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Nicolas Dufour
Works at Rivet Logic
Lived in Paris, France
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Nicolas Dufour

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Apple, official producer of overpriced useless devices ;)
 
The Apple Watch costs less than $84 to make

:)
That's less than a quarter of its retail price.
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Tempting to play with it!
 
New Kid in Town: Albatross Proof Assistant

"For those of you who know Coq you might enjoy the capabilities of the proof engine and enjoy the fact that there is no extra proof language and all proofs are expressed by pure statements in predicate logic. Proof automation is done by predicate calculus as well and no by an integrated language like Ltac. Therefore the language is easier to learn than Coq, because every programmer has a well developed intuition about logic."

http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/node/5144

http://albatross-lang.sourceforge.net/
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A simple rule for ensuring at least k in big data streaming sampling. 
tl;dr When doing streaming sampling without replacement of a finite data set of known size $latex N$ in Pig, you'd do for some number $latex p$ between 0 and 1. If you need at least $latex k$ sampl...
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Yep, think so too. Next step is printing your own chip.
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Good to know :)
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The theory that an asteroid impact killed off the dinosaurs 66 million years ago is well accepted, but one puzzle is why another global catastrophe -- the huge, million-year eruption of the Deccan Traps flood basalts in India -- occurred at the same time. Geologists now argue this is not a coincidence. The impact probably rang Earth like a bell, reigniting an underground magma plume and generating the largest lava flows on Earth.
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Pretty amazing :)
 
Saturn's rings are fed by geysers that spew from 1 of its moons, Enceladus. New understanding: http://www.ciclops.org/view.php?id=8016&js=1
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Always cool to see that the makibox community is still active.
 
Just got a Makibox a6-lt and i'm having lots of problems getting the kit to extrude.  Eventually got this out (via Repetier), which looks pretty decent considering i was pushing the filament through by hand (the top is a horrid horrid mess, as you'd expect). 
Just need to figure out why the Zen drive is feeding so slowly, the hotend blocks quickly when it's not fed much filement by the zen drive (or by hand).
I suspect i'll have more luck with blockages once my e3d v6 lite arrives, but there still won't be enough filament being drawn through
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Somethings are not as they appear in the Universe.  In an intriguing and extraordinary discovery astro-archeologists have found a group of Red Giant Stars that have their chemical clocks "frozen in time".  If confirmed this outstanding discovery could revolutionize our understanding into the life-cycle and evolution of Stars and indeed our own Galaxy

"An international team of astrophysicists, led by Cristina Chiappini from the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam, has discovered a group of red giant stars for which the 'chemical clock' does not work: according to their chemical signature, these stars should be old. Instead, they appear to be young when their ages are inferred using asteroseismology. Their existence cannot be explained by standard chemical evolution models of the Milky Way, suggesting that the chemical enrichment history of the Galactic disc is more complex than originally assumed."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-04-stars-chemical-clock.html#jCp

The study: Young [ α /Fe]-enhanced stars discovered by CoRoT and APOGEE: What is their origin?, Chiappini et al. 2015, A&A, 576, L12. http://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201525865

Image: Artist impression of red giant stars in the Milky Way. Credit: AIP/ J. Fohlmeiste
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And one more :)
Brian Koberlein originally shared to Our Universe:
 
Hit Me With Your Best Shot

One of the striking features of Earth (besides the living things upon it) is that it possesses a relatively large moon. While our Moon is not the largest in the solar system, it is large for such a small planet. The mass of the Moon is more than 1% that of Earth, compared to Jupiter’s largest moon Ganymede, which is just 0.008% of Jupiter’s mass. The origin of our large moon has been a matter of some debate.

The most popular model is the collision model. In this model, the young proto-Earth collided with a Mars-sized planetoid sometimes named Theia. Part of the mass of Theia was captured to become Earth, and the remains formed a debris ring around Earth, much of which coalesced to form the Moon. This model has a lot going for it. For example, the Moon has a density about 60% that of Earth, which is exactly what is predicted by the collision model, where the lighter outer layers of Theia and proto-Earth are scattered to the debris disk, while the heavy core of proto-Earth remains.

The main downside of this model is the fact that the Earth and Moon have a very similar chemical composition. The only way to explain that fact with the collision model is to assume that Theia and Earth had a very similar composition, which would seem unlikely. Now new research published in Nature has found that similarities between colliding bodies aren’t as unlikely as we thought.

The team ran computer simulations of young solar systems, and looked at how chemically similar large bodies were with their last major impactors. What they found was that 20% – 40% of the time they were similar enough to account for the Earth-Moon compositions. So it’s not so unusual that the Earth and Moon are chemically similar.

There’s only one other body in the solar system with such a relatively large moon as ours, and that’s Pluto’s moon Charon. Charon’s mass is 12% that of Pluto. Charon is also thought to be the result of a collision, so when New Horizons makes its flyby of the planet in July, we find even more clues about planet-shattering collisions.

Paper: Alessandra Mastrobuono-Battisti, et al. A primordial origin for the compositional similarity between the Earth and the Moon. Nature 520, 212–215 (2015)
New research further supports the theory that the Moon was formed when Earth was struck by a Mars-sized body.
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Software Architect with a foot in geophysics and another for weird physics theories.
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  • Rivet Logic
    Software Architect, 2010 - present
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