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Safety Solutions Made Simple
Safety Solutions Made Simple

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CALLING ALL CARE HOME PROVIDERS!

Do you run or own a Care Home?

Are you looking for a better deal from your Fire Safety and Training provider?

With over 30 years’ experience, MAGG are the specialist Fire Safety and Training providers to the Care industry?

Visit us at www.magggroupltd.com to experience how MAGG Group can protect you and your business today.
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Unsure about whether you need a Fire Risk Assessment?

Is it worth paying someone to create one or can you do it yourself?

Check out our latest blog entry for more information, and for some very surprising facts!

http://bit.ly/2iIu7Lo
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ELECTRICAL SAFETY WEEK 2016

Don’t underestimate the risk from electricity. Just because there’s no flame doesn’t mean there’s no risk. Electrical wires don’t even need to touch anything for a spark to jump and a fire to start.


WHAT TO CHECK FOR – DANGER SIGNS

Watch out for hot plugs and sockets, fuses that blow for no reason, flickering lights, and scorch marks on sockets or plugs
Check electrical leads and plugs for wear and tear and faulty wiring. Frayed leads or exposed internal wires are fire risks.
Don’t overload sockets – use one plug in each socket.
Keep electrical leads, plugs and appliances away from water.
Keep electrical appliances clean and in good working order, and have them serviced regularly. This is especially important for washing machines and tumble dryers that may be left on overnight.
Never buy an electrical appliance without knowing it is safe to use. New appliances should have the British or European safety mark on them and if the appliance is second-hand, always have it checked by a qualified electrician before you use it.

PLUGS AND CABLES – THE RULES

Prevent Overheating – Use the right fuse!

Appliances that use upto 700 Watts (for example TV’s, table lamps, radios, videos/DVD players and electric clocks) need a 3-amp fuse.
Appliances that use 700 to 1000 Watts (for example vacuum cleaners, small electrical tools, blenders and food processors) need a 5-amp fuse.
Appliances that use more than 1000 Watts (for example kettles, computers, toasters, washing machines and hairdryers) need a 13-amp fuse.
Always check the wattage of the appliance before you fit a new fuse. If you’re not sure, ask a qualified electrician.
Throw away and replace damaged cables. Never use tape to mend or join cables.
Never run cables under mats or carpets where you cannot see wear and tear.
Use a ‘bar-type’ fused adaptor on a lead, rather than a ‘block-type’
Don’t allow the total amps of all plugs in the adaptor to add up to more than 13amps or 3000 Watts of power.
Don’t plug adaptors into adaptors – use one adaptor for each socket

ELECTRIC BLANKETS – DOES YOUR ELECTRIC BLANKET NEED REPLACING?

Check the blanket and it’s lead for the following signs of wear and tear.

Fraying fabric & exposed elements
Scorch marks, damaged or missing tapes
Damp patches & soiling
Worn lead or loose connections
Creasing or folding
Get your blanket tested by an expert every 3 years. For details of who can test your blanket ask the shop where you brought it or contact your council’s Trading Standards Department.
Replace blankets every 10 years. Never buy second-hand blankets and always check the British or European safety mark.

USE YOUR BLANKET SAFELY

Always follow the instructions.
Leave a blanket switched on all night only if it has thermostatic controls that make it safe to use all night. Otherwise, switch it off and unplug before you get into bed.
Don’t get an electric blanket wet. If it gets wet, don’t use it until it is completely dry. Never switch it on to dry it!
Store electric blankets flat or rolled, never fold them!
FIRES AND HEATERS

Keep them clear of curtains and furniture.
Don’t dry washing on or near heaters or on fireguards.
Sit at least one meter (3 feet) away.
Don’t cover the air vents of storage heaters, fan heaters and convection heaters.
Use a fireguard with open fires.

DEALING WITH ELECTRICAL FIRES

If an electrical fire is small and hasn’t spread, you may be able to tackle it yourself. But it is vital you do things right.

Pull the plug out or switch the power off at the fuse box. This may stop the fire immediately.
Smother the fire with a fire blanket.
Never use water on an electrical fire! Remember, if in doubt – get out, stay out and call 999.

DID YOU KNOW?

Many local Fire and Rescue Services will come to your home and carry out a Home Fire Risk Check to help keep you and your family safe. For more information on fire safety, visit www.direct.gov.uk/firekills, or contact your local Fire and Rescue Service (not 999).
You are half as likely to die in a house fire if you have a working smoke alarm. If a fire starts in your home, a smoke alarm gives you the time to get out.
Modern alarms are neat and tidy, cost around £10 and are easy to fit. You may find your local Fire and Rescue service may install one for you, for free, as part of a free home fire risk check.

REAL LIFE – A SIMPLE MISTAKE

Jo Clarke was busy cooking and didn’t and didn’t notice when the lead from the kettle got pushed onto a hot ring.
When flames suddenly shot up from the plug in the wall, Jo panicked.
She shouted for the children, got them out of the house and called 999 on her mobile.
By the time the fire brigade arrived one wall of the kitchen was badly damaged, but at least no one was hurt.
Treat electricity with care. Keep cables free from dangers.
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CELEBRATE SAFELY

CELEBRATIONS ARE AN EXCUSE TO HAVE FUN, NOT AN EXCUSE FOR A FIRE!

Fire safety is the last thing on your mind when you’re celebrating. But think about it – lots of guests, extra decorations, people smoking – all the everyday fire risks get bigger. Don’t let fire safety stop you enjoying yourself – know the risks and plan ahead.

DECORATIVE LIGHTS

Decorative lights don’t get used every day so give them a bit of extra thought.

Check the maximum amps that can be handled by the fuse in the plug. Most decorative lights should be fitted with a 3amp fuse, so don’t try and wire extra sets into the same plug!
If bulbs blow, replace them. If bulbs continue to blow, replace the lights.
Turn decorative lights off at night and when you go out.
Don’t let bulbs touch anything that can burn easily like paper, fabrics and tinsel

CANDLES

Treat candles as you would any other flame

Don’t leave them unattended
Put them out completely at night
Don’t let them fall over, use a candlestick holder
Always place candles on heat resistant surfaces, even tea lights can melt plastic surfaces like TV tops
Keep them away from anything that can catch fire, like curtains, decorations and artificial Christmas trees.

FIREWORKS AND DECORATIONS

Given half a chance, paper decorations will burn

Use common sense and keep decorations and greeting cards away from heaters, lights, the fireplace and candles
Don’t fool with fireworks, they’re explosives not toys
Only buy fireworks marked with British Safety Standards BS7114 and always read the instructions.

HAVING A PARTY

Do yourself and your visitors a favour – don’t leave fire safety to the morning after!

Let your guests know where to find window and door keys
Look out for elderly people, children and anyone with problems getting about.
Make sure exits are clear
If people are smoking, put out extra ashtrays and make sure all cigarettes are put out properly – cigarettes can burn at over 700C, they’re hotter than you think!


REAL LIFE – UNHAPPY CHRISTMAS

On Christmas Eve 2001, the Lloyd family popped next door for a Christmas Drink.

‘I didn’t give the fairy lights a second thought’ says Pauline Lloyd ‘only to think how nice they looked.’

It’s an oversight Pauline wished she could forget.

The fairy lights set fire to the curtains. Luckily a neighbour spotted the flames and raised the alarm.

‘We had a miserable start to the New Year’, says Pauline. ‘The front room was ruined. I’m so careful now – I never leave any lights on when I go out. It’s not worth the risk’.
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BONFIRE NIGHT SAFETY

Despite annual safety warnings, firework celebrations still end in painful injuries for too many people, including very young children.

Yet fireworks can be great fun for families, not just around November 5 (Bonfire Night/Guy Fawkes Night), but also Diwali, New Year’s Eve and Chinese New Year.

Injury figures support the advice that the safest place to enjoy fireworks is at a large public display – far fewer people are injured here than at smaller family or private parties.

But if you’ll be having a firework party at home, you can make the occasion fun and safe for everyone by following the Firework Code, as well as some sparkler and bonfire safety tips.

BONFIRE SAFETY TIPS

If you have a bonfire, follow these simple guidelines:

Warn your neighbours beforehand – so they are aware and can make necessary preparations
Only burn dry material, do not burn anything which is wet or damp, this causes more smoke
Check there are no cables (telephone wires etc) above the bonfire
Build the bonfire away from sheds, fences and trees
Don’t use petrol or paraffin to start the fire it can get out of control quickly

ONCE THE BONFIRE IS LIT, MAKE SURE YOU:

Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose nearby – in case of emergencies
Don’t leave the bonfire unattended
Keep children and pets away from the bonfire
Don’t throw any fireworks into the fire
Don’t burn aerosols, tyres, canisters or anything containing foam or paint – this could produce toxic fumes and some containers may explode, causing injury
Once the bonfire has died down, spray the embers with water to stop it reigniting

FIREWORK SAFETY TIPS

Having fireworks at home can be great fun, if they are used safely. Figures show more children rather than adults get hurt by fireworks. Over the past five years over 350 pre-school children, some only a year old, were treated in hospital for fireworks injuries.

WHERE TO BUY

Don’t cut corners just to save a few quid. Always buy fireworks from a reputable shop to make sure that they conform to British Standards. This means that they should have BS 7114 written on the box.
Sometimes shops open for a short time before Bonfire Night but these may not be the best places to buy fireworks from. Staff in these shops might not be very knowledgeable about using fireworks safely and their fireworks might not meet British Standards.
Whatever you do, don’t buy fireworks from anywhere you’re not sure about, such as the back of a van or from a temporary, unlicensed market stall.

SETTING THEM OFF

Only one person should oversee fireworks. If that’s you, then make sure you take all the necessary precautions. Read the instructions in daylight and don’t drink any alcohol until they’ve all been discharged. Make your preparations in advance, and in daylight.

ON THE NIGHT, YOU WILL NEED:

A torch.
A bucket or two of water.
Eye protection and gloves.
A bucket of soft earth to put fireworks in.
Suitable supports and launchers if you’re setting off Catherine wheels or rockets


SPARKLERS

A sparkler can reach a temperature of up to 2,000°C – ie 20 times the boiling point of water, according to the Child Accident Prevention Trust – so the safety advice is:

Light sparklers one at a time and wear gloves
Don’t give sparklers to children under the age of five – they don’t properly understand why they can be dangerous
Don’t hold babies and young children while you’re holding a sparkler in case they reach out unexpectedly
Supervise children aged five and over when they’re holding sparklers
Make sure children are wearing gloves (but be aware that they won’t fully protect their hands from burns)
Don’t let children run around with sparklers or pick spent sparklers up once they’ve finished
Have buckets of water to put spent sparklers in

FIREWORK CODE

Only buy fireworks marked BS 7114
Don’t drink alcohol if setting off fireworks
Keep fireworks in a closed box
Follow the instructions on each firework
Light them at arm’s length, using a taper
Stand well back
Never go near a firework that has been lit
Even if it hasn’t gone off, it could still explode
Never put fireworks in your pocket or throw them
Always supervise children around fireworks
Light sparklers one at a time and wear gloves
Never give sparklers to a child under five
Keep pets indoors
Don’t let off fireworks after 11pm

ALCOHOL AND FIREWORKS SAFETY

People drink alcohol at 90% of fireworks parties in back gardens. In a survey, 84% of respondents said that people setting off fireworks had drunk at least 2-3 units of alcohol. This increases the risk of injury and makes adults less able to supervise children properly during the display.

Never drink alcohol if you are setting off fireworks or attending a bonfire.
Nominate people who are not drinking alcohol to take charge of late-night fireworks displays.
Keep guests who are drinking alcohol well away from fireworks and the bonfire.
Consider limiting the availability of alcohol until after the fireworks display.
Do not carry fireworks in your pocket to street parties or celebrations.
The clear message is that alcohol and fireworks don’t mix.
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CANDLE SAFETY – THE ESSENTIALS

Candle safety is very important. The flame may be small – but more than five fires a day are started by candles. It only takes a moment’s distraction for a fire to start but the consequences can be tragic. It’s important to treat lighted candles as you would any other flame – with care!

Keep candles away from draughts – and anything that can easily catch fire like furniture or curtains.

Don’t let candles fall over! – You need to keep candles firmly upright in a proper holder.

Always place candles on a heat resistant surface. Night lights and tea lights can melt plastic surfaces like TV tops and bathtubs.

Don’t lean across candles! – You could set fire to your clothes or hair.

Always leave a gap of at least four inches (10 cm) between two burning candles.

Remember – Use a glass or metal holder for scented candles, which turn into liquid to release their fragrance.

Mind the gap! – Don’t put candles under shelves or other surfaces.

Don’t let anything fall into the hot wax like matchsticks.

Use a ‘snuffer’ or a spoon to put candles out. It’s safer than blowing them, which can send sparks and hot wax flying.

Always – put candles out before you move them.

Never – leave candles unattended and put them out completely at night.

Keep candles out of reach of children and pets.

Candles – that have been put out can go on smouldering and start a fire.


The best way for you to protect yourself and your home is to buy a smoke alarm. They cost from as little as £5 and you can be brought from supermarkets or directly from a reputable fire protection company such as MAGG. Remember to test them every week!
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CANDLE SAFETY – THE ESSENTIALS

Candle safety is very important. The flame may be small – but more than five fires a day are started by candles. It only takes a moment’s distraction for a fire to start but the consequences can be tragic. It’s important to treat lighted candles as you would any other flame – with care!

Keep candles away from draughts – and anything that can easily catch fire like furniture or curtains.

Don’t let candles fall over! – You need to keep candles firmly upright in a proper holder.

Always place candles on a heat resistant surface. Night lights and tea lights can melt plastic surfaces like TV tops and bathtubs.

Don’t lean across candles! – You could set fire to your clothes or hair.

Always leave a gap of at least four inches (10 cm) between two burning candles.

Remember – Use a glass or metal holder for scented candles, which turn into liquid to release their fragrance.

Mind the gap! – Don’t put candles under shelves or other surfaces.

Don’t let anything fall into the hot wax like matchsticks.
Use a ‘snuffer’ or a spoon to put candles out. It’s safer than blowing them, which can send sparks and hot wax flying.

Always – put candles out before you move them.

Never – leave candles unattended and put them out completely at night.

Keep candles out of reach of children and pets.

Candles – that have been put out can go on smouldering and start a fire.


The best way for you to protect yourself and your home is to buy a smoke alarm. They cost from as little as £5 and you can be brought from supermarkets or directly from a reputable fire protection company such as MAGG. Remember to test them every week!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
CANDLE SAFETY – THE ESSENTIALS

Candle safety is very important. The flame may be small – but more than five fires a day are started by candles. It only takes a moment’s distraction for a fire to start but the consequences can be tragic. It’s important to treat lighted candles as you would any other flame – with care!


Keep candles away from draughts – and anything that can easily catch fire like furniture or curtains.

Don’t let candles fall over! – You need to keep candles firmly upright in a proper holder.

Always place candles on a heat resistant surface. Night lights and tea lights can melt plastic surfaces like TV tops and bathtubs.

Don’t lean across candles! – You could set fire to your clothes or hair.

Always leave a gap of at least four inches (10 cm) between two burning candles.

Remember – Use a glass or metal holder for scented candles, which turn into liquid to release their fragrance.
Mind the gap! – Don’t put candles under shelves or other surfaces.

Don’t let anything fall into the hot wax like matchsticks.
Use a ‘snuffer’ or a spoon to put candles out. It’s safer than blowing them, which can send sparks and hot wax flying.

Always – put candles out before you move them.

Never – leave candles unattended and put them out completely at night.

Keep candles out of reach of children and pets.

Candles – that have been put out can go on smouldering and start a fire.


The best way for you to protect yourself and your home is to buy a smoke alarm. They cost from as little as £5 and you can be brought from supermarkets or directly from a reputable fire protection company such as MAGG. Remember to test them every week!

Post has attachment
CELEBRATE SAFELY

CELEBRATIONS ARE AN EXCUSE TO HAVE FUN, NOT AN EXCUSE FOR A FIRE!

Fire safety is the last thing on your mind when you’re celebrating. But think about it – lots of guests, extra decorations, people smoking – all the everyday fire risks get bigger. Don’t let fire safety stop you enjoying yourself – know the risks and plan ahead.

DECORATIVE LIGHTS

Decorative lights don’t get used every day so give them a bit of extra thought.

Check the maximum amps that can be handled by the fuse in the plug. Most decorative lights should be fitted with a 3amp fuse, so don’t try and wire extra sets into the same plug!
If bulbs blow, replace them. If bulbs continue to blow, replace the lights.
Turn decorative lights off at night and when you go out.
Don’t let bulbs touch anything that can burn easily like paper, fabrics and tinsel
CANDLES

Treat candles as you would any other flame

Don’t leave them unattended
Put them out completely at night
Don’t let them fall over, use a candlestick holder
Always place candles on heat resistant surfaces, even tea lights can melt plastic surfaces like TV tops
Keep them away from anything that can catch fire, like curtains, decorations and artificial Christmas trees.

FIREWORKS AND DECORATIONS

Given half a chance, paper decorations will burn

Use common sense and keep decorations and greeting cards away from heaters, lights, the fireplace and candles
Don’t fool with fireworks, they’re explosives not toys
Only buy fireworks marked with British Safety Standards BS7114 and always read the instructions.

HAVING A PARTY

Do yourself and your visitors a favour – don’t leave fire safety to the morning after!

Let your guests know where to find window and door keys
Look out for elderly people, children and anyone with problems getting about.
Make sure exits are clear
If people are smoking, put out extra ashtrays and make sure all cigarettes are put out properly – cigarettes can burn at over 700C, they’re hotter than you think!

REAL LIFE – UNHAPPY CHRISTMAS

On Christmas Eve 2001, the Lloyd family popped next door for a Christmas Drink.

‘I didn’t give the fairy lights a second thought’ says Pauline Lloyd ‘only to think how nice they looked.’

It’s an oversight Pauline wished she could forget.

The fairy lights set fire to the curtains. Luckily a neighbour spotted the flames and raised the alarm.

‘We had a miserable start to the New Year’, says Pauline. ‘The front room was ruined. I’m so careful now – I never leave any lights on when I go out. It’s not worth the risk’.

Post has attachment
CELEBRATE SAFELY

CELEBRATIONS ARE AN EXCUSE TO HAVE FUN, NOT AN EXCUSE FOR A FIRE!

Fire safety is the last thing on your mind when you’re celebrating. But think about it – lots of guests, extra decorations, people smoking – all the everyday fire risks get bigger. Don’t let fire safety stop you enjoying yourself – know the risks and plan ahead.

DECORATIVE LIGHTS

Decorative lights don’t get used every day so give them a bit of extra thought.

Check the maximum amps that can be handled by the fuse in the plug. Most decorative lights should be fitted with a 3amp fuse, so don’t try and wire extra sets into the same plug!
If bulbs blow, replace them. If bulbs continue to blow, replace the lights.
Turn decorative lights off at night and when you go out.
Don’t let bulbs touch anything that can burn easily like paper, fabrics and tinsel

CANDLES

Treat candles as you would any other flame

Don’t leave them unattended
Put them out completely at night
Don’t let them fall over, use a candlestick holder
Always place candles on heat resistant surfaces, even tea lights can melt plastic surfaces like TV tops
Keep them away from anything that can catch fire, like curtains, decorations and artificial Christmas trees.

FIREWORKS AND DECORATIONS

Given half a chance, paper decorations will burn

Use common sense and keep decorations and greeting cards away from heaters, lights, the fireplace and candles
Don’t fool with fireworks, they’re explosives not toys
Only buy fireworks marked with British Safety Standards BS7114 and always read the instructions.
HAVING A PARTY

Do yourself and your visitors a favour – don’t leave fire safety to the morning after!

Let your guests know where to find window and door keys
Look out for elderly people, children and anyone with problems getting about.
Make sure exits are clear
If people are smoking, put out extra ashtrays and make sure all cigarettes are put out properly – cigarettes can burn at over 700C, they’re hotter than you think!


REAL LIFE – UNHAPPY CHRISTMAS

On Christmas Eve 2001, the Lloyd family popped next door for a Christmas Drink.

‘I didn’t give the fairy lights a second thought’ says Pauline Lloyd ‘only to think how nice they looked.’

It’s an oversight Pauline wished she could forget.

The fairy lights set fire to the curtains. Luckily a neighbour spotted the flames and raised the alarm.

‘We had a miserable start to the New Year’, says Pauline. ‘The front room was ruined. I’m so careful now – I never leave any lights on when I go out. It’s not worth the risk’.
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