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Matthew Tuell
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So when I first got into 13th Age, the first two Battle Scenes volumes were already available for purchase in PDF format. I've been eagerly awaiting the third volume, and noticed yesterday that my LFGS actually had it in stock. It also seems that Pelgrane Press has been bundling both formats at their own webstore for a while, but is not selling the PDF separately. Is this sort of staggered release (first print and then PDF) typical for them? I'm used to PDFs being available before print editions. Does anyone know when Fire & Faith is supposed to be available for purchase as a PDF?

WARNING -- "Tales from Wilderland" SPOILERS...
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I'm confused by the following text from "Of Leaves & Stewed Hobbit" (this pertains to the battle at the Ringfort):

"Two Goblin Archers for every companion leave their bows to attack [the company] in the first wave, jagged knife in hand. Three rounds later, they are joined by one Orc Soldier and another Goblin Archer with knife for every companion."

Does that mean that in the third round every single Orc Soldier in the battle (one per companion) engages the company? Or does it mean one Goblin Archer per companion and a TOTAL of one Orc Soldier?

I'm about to run "Don't Leave the Path" from Tales from Wilderland for my group, which is six players strong. We are all relatively new to the system, having recently just completed the Marsh Bell adventure. Regarding the opening encounter, should I just leave the group of thugs as described or slightly increase their numbers?

I realize they aren't supposed to pose a serious threat, but I have a hard time even calling for an Awe check with a straight face if these three "cowards" are confronted by an opposing party twice their size in numbers (more if you count Baldor). I was thinking of adding one or maybe even two thugs to the scene, just to make it interesting. Or am I just overthinking it?

Curious to know how other referees handle spells like "cause light wounds." RAW, their range of "touch" probably requires a successful melee attack, right? At that point, why not save a spell slot and just swing a mace?

I'm tempted to treat it like a close range magic missile -- an automatic hit for 1d6+1 damage against a target in melee range.

Those of you who are experienced 13th Age GMs -- are you pretty comfortable with rolling for icon relationships once per session? I'm specifically wondering if I might get away with rolling them after every full heal-up instead of once each session, and maybe giving them proportionately stronger significance. One reason is that my group's sessions run a little on the short side (only 3 hours or so) and I'm a little concerned about getting overwhelmed with a lot of positive results.

Do I read correctly that the effect of Charm Person (p. 153) basically lasts forever unless you do something to force a saving throw? That feels pretty wrong, but I've been unable to find any clarification in the book or elsewhere online. Is it maybe implied that a daily spell wouldn't last more than a day?

From p. 145 of the core rulebook (concerning Wizards): "As with other spellcasters, your new spells at higher levels can be upgraded versions of spells you learned at lower levels. Quite often they’ll need to be since we aren’t making you choose all new spells as you rise in level."

I just can't begin to wrap my head around the meaning of that last sentence. So you can change your spells around any which way you like when you level up, right? Why should it be necessary to choose upgraded versions of previously known spells because you have the freedom to do so?

I can't possibly have paraphrased that correctly. What am I missing?

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The new Bundle of Holding is a package for Traveller20. I'm not at all familiar with this material and have no intention of ever playing that version of the game, but most of the stuff is described as including statistics for both T20 and Classic. I'm leaning against it, but wondering if anyone who knows more about this material than I do might have some thoughts to share:

https://bundleofholding.com/presents/Traveller20?utm_source=sendy&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=220Traveller20
Traveller20
Traveller20
bundleofholding.com

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I'm looking at a listing on Amazon for a hardcover "collector's edition" by Goodman Games. It definitely appears to be something different from the "Deluxe Collector's Edition", but I can't find mention anywhere else of any other hardcover version of the collector's edition (I'm aware of a softcover version that was made available because of the Epsilon City kickstarter).

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0997259000/sr=8-1/qid=1484593192/ref=olp_product_details?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=1484593192&sr=8-1

Is this legit? Or should we assume the listing is incorrect and that this is actually a softcover edition?

I've been working on my own version of a Necromancer class for my campaign, and am putting the final touches on the spell list. I'm feeling particularly pleased with the following spell design and thought I would share it. For a bit of context, my Necromancer class has no other access to Wish-like powers, so this is intended to be somewhat limited. Feedback is welcome!

SINISTER BARGAIN
Level: 8
Duration: See below
Range: Unlimited (see below)

When first cast, this spell requires the presence of a higher order demon or a greater devil, who will be pleased to grant the caster an audience (so long as the creature is not otherwise being harassed). Through the agency of this evil power, the caster will be immediately granted a Limited Wish in exchange for a permanent 1 point reduction in charisma. Once this initial pact is sealed, this same evil power (who will thereafter remain on a “friendly” footing with the Necromancer) may be called upon for purposes of casting this spell and obtaining a Limited Wish. The actual presence of the evil power is no longer required for these subsequent castings, but the cost of 1 point of charisma must be satisfied each time. A careful record of these losses (which may not be recovered by any means – not even a Restoration spell) must be kept, for every time the caster is thereafter reduced to less than zero HP, he or she must make a saving throw vs. death with a negative penalty equal to the sum total of charisma points lost as a result of casting this spell. Failure means instant death beyond recall, as the Necromancer’s soul will have been irrevocably claimed by the power with whom the pact was concluded. No power or spell – not even Wish – will be able to restore such a character to life.
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