,00 goal next.

Here are some of my reasons why donating to them would be a good idea:

* The recent "Research Priorities for Robust and Beneficial Artificial Intelligence" open letter, signed by many of the world's top AI experts in both industry and academia, stated: 

> Because of the great potential of AI, it is important to research how to reap its benefits while avoiding potential pitfalls. The progress in AI research makes it timely to focus research not only on making AI more capable, but also on maximizing the societal benefit of AI. [...] We recommend expanded research aimed at ensuring that increasingly capable AI systems are robust and beneficial: our AI systems must do what we want them to do.

There is now increasing attention on the topic of possible risks from AI. And as MIRI's Nate Soares​ states in his article "Why Now Matters", this makes it an exceptionally valuable time to donate to MIRI:

> There’s an idea picking up traction in the field of AI: instead of focusing only on increasing the capabilities of intelligent systems, it is important to also ensure that we know how to build beneficial intelligent systems. Support is growing for a new paradigm within AI that seriously considers the long-term effects of research programs, rather than just the immediate effects. Years down the line, these ideas may seem obvious, and the AI community’s response to these challenges may be in full swing. Right now, however, there is relatively little consensus on how to approach these issues — which leaves room for researchers today to help determine the field’s future direction.

> People at MIRI have been thinking about these problems for a long time, and that puts us in an unusually good position to influence the field of AI and ensure that some of the growing concern is directed towards long-term issues in addition to shorter-term ones. We can, for example, help avert a scenario where all the attention and interest generated by Musk, Bostrom, and others gets channeled into short-term projects (e.g., making drones and driverless cars safer) without any consideration for long-term risks that are less well-understood.

> It’s likely that MIRI will scale up substantially at some point; but if that process begins in 2018 rather than 2015, it is plausible that we will have already missed out on a number of big opportunities.

* In the last few years, MIRI has produced a number of novel papers, and been increasingly successful at getting mainstream academics interested in their work. The research priorities document attached to the previously mentioned open letter directly cited a number of MIRI's papers, including their recent research agenda. MIRI's representatives were also present at the invite-only "The Future of AI: Opportunities and Challenges" conference in Puerto Rico, where the open letter was drafted, and which collected together the top names of AI research.

Before the open letter and the conference, famous and influential academics who had cited, collaborated with, or favorably mentioned MIRI or their work already included the philosopher David Chalmers, the mathematician John Baez, and the co-author of the world's most used AI textbook, Stuart Russell.

In summary, it can be said that MIRI is currently strongly connected to the elite names in the field of AI research, as well as more or less endorsed by many of them.

* My past and current involvement with MIRI gives me some extent of insider access to information that convinces me they are working in an effective and rational manner, constantly refining their approaches based on new evidence. I've also put my money where my mouth is, making regular donations to them for a long time.

Links related to them and their fundraiser:

- Main fundraiser page: https://intelligence.org/2015/07/17/miris-2015-summer-fundraiser/
- Why now matters: https://intelligence.org/2015/07/20/why-now-matters/
- MIRI's approach: https://intelligence.org/2015/07/27/miris-approach/
- Fundraising targets #1 and #2 (#1 has already been reached): https://intelligence.org/2015/07/18/targets-1-and-2-growing-miri/
- Fundraising target #3: https://intelligence.org/2015/08/07/target-3-taking-it-to-the-next-level/
- Accomplishments in 2014: https://intelligence.org/2015/03/22/2014-review/
This last year has been pretty astounding. Since its release twelve months ago, Nick Bostrom’s book Superintelligence has raised awareness about the challenge that MIRI exists to address: long-term risks posed by smarter-than-human artificially intelligent systems. Academic and industry leaders echoed these concerns in an open letter advocating “research aimed at ensuring that increasingly capable... Read more »
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Always a good sign of reasonable legislation when the government steps in and goes "Yeah, that's illegal, but, well, nobody is really getting into trouble for it."
The High Court recently overturned private copying exceptions introduced last year by the UK Government, once again outlawing the habits of millions of citizens. The Intellectual Property Office today explains that ripping a CD in iTunes is no longer permitted, and neither is backing up your computer if it contains copyrighted content.
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AFAIK it's illegal everywhere. But who cares? It's an iThing! It'll still be a hit!
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> So drop your obligations. Don't try to help the world because you "should." Don't force yourself because you ought to. Just do what you want to do.

> And then, once you are freed of them, if you ever realize that serving only yourself has a hollowness to it; or if you ever realize that part of what you care about is your fellow humans, the welfare of sentient creatures, or our future; or if you ever learn to see the darkness in this world and discover that you really deeply need the world to be different than it is; if you ever defy the natural order, and find something on this pale blue dot worth fighting for, worth defending, worth carrying with us to the stars:

> then know that there are those of us who fight,

> and that we'd be honored to have you at our side.
I count myself among the effective altruists. (In fact, I'm at an effective altruism conference at the time of posting.) The effective altruism movement is about figuring out how to do good better, and there are a number of different...
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    System Administrator, 2004 - present
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A lazy bastard of an infosoc activist
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    Computer Science, 1996 - 2008
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