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TCC WorkforceVA
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Today's economy offers an unparalleled menu of opportunities for ambitious businesses. At the same time, rapidly changing technology and evolving business management practices continually upset the "old ways" of doing things. Often, the changes that business owners need to make to stay competitive affect seasoned workers more than their younger peers. A focused, clearly explained program of workforce training can alleviate these difficulties and create a stronger, happier team.

 Customized Training Solutions Build Morale While Addressing Your Needs

At Tidewater Community College, we offer workplace training solutions for virtually every business need. At the same time, we can't anticipate every demand that our hardworking clients and students bring to us. While we always keep our ear to the ground in an effort to identify new trends and technologies, the business owners of southeastern Virginia are even closer to the developments in their respective fields. That's why we offer customized training solutions for businesses of all sizes and types. After you've pored over your business plan and spoken with your employees about their training needs, contact us about setting up a customized workforce training plan.

 Technology That Smooths Over Differences

These days, technology drives many of the most disruptive workplace changes. Since older workers didn't grow up with many of the technologies that have become commonplace in the modern economy, it's critical to give your experienced team members a leg up. In addition to signing them up for convenient, flexible technology training courses, partner them with younger members of your workforce to reinforce what they learn.

 Reciprocal Education

Of course, seasoned employees have plenty to offer as well. Young workers who might be overconfident about their technological savvy can learn valuable lessons about time management and workplace communication. After you've enrolled them in a customized training course or business management initiative, have your older workers spend structured time with their younger counterparts .

 Demonstrate the Need for Change

In the end, the best way to "show" is to "do." As the leader of your workplace, you shouldn't feel like you're above the sort of workplace training initiatives in which you enroll your employees. By attending skills-building courses with your subordinates, you'll clearly demonstrate the need to invest in your company's future.

 Contact Virginia's Workforce Development Experts

No matter how you choose to reduce the tension between your key veterans and promising young stars, a strong business management plan is key. It's also critical to understand the full breadth of workforce development resources at your disposal. At Tidewater Community College, we take pride in helping southeastern Virginia's businesses position themselves to compete in a rapidly changing economy. Learn more about what we do by visiting us online or calling (757) 822-1234.
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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Just about everyone winds up in a job they hate at some point. When you find yourself there, don't waste time resenting it. Instead, try these tips for beating the things that bug you and how to make every day a great one.

Know the Work

If you have no real grasp of how your job fits into the big picture of the company you work for, it's hard to feel like you're making any kind of difference. Boost your sense of worth by taking time to understand how things work where you work. Seeing how important you are in the context of the company as a whole makes what you do every day more fulfilling. It also helps you to get into the rhythm of your job and establish a positive rapport with your boss and coworkers.

Know What You Do Well

Remember: everyone has something that they're awesome at. Maybe you're the best copywriter on the web design team. Whatever your strengths are, get familiar with them and show your co-workers and your boss what you can do. You'll blow them out of the water and potentially open up opportunities for future growth in your position. Plus, when you're doing something you're good at, it doesn't seem like work.

Work With a Diverse Group

If you're just starting out in your job and are finding it less than enjoyable, try to work with different people on every project you're assigned. This gives you a way to meet everyone around the office and provides opportunities to learn from others who have been with the company longer than you have. You'll pick up valuable tips that can make your job easier and more fun.

Be Happy

Simply deciding to be happy and acting on it with little things like saying hello to coworkers or bringing the person in the next cubicle coffee once and a while can change the whole atmosphere of the workplace. When you're happy, it spreads around to everyone else and makes the day easier for the whole team.

Ready to turn your daily grind into something exciting and fun? Contact the TCC Center for Workforce Solutions. Our workforce development training programs are designed to meet the needs of Virginia employees looking to expand their horizons and employers who want a more competent, empowered team. Let us customize classes or a whole program for your workplace and see how getting a better grasp on the day-to-day tasks of your job can make it more enjoyable. 
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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Easing Your Transition Back into the World of Work

When people say that they love to try new things, they're usually referring to a novel food item or exhilarating "adventure sport." When it comes to returning to the workplace after a lengthy layoff, most people are understandably skeptical—and nervous. While we can't cure the first-day jitters that you'll feel after switching careers and accepting a new position, we can help you prepare for the experience.

Complex and Tech-Oriented

If you've been out of the workforce for some time, you'll notice a few changes right off the bat. First, technology plays a much more important role in modern business practices than in the past. This demands workers with a strong base of technological knowledge as well as a willingness to learn new things. Continuing adult education programs that focus on technology are a must.

Leaner and More Productive

It's also important to note that the modern workplace is far leaner and more productive than previous iterations. This offers advantages and challenges for workers. On the plus side, a leaner workplace is easier to navigate and understand. On the other hand, managers and business owners need to do more with less in a competitive economy. As such, workers may find themselves with more aggressive workloads and bigger bundles of expectations.

Less Security, More Opportunity

In the middle of the 20th century, it was quite common for workers to spend their whole lives within a single organization. Today, this is rarely the case. In some industries, workers may spend their entire careers bouncing from employer to employer. Employment terms of five years or fewer represent the "new normal." At the same time, the modern workplace tends to reward talent more efficiently. This creates more opportunity for ambitious, competent workers.

Politics and Communication

Lastly, the modern workplace is more complex than the offices of yore. New laws that protect workers from discrimination and unfair practices have created new expectations for returning employees. While it may take some time for seasoned employees to adjust to the new human resources environment, most observers agree that the "new" workplace is fairer, more equitable and more productive than ever.

Tidewater Community College: Your Virginia Workforce Solutions Resource

Knowing that you have to prepare yourself for a radically changed workplace is one thing, but actually taking the plunge is quite another. If you're intimidated by the prospect of changing careers or returning to work after years off, you're not alone. To ensure that you give yourself every chance to succeed in your new endeavor, visit our Suffolk location or call (757) 822-1234 for more information about continuing adult education in southeastern Virginia. 
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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Workforce development and the importance of bilingualism 

Any business that wants to continuously grow and thrive should strongly consider placing a major emphasis on developing a bilingual staff. After all, English isn't the only language that will be spoken by your customers, and you can more effectively reach out to a wider audience if you have at least one employee who can speak multiple languages. For example, Census data indicates that 4.8% of Virginia residents speak Spanish, and this means that your company probably needs someone who is fluent in this language in order to meet the needs of all of your local clients. 

How Can We Attract Bilingual Candidates? 

The first step toward building a bilingual staff is to make it clear in your employment advertisements that being bilingual is a plus. Keep in mind that it's not necessary for everyone on your staff to speak another language, but it can be very beneficial to have at least one person available who can speak and write in each of the major languages. In other words, Spanish, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Arabic and Chinese are definitely languages to target, and you should also consider the specific needs of your target market areas. 

Nurturing Bilingual Employees

Studying another language at some point in the past will not keep your bilingual employees up to date enough to be completely reliable. Therefore, you need to provide them with opportunities to continuously practice their skills and acquire new knowledge. Keep in mind that if you've branched out to an international market, your bilingual workers could be expected to have at least a basic grasp of regional colloquialisms when they speak to your clients. Fortunately, these employees can take refresher courses and sign up for advanced classes that will keep them updated on regional phrases and slang terms. 

Preparing Your Management Staff for Success

Even if your management staff doesn't speak multiple languages, they'll need to be properly trained to understand the importance of working with employees who are bilingual. We can offer customized training that can assist with this process. We also recommend selecting a high-level employee to learn at least the basics of the most common secondary language that your company will encounter based on your specific customers and location. 

Is Bilingualism Really Necessary?

You should definitely consider bilingualism to be an integral part of your business plan unless you want to appeal to only one customer base in a limited market. As an added bonus, research indicates that bilingual individuals are typically more intelligent than those who speak only one language. If you need assistance with the management aspects of this business reality, contact TCC Workforce Solutions to learn how we can help.
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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These days, gaining an edge over your competitors requires more than keen marketing and financial wizardry. Over the long haul, companies that uphold the values and mission objectives upon which they were founded tend to attract and retain customers with more success than competitors that don't accurately reflect the values set forth in their corporate literature. Career training can be a powerful tool for forward-looking business leaders.
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Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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Among American workers, few phrases conjure more dread than "performance review." This ubiquitous evaluation has been the butt of jokes—and the inspiration of much panic—for years, and the next generation of human resources professionals places even more emphasis on such "personal" assessments of workers' efficacy. Before your next performance review, take a moment to learn more about how it's likely to work and what you can do to prepare.
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Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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TCC WorkforceVA
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In the world of nonprofit law, disaster scenarios are common. For example, since 2010, approximately 550,000 organizations have had their tax-exempt status revoked for failure to file the Form 990 (or 990-EZ, or 990-n, where appropriate) for 3 consecutive years. Similarly, many organizations are subjected to heavy fines for failure to report unrelated business income tax, for misclassifying employees as independent contractors, or for conveying improper benefits to directors or officers. 

However, most of these legal mishaps can be prevented (or at least mitigated) by building good organizational habits and taking simple precautionary measures. This article discusses five key practices that lay the groundwork for any well-run nonprofit. Organizations that build these good habits early rarely suffer legal setbacks that cannot be corrected with minimal time and cost.

Have a Business Plan

Many small businesses are run in an informal way, without much forethought about revenue sources or essential expenses. Nonprofits do not have this luxury. Funding is too scarce and the administrative burdens too severe for a nonprofit to thrive without a rigorous planning process. A nonprofit’s business plan should include a fundraising plan (with a mix of donations, grants, and fee-for-service revenue that is tailored to your organization), a strategic plan (detailing how your organization will accomplish its mission), and a budget to pay for expenses and administrative help. The budget is particularly important, because skimping on necessary services such as insurance, accounting, legal and payroll help can lead to errors that cost a lot of money to fix later. 

Get Adequate Insurance

Legal setbacks can happen even to well-run nonprofits. Getting adequate insurance will ensure these setbacks don’t have disastrous financial consequences. Directors & Officers (“D&O”) insurance protects board members and officers from personal liability for alleged wrongdoing such as mismanagement and breach of fiduciary duties (including the legal defense costs of such allegations), and is essential for any organization. Organizations with more than 1 or 2 employees should also look into Employment Practices Liability (EPL) insurance, which protects the organization against allegations of wrongful termination, discrimination, harassment and other employment practices – the most frequent source of litigation for nonprofits. Lastly, organizations engaging in any type of complex business practice should consider Errors & Omissions (E&O) insurance. 

Keep Good Financial Records

An organization cannot function without good financial records (and failure to keep good records is usually the first step towards disaster). Good financial records are necessary to support the positions taken on the Form 990, to comply with restrictions on grants, and for the Board of Directors to fulfill its fiduciary duties. Nonprofit accounting raises unique and challenging issues that require the help of an expert, at least occasionally. Consider hiring an outsourced accountant to assist with your financial recordkeeping, and look into whether your organization should have an audit, review or compilation by a reputable CPA firm with nonprofit expertise.

Keep Good Board Meeting Minutes

Aside from the financial records, the Board meeting minutes tell the story of your organization more than any other document. In the event of any legal controversy, the minutes from your Board meetings will be closely examined to determine the facts. Unfortunately many nonprofits make the mistake of not including enough detail, or including too much detail in the Board meeting minutes. It can be difficult to strike the right balance. As a general rule, an organization should document the general gist of the discussion (there is no need to transcribe every statement made at a meeting), and include detail where necessary to protect the Board and document important transactions, such as when the Board exercises due diligence in business transactions or compensation decisions. 

Adopt and Follow the Essential Corporate Policies

Most nonprofits adopt the three corporate policies mentioned in the Form 990: the conflict of interest policy, whistleblower policy, and document retention and destruction policy. In addition, it is advisable to adopt a travel and expense reimbursement policy, a charitable gift acceptance policy, and an employee handbook. However, it’s not enough to simply adopt these policies and file them away. An organization’s directors, officers and employees must also know the terms of all its policies and take steps to implement the policy terms into daily practice. 
This blog was written by Academy for Nonprofit Excellence Instructor, Benjamin Takis. 
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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TCC WorkforceVA
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You’ve just been laid off, so what happens now? In today’s tough economy, losing your job can feel overwhelmingly stressful, but it doesn’t have to be a negative experience in the long term. Even if you’re feeling discouraged, the key to getting back on track is to immediately jump into planning a brighter professional future. Instead of panicking, treat your firing as an opportunity to invest in your skills and move on to a more fulfilling and higher-paying position. Here’s a three-step guide to unlocking your career potential.

1. Focus on the future

In most cases, layoffs happen when companies fail to meet their budget goals, but being told that you’re out of a job can still feel extremely personal. Because negative thinking can sap your self-confidence, take a moment to acknowledge that getting fired is a completely normal and common fact of life. The vast majority of people will lose a job at least once in their lifetime, and many will go on to bigger and better opportunities. Feel free to take a day off to unwind, but don’t let getting fired slow you down. After the initial shock wears off, start making concrete plans and setting new goals for the next stage of your professional life.

2. Invest in yourself with professional training programs

Now that your schedule is wide open, there’s no better time to get back in the classroom. Whether you want to break into a whole new industry or land a great job in your current field, education is the best way to make your dreams possible. Remember that you don’t need to commit to an expensive four-year degree to see results. Signing up for short-term programs and certification courses can open up a world of new opportunities at a price you can afford.

3. Market your skills and experience

With resources that range from business-oriented social networks to employment websites and industry message boards, promoting your skills today is easier than ever before. Connecting with industry insiders on social media, building your own website, sending your resume to multiple recruiters and attaching personalized cover letters to applications are all smart ways to stand out from the crowd. Before you get started, make your resume a winner. For ways to polish it to perfection, follow the resume-building guide from the Wall Street Journal.

Want to know more about workforce development in Virginia? Contact TCC Workforce Solutions today to find out how our career services, specialized classes and custom training programs can help move your career in the right direction.
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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TCC WorkforceVA
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Most nonprofits view collecting information on outcomes for their clients as a daunting task, a waste of resources, or both. However, the process of data collection and outcomes measurement is a critical activity for any nonprofit that seeks to improve the quality of services it provides. Without knowing what they do well and what needs to be improved, nonprofits can end up providing the same services for years without ever really knowing if they could be doing something different that would lead to greater benefits for the population they are serving.

For a nonprofit to provide the best services possible to its clients, it must measure its outcomes. This is easier said than done; frequently the entire culture of the organization must change to become more accepting of the regular collection of outcomes. Fortunately, there are steps that a nonprofit can take to make this culture change more feasible and more lasting.

Changing the Conversation

The first (and perhaps most critical) step in creating a culture of outcomes measurement is getting everyone to understand this simple statement:

A nonprofit should measure outcomes for a single reason: to improve the quality of services for clients.

Far too often, nonprofits think of data collection and evaluation as a chore that has to be done to satisfy funding organizations. This line of reasoning, unfortunately, drives nonprofits to collect only what’s required by funders in the short term, rather than information that would allow the organization to determine how to improve services for clients over time.

To avoid this trap, a nonprofit’s leadership must change the conversation entirely. Leaders must recognize and then clearly communicate that outcomes measurement is not about simply counting things or gathering information. And it is not about satisfying funders. It is an internal effort aimed at figuring out what works and what doesn’t, so that the organization can provide the best possible services to its clients. This approach usually resonates with nonprofit staff, nearly all of whom share a deep commitment to making a difference for those who need assistance.

How Do You Know That Your Organization Is Not Hurting Clients?

Every nonprofit assumes that its programs and services are doing good for its clients. Unfortunately, no organization is perfect. No program is perfect. No individual is perfect. Despite the best of intentions, nonprofits will make mistakes, and those mistakes can cause harm to clients or participants. At the Latin American Youth Center  (LAYC), a youth-development agency with multiple locations in the National Capital Region, we learned this lesson the hard way.

In 2007, one of LAYC’s parenting programs added some lessons to an existing curriculum. The additional lessons focused on domestic violence issues with the intent of teaching parents that domestic violence is not appropriate in any culture and that there are safe ways to escape domestic violence situations.

When the programming was completed, I analyzed the tests we administered before and after the program. The results were shocking. LAYC’s parenting programming, with the additional domestic violence lessons included, actually changed the participants’ attitudes toward domestic violence in the wrong direction. 

After finishing our programming, a greater number of participants believed that domestic violence is an appropriate expression of love between partners, that domestic violence is an acceptable part of the Latino culture, and that there is no safe way to leave a violent partner. In a very real sense, our program caused harm to our participants, despite the best of intentions.

Fortunately, because LAYC was collecting information on the participants’ attitudes before and after the program, we were able to make important changes to this program before starting with the next group of participants. In the original domestic violence classes we had provided the instruction in a mixed-gender environment. Aft seeing the negative results, we consulted with domestic violence experts and then split the classes into separate classrooms for men and women so that each could feel more comfortable expressing their feelings. This change, along with others, brought positive, statistically significant changes in attitude in every single cohort.

Making Good Use of the Data We Collect

Once staff members have bought into the idea of outcomes measurement, the next critical step is getting them to actually use the data they are collecting. This means creating reports and data summaries that staff can easily utilize to make decisions. Collecting data is important, but if the data are never used to influence decisions or change programs, then they do not benefit clients.

In LAYC’s residential and housing programs, staff members have taken this message to heart. Every six months staff examine nineteen independent-living skill areas (e.g., personal hygiene, money management, housekeeping) and the progress made by residents. For those areas where residents fail to show progress or actually demonstrate regression in skills, residential staff increase the amount of instruction (at the group and individual level) to offer greater reinforcement of lessons and skills. These extra hours are redistributed from instruction on skill areas where residents are showing significant progress. In this way, staff can change their instructional patterns to match the needs of residents.

By providing staff with information to help them refine and adjust their work, an organization can empower staff to continually improve the quality of services they provide to clients. Data can be a tool to allow staff to serve their clients better, rather than a burden to overcome. This ultimately is how the culture change can be maintained over time.

 

This blog was written by Isaac Castillo who teaches classes at our Academy for Nonprofit Excellence. 

He is the Director of Data and Evaluation for the DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative

This article originally appeared in the book, Leap of Reason, which is available in full at leapofreason.org
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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TCC WorkforceVA
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What’s the last in-depth article you read on the web? The last time you read the instructions before filling out a web form? What’s the welcome message on your favorite site?

If you’re like most web users, the answers are never, never, and don’t know. We don’t read writing on the web word for word – we scan it, using headlines and bullets as quick clues to content, and we make guesses at how things work. 

Yet when we write copy for the web, we often write lengthy introductions, dense paragraphs, and detailed instructions – and we count on our audience reading every word.

In fact, people usually spend a minute or less on a web page, and according to usability expert Jakob Nielsen, “on the average webpage, users have time to read at most 28% of the words during an average visit; 20% is more likely.” 
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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TCC WorkforceVA
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Manufacturing is returning to the United States and Hampton Roads is no exception. The demand for all trades, especially skilled machinists continues to grow as this business returns. This demand is exacerbated with an aging workforce and looming retirements. Tidewater Community College has embarked on a multi-pronged effort to build the pipeline of qualified manufacturing talent.

Recently, Tidewater Community College launched a career studies certificate in Mechatronics Engineering. This is a professional discipline that combines Mechanical Engineering with other fields of engineering such as Electrical and Electronic, Computer Technology and Control Engineering. This engineering discipline draws on expertise and professional skills of various fields to evolve into a very specific specialization in its own right.

As an accompaniment to TCC’s academic offerings, the Center for Workforce Solutions has also created a series of non-credit courses for machining and CNC operators. Recently the first class of Machining Skills, Level 1 graduated and prepared to move onward in their machining careers. In the fall of 2014, the Level 1 class will be repeated and the Level 2 course will be launched. The series conclusion will be the Basic CNC Operation course to be delivered in January 2015.

The success of TCC’s Mechantronics program and the Machining series is the direct result of industry partnerships. We would like to thank IMS: Gear for hosting the Machining classes and lab, Sumitomo Drive Technologies for their support in developing the curriculum and for Busch Manufacturing for offering to host the upcoming CNC course next year.
Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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TCC WorkforceVA
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In a perfect alternate universe, finding your dream job is as simple as calling up the employer of your choice and asking when you can start. Of course, things don't work like this in the real world. Fortunately, today's workers have access to an impressive lineup of job profiling tools that can help make sense of their skills and capabilities. ACT's WorkKeys Assessments are among the most popular such tools for folks who need job training help.
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Whether you are in search of knowledge or certification for a new career, or need a custom designed training to meet your complicated business needs, TCC Center for Workforce Solutions works for you. Updates from WFS. Training Can Overcome the Stress of Change · Five Habits to Avoid Nonprofit ...
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