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SG Mikita Physical Therapy
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Recipe Wednesday - Pasta Caprese: Yum! Click here for this tasty recipe! http://bit.ly/2z8RFD9
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What You Can Do for Your Relatives: What You Can Do for Your Relatives Here is our latest monthly video. http://bit.ly/2kYOGbI
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Physical therapy following back surgery significantly helps recovery: More research is needed to identify the best protocols following surgery Low back pain is the single leading cause of disability throughout the world, and about 31 million Americans experience it at any given point in time. There are many different conditions that may lead to the development of low back pain, and one of the most common is called degenerative disc disease. This type of disorder occurs when intervertebral discs that rest between each bone (vertebra) of the spine experience changes that causes them to break down, which results in symptoms like low back and neck pain. Although non-surgical treatments like physical therapy is typically recommended at first for degenerative disc disease, a surgical procedure called lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) may be recommended if the condition doesn't improve or worsens. The goal of LTDR is to relieve pain and restore the motion of the spine, and the number of these surgeries performed has increased in recent times. Following surgery, physical therapy is often prescribed to help patients recover properly, but there is a general lack of research that investigates the effects of this type of treatment. For this reason, a study was conducted to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of physical therapy following an LTDR surgery in order to better guide medical professionals. Status of large group of patients monitored for two years Patients who underwent LTDR for degenerative disc disease or a similar condition were recruited, and a total of 600 fit the necessary criteria for the study. Following surgery, all patients were given the option of either rehabilitating on their own or receiving physical therapy. This led to 202 patients who rehabilitated on their own (group 1), 123 who received 1-3 sessions of physical therapy (group 2) and 275 who received four or more sessions of physical therapy. Physical therapy began four weeks after surgery and consisted of education on surgery and the recovery process, treatments administered by the therapist, and various exercises. The exercises focused on improving the way patients walked and aligning their posture, as well as stretching the legs and lower back. All patients were assessed for low back pain, disability, and quality of life at three, six, 12 and 24 months after surgery using a number of different tools. Patients who receive multiple sessions of physical therapy improve the most Results showed that patients who received four or more sessions of physical therapy following LTDR surgery (group 3) experienced the most significant improvements of all groups. In particular, these participants showed less functional disability, reduced pain and better quality of life than the other two groups. These improvements were noticed as early as three months and were maintained up until the final patient assessment at 24 months. Based on these findings, it appears that a physical therapy rehabilitation program consisting of at least four sessions is effective for reducing pain and disability and improving the quality of life for patients following LTDR. Though additional research is needed to confirm these findings, patients who are scheduled to have this type of back surgery should be sure to opt for physical therapy afterward in order to experience the best possible outcomes. -As reported in the September '16 issue of Physiotherapy Research International http://bit.ly/2kuuCh3
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Motivational Monday: -Anonymous http://l.ptclinic.com/2iOxYev
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Happy Holidays!: Warm wishes to you and your loved ones from our clinic! http://l.ptclinic.com/2izHqlM
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Recipe Wednesday - Braised Cod With Leeks: Simple yet sophisticated! Click here for this yummy recipe! http://bit.ly/2il5CrJ
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Walking meetings may increase physical activity in the workplace: No studies have looked into this type of approach yet Sitting for extended periods of time on a regular basis can lead to a number of health-related issues. Unfortunately, the majority of Americans spend a large part of their days sitting at a desk because it's part of their job. Walking, on the other hand, is known to have a positive impact on overall health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends walking at least 10,000 steps per day. Even walking for as little as 30 minutes each day has been found to reduce the risk for chronic diseases like osteoporosis, breast and colon cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Sadly, there are very few opportunities for workers who sit for most of the day to increase their physical activity levels and walk more at work. This is even more difficult in white-collar work environments, which generally don't support physical activity throughout the day, as is the case in many blue-collar environments. One way to increase the amount of physical activity in the workplace is by walking during meetings instead of sitting. Although this idea has been around for some time—and may even be used at some businesses already—no studies have been performed yet to investigate the effect of walking meetings on physical activity. Therefore, a pilot study was conducted to determine how walking meetings affect physical activity levels, and if this sort of program is acceptable and feasible. A pilot study is an initial study performed to decide if future research should be conducted on a topic. 17 workers participate in three-week study Researchers recruited groups of workers that had an established meeting time and met for 30 or 60 minutes every week. This process led to seven groups of two or three workers each being accepted, for a total of 17 participants. All participants were given an accelerometer (a device used to measure physical activity levels) at the start of the study to be worn throughout most of the day for the next three weeks. During the first week, groups were instructed to carry on with their traditional sitting meetings and regular work schedule so that standard data could be collected. For the next two weeks, they were told to modify one of their sitting meetings to a standing meeting instead. At the end of each week, participants filled out a survey that gave additional information on their physical activity levels. Finally, after the third and final week, all groups participated in a focus group with the researchers to discuss how the walking meetings went overall. Participants increase physical activity levels and find program to be easy to implement The data taken from the accelerometers and surveys showed that in general, workers were more physically active during the second two weeks of the study. The average number of minutes participants engaged in combined work-related moderate or vigorous physical activity per week increased from 107 during week 1, to 114 at week 2, and 117 at week 3. On the day of the walking meeting, the average number of minutes spent in physical activity increased from 34 minutes at week 1 to 43 minutes at week 3. All participants agreed to the strategy taught by researchers to organize and conduct the walking meetings, and all groups walked for 30-40 minutes during each walking meeting. In addition, participants said that the walking program was feasible, acceptable and easy to implement into their workday without interfering with workflow. Based on these findings, it appears that having walking meetings can be a feasible way to increase physical activity levels in an office work environment, and it's very easy to introduce. Since this is only a pilot study, more research and larger studies are needed to further evaluate these findings. Nonetheless, this study underlines one possible strategy to get individuals to be more physically active at work and counteract the effects of sitting for most of the day. -As reported in the June '16 issue of Preventing Chronic Disease http://bit.ly/2jWZhmT
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Happy Thanksgiving! http://bit.ly/2hWMhgx
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Motivational Monday: -Mahatma Gandhi http://bit.ly/2hOggY7
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