Profile

Cover photo
R. J. Zimmerman
Works at Chiaro
Attended California State University, Fullerton
246 followers|96,087 views
AboutPostsReviews

Stream

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
two apple observations from WWDC:
1. I can't see why Swift was made open source, but I think it's great to program is Swift and now be able to use this on embedded Linux (maybe--we'll need a compiler...)
2. Apple Music seems pretty un-apple like. They've solved no problem. It's a confusing mess. I don't think people want a global radio station. I can't see how they're doing anything better than competitors (except maybe family pricing) and putting artists social media contributions behind a subscription fee is obviously a non-starter. 
1
Angelique Ang's profile photo
 
hallo zimmerman :) know nothing about post. just saying howzit. +R. J. Zimmerman​
 ·  Translate
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
UK Prime Minister David Cameron recently said “In our country [the United Kingdom], do we want to allow a means of communication between people which, even in extremis with a signed warrant from the Home Secretary, that we cannot read? My answer to that question is no we must not.”

There is a fundamental difference between the UK and the US. In the UK cameras are everywhere and people like them because it makes them safer. Guns are banned, and David Cameron is continuing that theme in this quote about things like Apple’s FaceTime and iMessage systems which are encrypted.

A UK citizen recently said: if I have nothing to hide, this system is better.

The U.S. response typically goes something like ‘you have nothing to hide from today’s (benevolent) government. What if you had something to hide from a future government who has begun abusing that power and with whom you disagree.

If privacy and freedom increase risks and danger, is it worth it? Is it a good thing to live in a benevolent police state if it’s safer, crime is reduced, and the majority of people’s freedoms aren’t limited?
1
R. J. Zimmerman's profile photoKen Johnson's profile photo
108 comments
 
+Richard Lucas

"Well, once again, the question arises how much time and money were spent on surveillance of this kid?  In the end, you had grown-ass men and women, pouring taxpayer dollars into developing a case against a kid who really needed some outreach."

Great thought. I'm right there with you so far.

"No one seemed particularly interested in the human being who was used as a pawn in this systemic pageantry of alienated idiocy."

Used as a pawn? I suspect he was just being watched, no?

"Once again, there were no Good Guys among the Good Guys, who might've stood up and said, "What the fuck's the matter with you? He's a kid, and in the grips of a psychological thing that grips people, and if we put in half the effort we put making him a Bad Guy into reaching out and making him a Good Guy, then America wins." The terrorists lose. Humanity wins."

Now this implies that they worked to make him bad. Is there evidence to support that?

"and since we can take that as an indicator of where their interest lie, then we can also assume they cannot be trusted with..."

You seem to be claiming that the Man is actively manufacturing terrorists, and extending that to "assume they cannot be trusted". I'm more inclined to believe the average anti-terror agent works in hope of fulfilling the universal plea that we all cry after moments like the Tim McVeigh bombing, "why can't they stop these people on time?". It is highly possible that McVeigh could have benefitted from caring intervention if it had come soon enough. But at some point we have to admit that we lack the resources to monitor everyone that way. We need an agency to develop cases against those with bad intentions, and their skills are different than those of a social worker. The suspects friends and family would more likely have been in an intervention position. The cops need to be cops.

Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
In case any one cares, I think apple's finally releasing an Aperture replacement. I think the video they just showed was an example.... we'll see in a moment if you watch their release video.
1
R. J. Zimmerman's profile photo
 
eh, too bad...not yet.
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Finally someone explains why Apple and others didn't (and likely won't) use sapphire on phone screens any time soon. 

It had been annoying me that everyone in the media assume that scratch resistance (which sapphire definitely has) would also mean shatter resistance (which, in most formulations, it definitely does not have).

Read more:
http://time.com/3377972/why-apple-didnt-use-sapphire-iphone-screens/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+timeblogs%2Fnerd_world+%28TIME%3A+Techland%29
1
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
see that "external camera ring"

My prediction: it's ferro magnetic enabling the mounting of external lenses for the iPhone camera. Apple could offer some of their own, or promote this as a feature for mobile phone photographers. Not a terrible idea.....
1
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Who needs an iWatch?

As an Apple investor, I'm happy that the company practically prints money, but I still long for them to produce game-changing products and market solutions. 

I don't think an iWatch really is such an exciting device. Unless they do more. Here's one idea what that could be:
http://www.eyeon-technology.com/?p=75 
One of Steve Job's greater accomplishments wasn't design or marketing, it was negotiating with an intransigent music industry and convincing them to let the iTunes Music store sell music one song at a time. At that time, Apple was able to convince them that well designed products and an ...
1
Steven Zimmerman's profile photoR. J. Zimmerman's profile photo
2 comments
 
This article of mine is old, before it was released at all, and I've since changed my mind quite a bit. I still have some serious reservations about it.

I still am not getting one, but I'm not a very typical customer for them anyway (even if I do have several Apple products).
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Oh look, I was in Escalante too!
https://flic.kr/p/nvPZ4L
Just a short stroll from Peek-a-boo, Spooky is bumpier, tighter, and loads of fun. These two short canyons offer just enough taste of canyoneering to easily tempt you for more, or scare you off entirely. Both are remarkably fun and beautiful. Get there early for the best light (I didn't!). Walk a few steps away and check out Peek-a-boo as well: flic.kr/p/nxS6HH
3
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Novus Light highlighted the brand new 3D sensor from Chiaro. (that's me, waving!)
1
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
App idea: a browser plug-in that blocks headlines of the "top n things" style. There, free, make that, and you might make millions, or at least millions happy.
12.09.14. It's not just for Buzzfeed any more (but it should be). Posted in 2¢ at 9:11 by RjZ. How could you have avoided this trend? The headlines based on “n things that x” popularized by Buzzfeed. I received this e-mail blast from LinkedIn, with the subject line “[My Name], see the top 14 ...
1
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Got up in the middle of the night only to have clouds slowly blot out the lunar eclipse. 

Here's what I got:
Clouds ruined my eclipse, but it was worth a shot. Here seen overlooking Eldorado Canyon south of Boulder, Colorado. This is a composite of images taken every three minutes (save for the last one with the foreground take a bit later).
3
Andreas Geisler's profile photoR. J. Zimmerman's profile photo
2 comments
 
why thank you!
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
Watching cycling may be the lowest commitment from a fan possible.

Here the lead group passes in front of the Boulder, Colorado's Flatirons. The peleton passed by, about as quickly, moments later. And that's it. You've seen it, go back to what you were doing before.

By the way, Jens Voigt is in that group, enjoying a tremendous performance for his last professional race. Congrats Tejay!
#jensvoigt   #procyclingchallenge   #tejayvangarderen   #bouldercolorado  
1
Add a comment...

R. J. Zimmerman

Shared publicly  - 
 
The pic isn't so interesting until you check out the few pixels near the bottom that represent people. Then you realize just how big these rocks are: https://flic.kr/p/nfeY67
This picture is only fun if you take a moment to check out the tiny people walking at the bottom of the wash, for scale. These walls are nearly 600 ft (183 m) tall and this isn't even the narrowest part of the gorge.
2
Add a comment...
Work
Occupation
Business Development and Technical Marketing
Employment
  • Chiaro
    Director of Business Development, 2012 - present
  • Micron Technology
    Bus Dev, Microdisplays, Photonics, 2012
  • Zolo Technologies
    European Product Manager
  • Melles Griot
    Sales and Marketing Manager
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Education
  • California State University, Fullerton
    Physics
Links
Other profiles
Contributor to
I was happy with the information I found got at HeliPort hobbies and with the time they took with me. I wound up walking out with a new 1SQ nano qaud copter and, indeed, just as promised, it looks like I can really fly the thing!
Quality: GoodAppeal: GoodService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Mark and his team are courteous and responsible. It's very easy to work with them and we are satisfied with the results!
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
2 reviews
Map
Map
Map