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Kofi Amihere
21,914 followers -
Student / Tech Enthusiast
Student / Tech Enthusiast

21,914 followers
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Kofi's posts

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Khan Academy is now available for free on Android! 

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Can Universities teach us how to live?

This is exactly what +Alain de Botton​​​​​​​ and his team at the +The School of Life​​​​​​ have set out to do in their enthralling set of wonderfully animated videos on Philosophy, Sociology, Psychotherapy, Literature, Politics and Art. Practicing what he preaches, Alain dares to ask the big questions that will truly help us to live better lives.

In today's secular age where our accepted way of knowing the world (i.e. Science) has yet to produce answers to some of life's most important queries, The School of Life revives the answers to serious issues from its ivory tower and presents it to us in the most engaging way possible.

As educators find their way online and our formal educational system is slowly being disrupted, it is wonderful to find high quality content full of wisdom available instantly to millions worldwide. At its best +The School of Life​​​​​​ , this compelling cross between the simplicity and visual acuity of +TED Ed​​​​​​ and the sagacity of +Big Think​​​​​​, is able to ally lessons on Sartre, Matisse and Proust with videos on relationships, the work life balance and the dangers of being too defensive. The end result is nothing short of mesmerizing. The School of life has quickly become a reliable modern guide to existence if not at the very least a steady reminder that the role of a lifelong learner is never fully realized.


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Universal Understanding
by Ashley Mackenzie - artist + illustrator -
http://ashmackenzie.com/about
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Visualizing Meteorites

An animated time-lapse of all 1,045 meteorites that have been seen falling since 861 AD

Check it out: http://www.visualizing.org/full-screen/53518

A meteorite is a solid piece of debris from a body originating in outer space that survives the impact with the Earth's surface. The mass of a meteorite can range from few grams to several tonnes. When a body enters the atmosphere the body to heat up and emits light, thus forming a fireball, also known as a meteor or shooting/falling star.

Most meteorite falls are recovered on the basis of eye-witness accounts of the fireball or the impact of the object on the ground. Meteorites fall with virtually equal probability everywhere on the Earth, eye-witnessed meteorites tend to be concentrated in areas with high human population densities such as Europe, Japan, and northern India.

Source : Bolides by Carlo Zapponi (http://bolid.es/

For more Science Visualizations check out +Visualizing  : 
http://www.visualizing.org/explore#featured=1&topics=2956&sort=recent

#ScienceSunday   
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Hit a 95 mph baseball? Scientists pinpoint how we see it coming

How does San Francisco Giants slugger Pablo Sandoval swat a 95 mph fastball, or tennis icon Venus Williams see the oncoming ball, let alone return her sister Serena’s 120 mph serves? For the first time, vision scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have pinpointed how the brain tracks fast-moving objects.

The discovery advances our understanding of how humans predict the trajectory of moving objects when it can take one-tenth of a second for the brain to process what the eye sees.

Read more at:
http://www.psychology-world.com/2013/05/hit-95-mph-baseball-scientists-pinpoint.html

#ScienceEveryday  
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Why is 'x' the symbol for an unknown? In this short and funny talk, Terry Moore gives the surprising answer. 

#ScienceEveryday  

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Do No Harm: Why do some people want to cut off a perfectly healthy limb?

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Font Based on Sigmund Freud’s Handwriting Coming Courtesy of Successful Kickstarter Campaign http://goo.gl/FheOd +Open Culture 

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The Great Brain Experiment

Are you faster or more attentive than other people? Can you remember more or make better choices? Time to test your brain and find out!

Be part of a unique scientific experiment by playing games on your phone. Neuroscientists at University College London have 'gamified' their research, creating a quirky, fun app which turns neuroscience experiments into games. Each time you play you'll be contributing data to a huge scientific experiment, taking part in research that could previously only be conducted on small groups of volunteers in the lab. The Great Brain Experiment will look at memory, impulsivity, how we take risks, and how well the mind’s eye can see. It will allow the researchers to explore questions that are normally impossible to ask.

Dr Rick Adams, from the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, says: “We wanted something that shows people what neuroscience is really about. It’s not all brains in jars or men in white coats. It’s actually trying to answer questions all of us are interested in, like ‘What makes me happy?’. We hope that people enjoy our app, tell their friends and help us answer some important scientific questions along the way.”

The free app has been developed for Brain Awareness Week 2013 (11-17th March 2013) and is being supported by the +Wellcome Trust 

#ScienceSunday  
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