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DiverTrek
79 followers -
A diver's adventure travel photoblog.
A diver's adventure travel photoblog.

79 followers
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I'm honoured to have one of my shark photos chosen for Wetpixel's Rob Stewart Memorial Shark Wall. As Wetpixel so eloquently states: "This feature attempts to honor Rob’s memory with shark imagery submitted by many photographers from around the world. What unites us all is a common concern for sharks’ plight, and a desire to continue Rob’s lifelong quest to show them to the world as sentient and intelligent animals that do not represent any real form of threat to humans. We hope that this message is borne out by our imagery."
http://wetpixel.com/full_frame/rob-stewart-a-tribute

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White Mouth Moray eel. You can see in this photo how its white spots help it to blend in with the background corals.
Photographed in Kona, Hawaii, 60 mm macro lens, f/16, 1/250s.
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I'm having problems posting to a community (that I successfully posted to two weeks ago) . When I set the community preferences to "top post" it disappears completely. I can't see it even going back as far as two months (and way past my previous post). Yet when I set the community preferences to " most recent" it then appears.
The community does not hold for review (as the moderator told me).
Thanks for your time.

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Exploring a wall filled with Giant Plumose Anenomes in British Columbia. Here my dive buddy is helping to backlight a large Lion's Mane Jellyfish, about 2 feet across, that we came across. Note the large number of juvenille Rockfish. No one that I talked could remember such an "explosion" in numbers as this in decades. No one knows the exact reason-increased temperatures? or food supply?
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A Red Flabellina. The red cores that you see in the frilly cerata are actually extensions of their digestive system. The increased surface area increases the efficiency of digestion.
#underwaterphotography #macrophotography
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Hi there,
For some reason I have not been able to post to my usual communities. Any post gets automatically shuffled over to my profile page (even though it still contains the community tag). I have interacted with others, and +1 others posts. I post only about once a week, and share infrequently.
I posted to a third community, and again, it got shuffled over to my profile. My post has received several +1's from others in that group (via notifications), but yet my post is not visible to me in that group, and is not registering the +1's on my profile page.
Thanks for any help.

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World's Best Wreck Dives
We've updated the list of ten best shipwreck dives on the planet, as voted for by our readers. How many have you dived? All the wrecks are in warm water: the one cold water representative (at Scotland's Scapa Flow) has dropped out of the latest update of list. Is this just a reflection of more people diving in warm water, or are the tropical dives really the best?
Full list is at http://www.scubatravel.co.uk/best-wreck-dives.html

The top ten
1. The Yongala, Australia
2. Thistlegorm, Egyptian Red Sea
3. USAT Liberty, Bali, Indonesia
4. President Coolidge, Vanuatu
5. Fujikawa Maru, Truk Lagoon (Chuuk Lagoon)
6. San Francisco Maru, Truk Lagoon, Micronesia
7. The Zenobia, Cyprus
8. Hilma Hooker, Bonaire
9. HMS Hermes, Sri Lanka
10. C-53 Felipe Xicotenantl, Cozumel

Claiming the title of the best wreck dive in the world, is the Yongala. Full of life you may see manta rays, sea snakes, octopuses, turtles, bull sharks, tiger sharks, clouds of fish and beautiful coral.

The Yongala sank off the coast of Queensland during a cyclone in 1911, killing 122 people, a racehorse called Moonshine and a red Lincolnshire bull. She had no telegraph facilities and so could not be warned of the weather ahead. In 1981 the Yongala was given official protection under the Historic Shipwrecks Act: divers are not allowed into the wreck. The ship is 90 km southeast of Townsville, 10 km away from Cape Bowling Green. 109 meters long, the bow points north and the ship lists to starboard.

Second on the list, the Thistlegorm, was a British vessel which was attacked from the air and sunk in 1941 whilst carrying a cargo of war supplies: rifles, motor bikes, train carriages, trucks. A big wreck - 131 metres long - you'll want to do this more than once to explore fully. Currents can be strong, and in different directions at the surface and at the wreck.

Third is currently The Liberty in Bali. She lies on a black sand slope, almost parallel to the beach and is only 30 m offshore. Between 9 and 30 m of water, she is totally encrusted in fabulously coloured anemones, gorgonians and corals. The wreck is 120 m long and is pretty broken up so you can't enter it, but you can still see the guns, toilets, boilers, anchor chain and such like. There is some confusion as to the history of the Liberty. Many people refer it as the Liberty Glo, but this is a different ship which sank off the coast of Holland. The difficulties probably arise as the ship had several designations during her life. The US Navy Museums site, tells us that she was originally the USS Liberty (1918), then the SS Liberty and finally the USAT

Read more at http://www.scubatravel.co.uk/best-wreck-dives.html
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2016-12-16
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4 days of diving at the Mexican Cenotes and I come back amazed on how amazing these little holes in the earth are as a diving destination.
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12/12/16
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