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David Osumi-Sutherland
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JOB OPPORTUNITY AT VFB

Are you interested in the challenge of designing web tools to provide accurate answers to biologically important questions couched in the language of biology? Are you interested in the challenges of communicating and interacting with 3D image data? Do you have an eye for web design?

Virtual Fly Brain are looking for a front end web developer to help redesign our site.

Virtual Fly Brain is a data integration hub for Drosophila neurobiology.  We already integrate thousands of descriptions of neuro-anatomy along with 10s of thousands of annotations of expression and 3D images of neuroanatomy. We have a clear semantic scheme that provides the functionality our users need, and that runs from curation, through our OWL-based data models. Our new site must communicate these semantics clearly and elegantly whilst integrating an interactive 3D browser for images of neuroanatomy.

Details of the position, which is a combined post working with both VFB and The European Bank for induced pluripotent stem cells, are available here:

https://ig14.i-grasp.com/fe/tpl_embl01.asp?newms=jj&id=53352&aid=15470 

Cool github project to dynamically generate Markdown.
https://github.com/gajus/gitdown

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Common blue butterfly refusing to open its wings to show their lovely powdery blue side. (Wellcome Trust wetlands reserve, Hinxton, Cams).
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A pair of Burnet's moths mating on a thistle (Wellcome Trust wetlands reserve, Hinxton Cams)
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Pyramidal orchid.  Near Matching Green, Essex.
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In the field, lace bugs look like scrappy little specks, but up close they are beautifully intricate.

(Corythucha sp., photographed on new england aster, in Urbana)
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 +Maria Konnikova's NY Times article about the role of time and attention scarcity in the cycle of poverty was arresting and important. It really echoed some of the issues that we've seen at +Code for America - there's a section at the end of the article that is going to be quoted often by people involved in the business of improving government services:

"If poverty is about time and mental bandwidth as well as money, how does this change how we combat its effects? 'When we think about programs for the poor, we don’t ever think, hey, let’s give them programs that don’t use a lot of bandwidth,' says Mr. Mullainathan. Instead, we fault people for failing to sign up for programs that are ostensibly available, even though we don’t factor in the time and cognitive capacity they need to get past even the first step.

“'If I give people a very complicated form, it’s a big demand on cognitive capacity,' Mr. Shafir says. 'Take something like the Fafsa' — the Free Application for Federal Student Aid — 'Why is pickup for the low-income families less than 30 percent? People are already overwhelmed, and you go and give them an incredibly complicated form.'

"To him, the obvious conclusion is to radically change our thinking. 'Just like you wouldn’t charge them $1,000 to fill out a form, you shouldn’t charge them $1,000 in cognitive complexity,' he says. One study found that if you offer help with filling out the Fafsa form, pickup goes up significantly."

It starts with empathy

Jake Solomon has another take on the issue, which he explains so well in his post People, Not Data https://medium.com/@lippytak/people-not-data-47434acb50a8 about the work he and the other Code for America fellows in San Francisco did last year to simplify the compliance for Food Stamp recipients.  

What I love about Maria's article, though, is that it gives another way of thinking about why complex government forms are even worse than they appear, especially when it comes to providing services to people least able to deal with them.
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