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John Russell
Works at University of Oregon
Attended Indiana University
Lived in Eugene, OR
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John Russell

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Really cool digital project at Stanford!
Nature is unevenly distributed in and across cities despite the fact that much else about cities scales with population. The City Nature project combines spatial analysis of parks and other natural ar...
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John Russell

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Draft U of California OA policy goes out for review

On August 9, the U of California Academic Council sent a draft OA policy to the system's 10 campuses for review. Comments are due by January 11, 2013. The policy home page has links to the draft text, a policy FAQ, and some related handouts for faculty.

It's time for friends of OA at the U of California to educate their colleagues about the issues and persuade their campus senates to support the policy. Please spread the word to any colleagues at UC.

#oa #openaccess #ucalifornia  
Reshaping Scholarly Communications is a web portal for stakeholders working to reshape scholarly communication, including libraries, University faculty and administration, and publishers.
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Audio from our Imaginary John Cage performance on Friday. We're looking for other performances (lined up one in Seattle next month), so if you want to have this performed in your town and have 12 video game players, let me know.
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Poster for upcoming performance of my John Cage-inspired composition for 12 video games
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Should note that there's a blog for more info: http://imaginaryjohncage.wordpress.com
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Kim Yi Dionne originally shared:
 
if nothing else, I recommend clicking through to listen to Ojukwu's address during the Biafran war.
[Ojukwu] said very little but I wanted to ask a simple question, so when the session ended I managed to stop him for a moment and ask if he had any regrets about the war. He paused but did not turn his head. “History does not repeat itself,” he growled. “But if it did, I would do exactly the same again. Excuse me.” He moved on. That is from Richard Dowden’s post to the African Arguments blog, “Revisiting Biafra: Civil War Leader Ojukwu Dies.” In ...
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An American Fall. Posted on October 16, 2011 by Wayne Bivens-Tatum. Most of you probably know that the Occupy Wall Street movement in NYC has a library, appropriately enough called the Occupy Wall Str...
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The weight of the Yankees' loss just caused Twitter to collapse.
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John Russell

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Second shoe drops: new White House Directive mandates OA

The Obama White House today directed federal agencies to develop open-access policies within the next six months. The directive comes from John Holdren <http://goo.gl/T02gj>, President Obama's chief Science Advisor.

White House announcement
http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/02/22/expanding-public-access-results-federally-funded-research

Directive itself
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/ostp_public_access_memo_2013.pdf

This is big. It's big in its own right, and even bigger when put together with FASTR <http://bit.ly/hoap-fastr>, the bipartisan OA bill introduced into both houses of Congress just eight days ago. We now have OA mandates coming from both the executive and legislative branches of government. 

The two approaches complement one another. FASTR does not make the White House directive unnecessary. FASTR may never be adopted. And if it is adopted, it will be after some time for study, education, lobbying, amendment, negotiation, and debate. By contrast, the White House directive takes effect today. The wheels are already turning. Compared to this executive action, FASTR is slower. (Thanks to Becky Cremona for this good line.)

Similarly, the White House directive does not make FASTR unnecessary. On the contrary, we need legislation to codify federal OA policies. The next president could rescind today's White House directive, but could not rescind legislation. (One lesson: Don't let up in efforts to persuade Congress to pass FASTR.)

The White House directive and FASTR pull in the same general direction, but they are not identical. Here are the key points of similarity and difference:

* Both ask a wide range of federal funding agencies to require OA for the results of the research they fund. But the new directive applies to more agencies. FASTR covers all the agencies spending at least $100 million/year funding extramural research. The directive covers all the agencies spending at least $100 million/year funding extramural research or development. FASTR applies to about 11 agencies and the directive to about 19. Among the agencies omitted by FASTR but covered by the directive are USAid and the Smithsonian Institution.

* Both put a limit on permissible embargoes, but the directive allows longer embargoes. FASTR caps embargos at six months, and the directive caps them at 12 months. Under the directive, agencies may ask White House permission to allow even longer embargoes, but they must submit data to support their requests.

* Both ask agencies to develop their own policies within certain guidelines. FASTER gives them a year to do so (starting when FASTR is adopted) and the directive gives them half a year to do so (starting today).

If FASTR is eventually adopted, then all the FASTR-covered agencies will already have OA policies under today's directive. Some agencies may have to revise their policies to comply with FASTR guidelines, for example, reducing permissible embargoes to a maximum of six months or tweaking their libre or open-licensing requirements.

* FASTR is silent on data, but the White House directive requires OA for articles (Section 3) and OA for data (Section 4). 

* Both FASTR and the directive are solid green mandates, requiring deposit in an OA repository (green OA) and remaining silent about publishing in OA journals (gold OA). In that sense, both initiatives build on the successful green OA mandate at the NIH, and reject the gold-favoring approach adopted by the Research Councils UK. 

* Both FASTR and the directive require agency policies to permit libre OA or to license repository deposits for reuse. They use different language to describe the desired type of freedom, and do not specify individual licenses.

.....

The Obama White House has twice collected public comments on federal OA policy. One public consultation ended in January 2010 and the other ended in January 2012. The new directive builds on those comments, which overwhelmingly supported OA. Here are the two sets of comments received.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2010/03/08/public-access-policy-update
http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2012/01/30/your-comments-access-federally-funded-scientific-research-results

The White House was also pressured by a May 2012 "We the people" petition that only needed 25k signatures in the first 30 days to elicit an official response. It received that many in 14 days, and today has 65,700+ signatures. While we reached the response threshold eight months ago, I think it's fair to say that today's response is what we were waiting for.
http://wh.gov/6TH

Today's directive is accompanied by a separate, direct response to the petition.
https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/response/increasing-public-access-results-scientific-research

This is another in a series of blog posts on FASTR and other federal actions to support OA to federally-funded research. I'll pull the series of posts together for an article in the March issue of the SPARC Open Access Newsletter.

#oa #openaccess #fastr #opendata #obamadirective
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Kim Yi Dionne originally shared:
 
Ghana didn't seem as close to danger as the trailer would lead us to believe, but I'll admit I still want to see this. HT +Tracy Baker.
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Kim Yi Dionne originally shared:
 
it's true: data doesn't want to live in the depths of loneliness that is your hard drive.
...I said that once to a friend from grad school when he asked why a project* I worked on was uploading anonymized data we had collected and managed for over a decade for others to analyze. I was ...
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David Baker originally shared:
 
One of my students is in Dakar, working at Manooré FM 89.4, La Voix des Femmes, which was destroyed in a fire last month. No one was injured, but Senegal lost its first radio station devoted entirely to women’s issues and training women in journalism. This link is to a site devoted to the rebuilding effort. Please spread the word, and donate if you can!

From the site: "Their mission from the beginning has been to use mass communication to respond to the information and communication needs of women, to highlight their participation in sustainable development, and to spread messages of social justice, progress, equality, and equity. Manooré FM broadcast in 6 languages, reaching about 2 million men, women and children in Senegal. There mission was bold and their impact huge."
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Have him in circles
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In the Library with the Lead Pipe's profile photo
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Education
  • Indiana University
    MLS/Rare Books, 2004
  • University of Vermont
    History/Philosophy, 1994
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  • University of Oregon
    Social Sciences Librarian, 2007 - present
  • Georgia State University
    History Librarian, 2004 - 2007
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Eugene, OR - Atlanta, GA - Bloomington, IN - Rochester, NY - Boston, MA - Burlington, VT - Underhill, VT - State College, PA - Shelburne, VT - Ballston Lake, NY - Erie, PA
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