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The First Online Tank Museum
The First Online Tank Museum

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When it is considered that the Carden Loyd tankettes were amongst the cheapest armored vehicles before WW2, it does not come as a big surprise that even the Netherlands bought five of these.

Delivered in 1931, they remained the only armored tracked vehicles in military use until 1940 when they were used to defend the country and all lost to the Germans.

Written be Leander Jobse
Illustrated by David Bocquelet
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When it is considered that the Carden Loyd tankettes were amongst the cheapest armored vehicles before WW2, it does not come as a big surprise that even the Netherlands bought five of these.

Delivered in 1931, they remained the only armored tracked vehicles in military use until 1940 when they were used to defend the country and all lost to the Germans.

Written be Leander Jobse
Illustrated by David Bocquelet

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When it is considered that the Carden Loyd tankettes were amongst the cheapest armored vehicles before WW2, it does not come as a big surprise that even the Netherlands bought five of these.

Delivered in 1931, they remained the only armored tracked vehicles in military use until 1940 when they were used to defend the country and all lost to the Germans.

Written be Leander Jobse
Illustrated by David Bocquelet

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The Vickers Medium, the tank that saved the Royal Armoured Corp, and served for nearly 20 years.

It laid the foundation for several nations' tank forces and was still going in the Second World War, where it may have seen combat. It was also the basis of numerous variants and spin offs. The experiences that the British got from the Vickers Medium series was put to good use in the early stages of the Second World War.

An article written by David 'Listy' Lister and illustrated by David Bocquelet and William 'Rhictor' Byrd. Illustrations partly funded by Golum through our Patreon campaign.

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The Vickers Medium, the tank that saved the Royal Armoured Corp, and served for nearly 20 years.

It laid the foundation for several nations' tank forces and was still going in the Second World War, where it may have seen combat. It was also the basis of numerous variants and spin offs. The experiences that the British got from the Vickers Medium series was put to good use in the early stages of the Second World War.

An article written by David 'Listy' Lister and illustrated by David Bocquelet and William 'Rhictor' Byrd. Illustrations partly funded by Golum through our Patreon campaign.

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The Vickers Medium, the tank that saved the Royal Armoured Corp, and served for nearly 20 years.

It laid the foundation for several nations' tank forces and was still going in the Second World War, where it may have seen combat. It was also the basis of numerous variants and spin offs. The experiences that the British got from the Vickers Medium series was put to good use in the early stages of the Second World War.

An article written by David 'Listy' Lister and illustrated by David Bocquelet and William 'Rhictor' Byrd. Illustrations partly funded by Golum through our Patreon campaign.
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It is commonly accepted that the tank was invented by the British in WW1 as a means to break the stalemate of trench warfare. What is not well known is the number of armored vehicles designed and used which predate the appearance of a modern tank.

There were many ideas from ancient times to the medieval period for covered wagons or protected carts, but none of these machines had the fundamental element of a modern fighting vehicle: an engine. One of the first vehicles combining both protection for the crew, offensive weaponry, and an engine was designed not in the early years of the 20th century, but in 1855.

The designers, Messrs. James Cowen (of Greycoat Street, Westminster, London) and James Sweetlong (Earl-Street, Westminster, London) submitted their design requesting a Patent on the 3rd April 1855 under reference number ‘747’.

An article by Andrew Hills
Illustrated by Jaycee ‘AmazingAce’ Davis, funded by Fred Oliver through our Patreon campaign.
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It is commonly accepted that the tank was invented by the British in WW1 as a means to break the stalemate of trench warfare. What is not well known is the number of armored vehicles designed and used which predate the appearance of a modern tank.

There were many ideas from ancient times to the medieval period for covered wagons or protected carts, but none of these machines had the fundamental element of a modern fighting vehicle: an engine. One of the first vehicles combining both protection for the crew, offensive weaponry, and an engine was designed not in the early years of the 20th century, but in 1855.

The designers, Messrs. James Cowen (of Greycoat Street, Westminster, London) and James Sweetlong (Earl-Street, Westminster, London) submitted their design requesting a Patent on the 3rd April 1855 under reference number ‘747’.

An article by Andrew Hills
Illustrated by Jaycee ‘AmazingAce’ Davis, funded by Fred Oliver through our Patreon campaign.

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It is commonly accepted that the tank was invented by the British in WW1 as a means to break the stalemate of trench warfare. What is not well known is the number of armored vehicles designed and used which predate the appearance of a modern tank.

There were many ideas from ancient times to the medieval period for covered wagons or protected carts, but none of these machines had the fundamental element of a modern fighting vehicle: an engine. One of the first vehicles combining both protection for the crew, offensive weaponry, and an engine was designed not in the early years of the 20th century, but in 1855.

The designers, Messrs. James Cowen (of Greycoat Street, Westminster, London) and James Sweetlong (Earl-Street, Westminster, London) submitted their design requesting a Patent on the 3rd April 1855 under reference number ‘747’.

An article by Andrew Hills
Illustrated by Jaycee ‘AmazingAce’ Davis, funded by Fred Oliver through our Patreon campaign.

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The "Type T-34” is a made-up designation for the T-34/76 in Chinese PLA (People’s Liberation Army) service.

The only suggestion of the PLA operating the T-34/76 comes from the video game, World of Tanks, and their Chinese client company, Kongzhong. It is claimed that these tanks were supplied to the PRC (People’s Republic of China) in the early 1950s by the USSR, along with thousands of other tanks. Whilst it is true that the PRC was sold as many as 3000 AFVs in the years 1950-1955, neither company can provide any proof for the T-34/76 being included in these arms sales.

As such, the use of the T-34/76 by the PLA can only be concluded to be a hoax, intended as a credible means of filling up the World of Tanks “Chinese tech tree”, which is riddled with both historical inaccuracies and pure fantasies but remains presented as historical fact...

An article by Will Kerrs
Illustrated by Jaycee 'AmazingAce' Davis
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