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Karen Peterson
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Affordable genealogical research. 20+ years experience researching family histories.
Affordable genealogical research. 20+ years experience researching family histories.

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Today is Love Your Red Hair Day. Red hair is caused by a relatively rare recessive allele (variant of a gene). The gene is recessive and can skip several generations. The MC1R gene is located on the long arm of chromosome 16. For a child to have red hair both parents must be carriers of the recessive gene and there is a 25% chance that their offspring will have it. Having red hair isn't the only thing that makes some redheads unique. They are also more likely to be left handed. Both characteristics come from recessive genes, which like to come in pairs. The MC1R gene is expressed in many cells, and is responsible for more than hair color. MC1R plays a role in inflammatory response, pain sensitivity, and the immune system.

Love Your Red Hair day encourages you to remember the myths and histories of redheads, but also to revel in the strength and beauty that is often associated with it. Remember, when the world is at your feet, you’re a blonde, when it’s carrying you on a chaise, you’re obviously a redhead. So go gather with other red heads and set the world on fire!
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Love Your Red Hair Day
Red hair is caused by a relatively rare recessive allele (variant of a gene). The gene is recessive and can skip several generations The
MC1R gene is located on the long arm of chromosome 16. For a child to have red hair both parents must be carriers of the...
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November is Family Stories Month

This Thanksgiving or any time in November, get the whole family together and share some stories. Ask the older generation to reminisce about their first job, their favorite radio or TV show, price of candy, favorite toys, high school memories, etc. Memories are great family possessions that genuinely bond hearts together.

If you are not fortunate enough to have family near you this season, go to a senior home and interact with them by playing cards or board games. You’ll find yourself listening to lots of stories about how generations before grew up and what life was like in years past. Furthermore, you may also meet a great friend.

Create new memories. Start an annual tradition with your kids. Find a time with your kids that will always be just yours. No relatives. No friends. No interruptions. Teach them a new game. Bake a favorite recipe or cookie. Do something that builds a memory together – without technology. Family stories live on for years to come. Never tire of sharing them with your family. Make new family memories together – after all, one day your kids will need those great stories to tell!

What about family legends and myths?

You might hear family lore or other stories about your ancestors. Almost everyone has a story that has been handed down about their ancestors. Some of these traditional stories may be quite factual; others are myth. Almost all family stories have some grain of truth, however. Family legends aren't usually conjured up out of nothing, and that smidgen of truth may be the clue that leads you to genealogical success. Maybe you have already heard some of these stories. Often, they are about how the family came to America or ethnic origins. So take note and take the time to research those family tales, even if only one proves to be true in the end.


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It's National Candy Corn Day karensgenealogytidbits.blogspot.com
      Candy Corn was invented by George Renninger, an employee of the Wunderle
Candy Company.   He was born December 14, 1856 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of John Renninger from Germany and Johanna Kimmerle of Ireland.    He married Sarah Lunney o...
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Happy Halloween karensgenealogytidbits.blogspot.com
Are there any witches in your family tree? If we can trace your family
back to colonial times, there have been many documentations of witch
trials, not only in Salem but in other towns that aren't quite so
notorious. Genealogical research can be bewitch...
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Using Timelines karensgenealogytidbits.blogspot.com
            We have ancestor charts and family
group sheets from the software that we use, but they tend to hide many of the
details of a person's life.  For a different view of an ancestor, I create a
timeline to plot out the events of an ancestor’s life. ...
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Back to Blogging
I have shut down my regular website "Rootspursuits.com".   I will be using my blog to keep everyone up to date.  I will continue to do research for clients.  My new email is karen.peterson.familyresearch@gmail.com
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Brick Wall Crack!! Here is my best attempt at a very complicated story. My husband’s grandfather, William, was adopted in Chicago in 1886. The adoptive parents did not know who the birth parents were. They got William when he was 12 days old as a foundling through a midwife. This was a complete dead end. So my husband took DNA tests through 23andMe and Ancestry.com. It has been two years. Two weeks ago we got a match of a 3rd cousin, Kristine, thru Ancestry. Between the cousin’s family tree and my husband’s family tree, we are certain that we are not related thru any of my husband’s known ancestors. Both trees are very well researched. So we have determined that we are related thru the adoptive parents and that the most recent common ancestor was the Kristine’s gr. gr. grandfather. William would be first cousin to Kristine’s grandmother and her siblings, and the unknown father or mother of William would be one of her gr. grandfather’s siblings. They were all from Norway, but two of the possible fathers were in the United States by 1884. They were the right age, and Chicago is one of their residences. In addition William’s picture taken as a young man resembles Kristine’s great uncle. But it looks like we have reached another dead end because we can’t determine exactly who it was that fathered William or where either of the possible fathers were in 1885. There is no 1890 census and city directories do not have either of the brothers. At least my husband knows he has Norwegian blood.
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One of my genealogy clients had an ancestor who according to family lore was in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The CCC was one of President Roosevelt’s New Deal programs. From 1933 to 1942, the CCC employed millions of young men to work planting trees, building flood barriers, fighting forest fires, and maintaining forest roads and trails in every state and territory in the United States. The men lived in work camps in a military-like setting. Personnel records of the CCC are stored at the National Archives and Records Administration in St. Louis, Missouri. These records hold a wealth of information, including birth information, parents, previous occupations, residences, schooling, health, physical description, contact information, the camp locations and personal notations. I was able to get his records, and it proved to hold a great deal of personal and genealogical information.
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