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ali Dere
Works at sa health
Attends University of Northampton
Lived in uk
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ali Dere

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Superheros
Superheroes doing superhero stuff don’t impress me; ordinary folks doing extra ordinary deeds do…and How can I not be proud? #superheroes  
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"islamic state"
A word or a few on ISIS-

In a land ravaged in lawlessness, archaic insidious tribal rivalry and bubbling with ancient sectarian loathing; it is expected then and immensely reasonable/desirable ‘in principle’ to actively intervene in order to change the condition of the people afflicted by this scourge. Hence, ISIS in principle was on the right path.

However, in practice, evil only begets evil, and Islamicaly at least, a holy cause requires a holy effort. Killing children, women and innocent non combatants’ ordinary citizens is wholly unholy. Secondly, IF IT WERE, given all the principle of an Islamic state has been established, the state’s protection of all its citizens’ rights becomes an ‘absolute obligation’ regardless of their creed and religious affiliation. And vilifying other faiths for that matter is no ways of an Islamic state. Therefore, ISIS’s so called ‘Islamic state’ is a polar opposite with no shred of an Islamic etiquette…hence; ‘un-Islamic state’.

Word of caution though’, let’s not forget the original sin, the invasion of Iraq in 2003 which ultimately created this behemoth that is changing the geopolitical landscape raising from the resulting absence of state structure. #islamicstate  
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Why are there no Muslim philosophers?



Are Muslim academics playing the role of ‘house Muslims’?
http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/06/muslim-philosophers-2014610135114713259.html#comment-1432024138  
This question reminds me of research stats that were conducted back in one region of Kenya where majority of the inhabitants were Muslims with less western education. The first researcher set to find the level of literacy in the region and after a long data gathering process, come to a conclusion that 97% of the population were illiterate. Few yrs later, another researcher found to contradict the former, and found actually almost 99% of the inhabitants were literate. The difference been, the former considered western education to be a defining characteristic of literacy, and the later considered the ability to read and write as defining factor; hence, the former misunderstood the parameters and the definitions, hence, did not recognise almost everyone can read and write Qur’anic texts and indeed even understand the Arabic text to some extent. Hence, the flaw.
The same as this question, if you define a philosopher within the parameters of western prescriptions, then indeed, we might find a few Muslim philosophers, however, given the content of the Qur’anic metaphorical look at the life itself and  the need to practice this view in real life for all Muslims, it makes most of Muslims philosophers more than any other population or denomination; if we don’t strictly consider philosophers only those who fit precisely to the western definition of philosoph. #MUSLIMPHILOSOPHERS  
Are Muslim academics playing the role of 'house Muslims'?
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A modern day male misogyny: Not an Arab males’ monopoly
A modern day male misogyny: Not an Arab males’ monopoly
First, let me declare my interest. I am a man, originally of a country part of the Arab league (thought I do describe myself not as an Arab but a Somali), I am a Muslim and can identify with the state of affairs Mona has described. As an individual raised and a product of this social environment, where the alleged misconducts have been taking place, I feel I have a right to a say too. However, obviously some bias might creep-in within my understanding of the issues raised but I assure you not an intended or deliberate act of subjugating the serious issues at hand. That said, Mona’s passion, enthusiasm, and the will to change for better the status quo of the subjugated so called Arab women is something to be admired. It is indeed a matter of fact the state of Arab or African women at times is in dire state of male dominance. It’s also in Mona’s God given right and an absolute religious obligation to voice her outrage and anger on the despicable state of those women. Thought to be clear, this description may not apply to the majority of the Arab or African women for that matter. Never the less, it exists and that doesn’t warrant a lesser attention or outrage than if it were to apply to the majority.
However, a few point of contention that I would like to point, not as a misogynistic male opposition-st, but out of love for her erup-tious genuine active participation in correcting an erroneous social trajectory in a community she so loves.  Firstly, there is an absolute need to separate a religious and a traditional causal. It is my belief that this two are almost definitely always the victim of each other, one more so than the other especially when it comes to the matters of Muslim women hailing from different cultural background. This confusion masks important issues facing women; from the suffocating tribal/traditional rules of Taliban of ‘no school for girls’ to the Somalis barbaric acts of female genital mutilation to the perverted actions of so called ‘honor killings’.  There are two common denominators in all of these confusioninst-animalistic acts. Firstly, it is completely categorically –unjustifiably-hellish and an absolute Haram acts committed against a human being which will warrant a severe punishment. Secondly, often these perverted cruelties are carried out under the banner of ‘religious duties’, and Islamic religion for that matter.
Now, what Mona did not categorically decant especially to the greater public is the role played by the two in these horrific acts (tradition and religion). This has created unhealthy defensive atmosphere that leads to the discussion of Nikhab and a horrific acts such as the deprivation of education and FGM in the same breath. This could be due to (and I could be wrong here) Mona’s personal limited knowledge in Islam which could have led her to believe this two tradition play equal part in the status-quo. As an above average educated (mostly self educated) Islamic student, I have never seen a speck of justification for the misogynistic attitude of men described in your article in the teachings of Islam. Rather, Islam is a teaching that humbles a man to kiss his mother’s feet as a condition for his salvation (paradise). Therefore, whoever truly practices Islam can only be a true plain feminist, who upholds women’s rights above his own and never a misogynist maverick.
A Muslim will never advocate for a woman to not get educated when clearly education is a matter of an absolute (not a choice) in both genders. The prophets says for both genders ‘Go in quest of knowledge even unto China-roughly translate. We can certainly be flexible in how this education is facilitated which is where less informed critics of Islam jump into the band-wagon whenever they hear of gender separation at school. Western world have different laws affecting women differently than men all the time! For example ‘a women cannot take their tops off in a celebration for her team scoring or in scoring herself, otherwise she will be breaking the law and will be arrested on a public nudity order act, but you cannot say the same for males. Western world have segregated lavatories but it will be nonsensical if feminist argued this was discriminatory! So why up in arms when western feminist hear Muslim women have to pray separately? Don’t you respect the privacy of the same women you claim to fight for? Let’s get issues into perspective here, we are not teaching each other absolute morals, because none of us can claim that, all morals are subjective and contextual-and almost certainly western world would probably hold the tail when it comes to the moral high ground queue.
Of course there are those who would shout till the cows come home and will always have a contentious view on others, a simple fact is, it will be inconsiderate of them to expect all things to conform to their tune-and that sadly will never happen-even in a perfect world. However, this is beside the point, going back to the issue, the separation of this two social institutions (religion and tradition) is paramount for this debate to have a productive end. After all, that is the goal of the debate-clear rules of engagement. The second litigious issue here is the direction of the change you are advocating for. It is all well to cry for to tidal change, and the attitudes of Arab men maybe needs to change but not necessary to the western latitude, and maybe towards the Islamic teaching which might have a better luck and far reaching consequences than seeming to peddle a western connotation of freedom from male misogyny.  Personally, I think there has never lived a male misogynistic society than the present day western world. Where the highest circulated printed press involves a new commodity (women) disguised as ‘successful models’. There is almost not commercial product sold or advertised without these accessories. You pop-in to a car show and there you have it, a woman scantily dressed aimlessly standing next to a Ferrari! What she doing there? There reason a human would stand next to a commodity to be sold I personally fail to comprehend but they say its sells the car.
In my healthcare professional, I am privileged to work with among the most future potential age group of the western society (young adolescent) who had the misfortune to suffer mental illness. I wish Mona or the members of the public (male or female, Arab or non Arab) had the privilege to visit one of their local mental health units, then maybe they will better understand the ‘real’ human cost of ‘real’ misogynistic society. The number of teenage girls slashing their wrist and faces, self starvation (anorexia, bulimia, etc) just because they think they are not ‘good looking enough’ to the standards of the women on the press is quite frankly astonishingly scandalous. I am not implying all mental health or all this cases are as a result of the portrayal of women on media but only a plain foolish will ignore their influence in these young people. When you create a society where women are put on the pedestal  purely on their appearance, then to point a finger on another society where women can have dignity and acceptance through speech is frankly a hypocrisy of the highest order.
And maybe we ought to excuse Mona for not viewing this as a problem due to her inexperience working with the product of western portrait of women. However, if the debate is on how or the effect of man’s view of women to the wider society, then maybe she ought to understand the depth of what she is advocating for the Arab men. Just because you live in a world where you are free to scantly dress (am not implying a problem here) doesn’t mean you are not implicitly driven to please a misogynistic male society. Otherwise who are you on display for? On the other hand, if Mona is respecting the right of a woman to be naked in public (which is illegal in most of the so called civilized nations), then surely the same right should be reserved for those who want to cover fully.
Lastly, I would like to challenge Mona to produce one single law or  provision in Islam which if implemented would not fundamentally improve the condition of women, socially, economically and politically. Just one. Hence, the issue here is not Islam, and its very well for those who have above average understanding of Islamic teachings and can differentiate your mix-up of religion and culture. However, for a non Muslims or even less informed Muslims who are already confused and can barely differentiate Arabs from Muslims, it is these very people you might want to educate on your course. But this piece does no one favor to anyone at all. It creates and fuels farther miss informed stereotypical misunderstanding that fans the already Islama-phobic western population with little knowledge of anything.
As for that part of traditional Arab culture that is misogynistic, I totally agree, but is not a traditional that is monopolized by Arab culture only. Just as I mentioned, western male misogyny is rife with instances where woman are pure commodity. Where the phrase ‘you might as well use your body-get naked- while you can’ can be a common advice to young female by their parents, nothing short of maximizing return on a new product or technology that will quickly lose its market share as it becomes yesterday inventions. A product with an expiry date, so to speak. The selling of girls to rich Saudis is first of all rare, fundamentally wrong even in the eyes of the majority of Arab men, and is mainly influenced by economical misfortunes; and far from been fundamentally Arab men’s phenomenon collectively socially endorsed. That is where again the article fails to consider issues in context (economical, and social-political) of the wider social drivers.
Overall, the issue here is, those who are trying to exert changes (silently) are the really champions who will suffer the repercussions of these sweeping generalization and blurring the lines for those who were already gazing at the mist of Islam with suspicion and prejudicial eyes. This approach will create more conflict and confusion that tire down the delicate walls built over many years to bridge the world communities (including males and females). There is one major thing we have learned from this article and maybe a lesson for us all, even the best intentions can creates the worst out-come if execution is lousy. Now, the way forward is to regain the reins of these run-away horse and steer into a more informed, less volatile path, and I hope Mona doesn’t see this is a harsh criticism, but a genuine fine tuning effort to the clarify this important piece. #arabmalemasogny  
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ali Dere

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[O]nce again, we are confronted with the belief among some that bigger nations can bully smaller ones to get their way — that recycled maxim that might somehow makes right.”

— President Barack Obama—-nice enough guy, but his speech of ZERO acknowledgment of history on the situation in Ukraine…
Democracy is not a monopoly to a ‘specific’ community, u would have learned that lesson surely at some point in your long legal career,
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Ottoman’s political tool legacy
Ottoman’s legacy might need more than one narrator, but sultan’s, kings and princess are no measure for any social acronym, preaching on Turkeys state of political metamorphosis based on their past sultan’s Cv’s is like to say any average Briton has the quality financial slumber as the Royal family…think of how that sounds, preposterous!!. #ottaman  
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ali Dere

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OBE Nighthood
Knighthoods and OBE! OBEs! Indorsing and publically acknowledging those with track of an exemplary contribution to the socially is a constructive thing to do, however, considering the strings of unpleasant stench in the air emanating from alleged acts of OBE holders, from despicable Jimmy (OBE), Rolf Haris  (CBE) to the latest tax-avoidance circus by the ‘Take That’ frontman (Gary Barlow, OBE), maybe is time to start considering this awards well after the death of the individuals, after all, it’s never over till it’s over. #nighhood
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Robin Williams
A legendary human: Robin

Death: the ONLY sure thing in life….teaches nothing to the afflicted, but abundance of lesson for the living.

In this case; don’t envy others life except be it for eternal peace and time and time again, we learn material worldly possession/fame is never a guarantor of a happy life…

But do we take heed? Never! Ever! #robinwilliams  
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I am a man marveled in the ideological ‘emancipation’ of marketplace with ‘Unlimited freedom’ but saddened in the fiction of it all… in reality, a mirage… consider this….
 
“In the United States, wealth is highly concentrated in a relatively few hands. As of 2010, the top 1% of households owned 35.4% of all privately held wealth, and the next 19% had 53.5%, which means that just 20% of the people owned a remarkable 89%, leaving only 11% of the wealth for the bottom 80% (wage and salary workers).”
Edward Nathan Wolf:  Department of economics: New York University
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Former villain as an expert!?  Why do media always interview former extremists as an expert?

I certainly don agree to be once an inmate in a mental institution doesn’t make you a mental health expert, n even more unthinkable is the idea of former inmate taking over the running of the affairs of the asylum, for almost certainly will lead to suicide”, #Thequilliamfoundation
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The Crimean Peninsula; a cremated crime scene
The Crimean Peninsula; a cremated crime scene
In the world of rhetorical hypocrisy, sometimes the only time ‘the bullied’ get an opportunity to afford a cautious smile is when two ‘natural bullies’ have a stand-off. You would think a right action is first of all, always right, regardless of time, and a cause of action to correct the same wrong would always be the same too. One thing you can be sure of and an inherently evil, is the nature of the bully’s self-interested divided allegiance. He has the ability to look away when the weak is tormented as longer as the torturer has stealthily slipped him some sweets or offered to do his homework. Even more interesting to watch, is the glorious moment when the bullies’ showcase their quality, ethics and standard of their character. Not that many would stand to listen given the choice but ignore at your own peril. Hence, a captive superficial audience is always guaranteed.  
The UN General Assembly can declare Crimea’s Moscow-backed referendum illegal if at all anyone is listening. Talk of starting a stone throwing game in glassed house, only to quickly realize the mistake when the game is already in full swing. Russia is not better a bully than its league mates (Europe and U.S.A), but sure they know how to tie their laces before they race. Surely, undermining the territorial integrity and sovereignty of another national is the greatest of all crimes in the so called democratic world today. However, surprisingly, if the bully is loud enough, then even hostile invasion of another country is not really a straight forward cause of action to guarantee at least a slap either on the face or wrist but a threat of that inevitably happening in the near future.
The supposedly powers of the world surely should be policing and fulfilling their self appointed, self interesting task of keeping the world safer. Surprisingly, the mandate changes if the justice to be administered interferes with their personal comfort (gas supply for winter). This explains why Europeans just cannot really mach their barking skills to their military might (non existence) as well as their economic independence. However, Americans surprisingly were in a better mood to push the sore spot further before they too realized their military capabilities are liked to that of a lame duck trekking in the desert.   
It is time we only talk as much as we can walk, realize Crimea is a done deal, the evidence is in the bag, so let the reconciliation begin, and the sooner the mourning can commence. The hard fact is, Europe and America can hardly lift a finger unless their life depends on it due to their military and economic quack mire.  Let’s move on and agree to disagree, and allow Russia to take the trophy home this time. After all, in battle you win some you lose some, and maybe the west need some hard lessons on how to be good at losing because the battle ahead is not much a guaranteed victory. #ukrainecrisis  
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No special day for my mum
Having a ‘special day’ for someone usually is enough to symbolize their importance, but NOT for a mum. Every day is a SPECIAL mothers’ day, and even THAT will never be enough an appreciation! So, to hell with corporate scum ‘mother’s day’ shenanigans, peddling their extended idiomatic commercial leech-like strategy to convince me to buy this and that! A product with inestimable love will tempt me, but don’t think is in stock yet. Let me know when you separate mothers love from material and in an abundant supply every single day of the year, till then, so long suckers! #mothersday  
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Have him in circles
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soni ghatt's profile photo
jeeyte afgooye's profile photo
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Assistant Psychologist
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  • sa health
    assistance clin psy, present
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talent is learning the skills effortlesley. psychology student and always will be, i think.
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  • University of Northampton
    psychology, present
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