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Astrophotography Emagazine
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Owner & Editor of Amateur Astrophotography Ezine
Owner & Editor of Amateur Astrophotography Ezine

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Issue 51. Amateur Astrophotography Magazine
https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue51l

Processing a (noisy) DSLR image stack with StarTools

Using a DSLR camera for astrophotography has you dealing with quite noisy data, and the issue is compounded if you are shooting from the city under light-polluted skies. Noisy data gives you a hard time when processing, so it would initially take me quite some time and effort to get to pleasing results, even with dedicated software
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Amateur Astrophotography Magazine.
Issue 51
https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue51l

Processing in PixInsight
and Photoshop

For the postprocessing description we do not include screenshots of our various PixInsight settings. The reality is that settings are different for each image. We will, however, provide links to online resources which give descriptions of the techniques we use. These resources often provide settings to get you started.
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Amateur Astrophotography Magazine. Issue 51
https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography

Synscan Wifi Adapter

I was perusing Facebook and saw that Rother Valley Optics (fantastic astro shop btw) had some synscan wifi adapters back in stock for £53. Now being the gadget girl that I am, I had to buy one.It arrived very quickly and packaged well.
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Amateur Astrophotography Magazine. Issue 51
https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography

Why I’m Switching to a
Mono Astrophotography Camera!!


A mono astrophotography camera gives backyard imagers in the city the opportunity to collect dynamic narrowband images from home. Although LRGB image acquisition using a filter wheel requires some extra setup time early on, the flexibility of this configuration is appealing.
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Astrophotography on a Budget

Astrophotography can seem like a daunting hobby to jump into. Indeed, there are definitely learning curves to overcome, but if it’s something you’re interested in pursuing, our astronomers are always happy to help you along in your goal to capture some deep sky objects with your camera. To help you get started, I’ve written up a simple guide to help you get going!The Camera (of course!)Naturally, the first thing you’ll need is a camera to photograph the night sky with. Though many options exist, we’re going to stick to the more budget-minded route since that’s where most people will be coming from. The most accessible option would be to get a DSLR camera, such as a Canon Rebel.

https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue50s
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Powering your rig

Going remote with your Astrophotography Rig? You’ll need power. Quite a bit of it. Most people won’t want to have a generator ruining the peaceful solitude of the night, so battery power is the usual solution.So how much power do you need, what kind of batteries will do, how to connect to them, how to house them, how to charge them. all are good questions.How much power (capacity) do you need: This part isn’t hard to figure out, just be sure to count everything that needs power. Here’s some rough guidlines:

https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue50s
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Powering your rig

Going remote with your Astrophotography Rig? You’ll need power. Quite a bit of it. Most people won’t want to have a generator ruining the peaceful solitude of the night, so battery power is the usual solution.So how much power do you need, what kind of batteries will do, how to connect to them, how to house them, how to charge them. all are good questions.How much power (capacity) do you need: This part isn’t hard to figure out, just be sure to count everything that needs power. Here’s some rough guidlines:

https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue50s
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Real Results with a Budget Astrophotography Lens

A great astrophotography lens is only as good as the images it produces. Not all camera lenses are created equal, and imaging a night sky full of stars has a way of pushing your photography gear to its limits.On a recent astrophotography session in the backyard, I discovered how enjoyable it can be to squeeze in a brief mid-week session using a camera lens in place of the telescope.For this imaging run, I used the refreshingly simple and affordable Canon EF 50mm F/1.8 lens. The lens was attached to my Canon Rebel T3i DSLR, which rode atop an iOptron SkyTracker camera mount.

https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue50s
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Canon EOS 60Da: the return in astrophotography ( a look back)

In the middle of the last decade, and thanks to the success of DSLR in astronomy, Canon suddenly surprised the astrophotographers with a specialized camera. The Canon EOS 20Da was introduced in February 2005, and this was the first time for Canon and all other manufacturers to produce such a version of a standard camera. The 20Da was mainly based on 20D, but with substantial modifications, both hardware and software, and immediately was identified as the reflex for the astronomical usage, but also traditional diurnal usage was still possible.

https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue50s
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Sky-Watcher EQ6-R Under the Hood

One of my favourite cars is the Jaguar E-type. It caused a sensation when it was first launched and compared to the XK150 it replaced it epitomised the flare and panache of the 1960's. Thing is Jaguar had a bit of a problem, they wanted the car to be advertised that it was capable of 150 miles per hour... so they took it to the test rack, but the problem was that the original 3.8ltr original 6 cylinder engine wasn't quite up to the task! So they had to use a few tricks to get it past the magic 150 mph barrier. Such as – pumping up the tyres rock hard (it actually ran Dunlop R5 racing tyres) and tuned the car so it produced more power so it would make the timing run. Sounds familiar – doesn't it?

Read more here https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue50s
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