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Brian Kelley
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By the way, in my opinion, the success of this approach depends entirely on the teacher's knowing the learners. McCann repeats that point throughout the text and bears repeating here.

Side bar: I have been quote some excerpts from Transforming Talk into Text on Twitter. I have been using the hashtag #TalkText in the hopes of generating some other comments and thinking from outside our group. If you use Twitter, feel free to scroll that hashtag, comment, add, retweet, etc. I have engaged in some interesting/challenging professional discussions on Twitter and have even connected with educators globally beyond our initial Twitter dialogues.

The thread of inquiry-based conversations and writing are resonating with me. I appreciate McCann's repeated referencing the research of Arthur Appleby as I have explored his 2013 work for some of my own writing. Appelby makes the case that an incongruent amount of writing in schools is transactional (teacher/reward-driven). Since the early 80s, most students' experiences with writing are transactions and continue to be: DBQs, TDAs, et al. What Appleby calls for is more expressive writing (expressive meaning thinking). The case made in this text for more inquiry-based experiences (and the examples) are very helpful.

This text is making me reconsider how one might typically teach argument. While the templates make for solid concrete moves for all writers (not just adolescents and teenagers), I am most interested in the explicit connections to the Six Traits.

In other words, academic writing (ie argument) does not have to feel like another new set of constructs to follow. Good writing is good writing. The moves in TSIS can easily be plugged into organization/transitions...sentence fluency...word choice...not to mention ideas. Think of the message Graff and Birkenstein deliver to us to teach listening--gather ideas (something to say) from listening to others. Consider, when reading a text, what the writer may have been listening to generate his/her idea.

I can see using some of these templates as prompts at the start of a class. For example, I can write the following prompt on the board-- "It has become common today to dismiss..." (23) --and treat it just as an idea starter. We can return to it down the road as a move to make when writing an argument. There are lots of useful bits and pieces in this book!

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Where do social media platforms, micro-blogging, and blogging fit into the professional development of young teachers in education programs? Are assumptions made that because teenagers and twenty-somethings may have a handle of social media in their personal lives that they understand its potential value in their professional lives?
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If I don't return the doc, but it is scored, will the student see the score? Or will they see it only when it is returned?
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Is there a way, after multiple assignments, to see a list of Student As assignments? (instead of going into each assignment separately)

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Made an education meme with the message and theme, inspired by Don Graves, of my classroom this year.
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So often during summers, I laid on the floor and got lost in album covers.
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Driven mad by the ice cream truck song and the Fudgie-Wudgie man's lyrical chants humping heavy chests of ice cream across the sand...these are some of my memories of summer and ice cream.
We All Scream for Ice Cream
We All Scream for Ice Cream
walkthewalkblog.blogspot.com
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